Question about Canon PowerShot S1 IS Digital Camera

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My canon s1is, after few years of regular usage, and getting all expensive lenses, stoped opening the screen in build in lens, all electronic works, I can change and see the settings, but no picture can be taken as I can see only darknes in the viewer and on the screen. Is there anything I can do except paying £300 for fixing it?

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It is known problem of ccd imager chip failure in Canon S1 IS camera, replace ccd imager chip to get live view in camera mode to take fresh pictures.
Local camera repair shop will do this job because soldering work is involve and camera will take apart in detail.
Thanks.

Posted on Oct 03, 2010

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I have a canon Zoom FD 70-210mm 1:4 lens off a SLR camera. Will it work with digital cameras?


No Canon FD lenses cannot be used on Canon EOS system cameras (all autofocus Canons except for the ancient and obsolete Canon T-series 35mm SLR's from the 1980's use the EOS mount).

There are very few cameras which can take them (35mm or digital) without some kind of expensive mounting converter which would include corrective optics.

If in good condition though it's a great lens and can be used on plenty of old Canon classic 35mm SLR models such as the AE1, AT-1 , AV-1 and Canon T-series, all of which are cheap//free and readily available.

Jul 13, 2011 | Canon Zoom Telephoto 70-210mm f.4 FD Lens

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Can an old film sigma uc zoom 70-210mm lens work on canon digital cameras


In short, no. Not without an expensive adapter which includes a corrective lens (which also reduces the optical quality). Even then, the lens will be fully manual only and might only be operable at the widest aperture setting.

If your Canon uses the APS-C sized sensor (all except a few highly expensive professional full-frame models do) then the 70-210 lens will produce a cropped image as if you were using a 112-336mm lens, so it may also be less useful to you.

Aug 14, 2010 | Canon Cameras

1 Answer

Canon EOS 500n 35mm Film Camera, best cheap lens


In short, you won't. All Canon Digital SLR's use the same lens mounting system as your EOS 500n and new lenses are very expensive especially for those who have purchased full-frame models.

As a result, demand for the lenses which fit your camera is very high and so prices are high as well: it's just basic supply and demand economics. There were cheaply made kit lenses available with your camera when it was new, but like most kit lenses they weren't built to last, so most of the older ones are either non-functional or have been scrapped after owners upgraded. All that leaves are the higher quality, well built, lenses from the time your camera was made which are far cheaper than new lenses but still comparatively expensive.

If you want cheap lenses then you've picked the wrong system. Buy an older FD mount Canon SLR if you want to stay with Canon; you'll then find that lenses are so cheap that they're often offered for free on your local FreeCycle group. The same source is where I've got all of my manual focus (and some AF) SLR equipment over the last few years.

Mar 14, 2010 | Canon EOS 500n 35mm Film Camera

1 Answer

I have an old minolta camera gear, a X-700 camera and eight manual lenses, also have a Maxxum 600si with two tamron lenses and one vivitar. I am planning to buy a digital slr camera around $500 - $700...


Option 1 without any doubt.

The old Minolta gear is incompatible with the later Minolta AF mount. The Maxxum AF lenses will work on Sony Alpha (may have some compatibility issues though) but will all behave as if fitted with a teleconverter due to the image sensor being smaller than a 35mm film frame.

Modern lenses are not only designed from the start with digital use in mind, but have all the benefits of the latest computer aided design so are usually optically far better than earlier glass, although the actual build quality is usually unimpressive.

Using your old glass on a new body with an adaptor is like buying a brand new car and fitting it with a motorcycle engine. It isn't always possible, and when it is you'll have all sorts of compatibility and handling issues which will prevent you from using many of the features of your new camera. If you buy a Canon digital SLR then it usually isn't possible at all as the lens register is the deepest of all current brands (completely the opposite to Canon's 35mm SLR's which could use adaptors for most other makes of lenses). Nikon have a similar issue. Four Thirds (e.g. Olympus and Panasonic) mount cameras have the shortest register and can take adaptors for most other lenses, but there will be no data communication at all between the lens and the body and there will be an even greater teleconverter effect: a 24mm wide angle for 35mm film use will have an almost identical angle of view as a 50mm standard (35mm film) prime lens.

All this may seem to be a disadvantage, but it isn't. You are freed from any legacy use concerns of any kind, and can sell your current gear to raise funds for whichever system you prefer!

Optically, they're all more than acceptable and reviews which claim that a lens is poorer than another are true, but in real world amateur use you just aren't going to see the differences unless you regularly use your camera on a tripod and enlarge your images to print at huge sizes.

Just try out a few and see what feels right:-

Canon and Nikon are widely supported but tend to be bigger and bulkier. Both also offer very expensive "full frame" SLR's which have a sensor about the same size as a 35mm film frame: excellent if you're a pro or high-end amateur with a major investment in older lenses. Nikon's have the edge in this respect over Canon as they can still take lenses all the way back to the late 1950's but Canon are limited to lenses made since the late 1980's but it's not a major concern as few want to use glass that old anyway.

Sony have a policy of aggressive pricing, but their offerings are clearly not designed to last any more than a few years (neither are any of the budget/enthusiast SLR's, but Sony haven't made any attempt to pretend otherwise). The curent Sony offerings are also very menu intensive, and fairly basic functions which you'll often need such as white balance tend to need a few button presses rather than the Konica-Minolta approach which was to have a clearly marked and located button.

Four Thirds cameras (and the newer Micro Four Thirds) are very compact and lightweight but have the smallest SLR imagers so the lenses have relatively wide depth of field even at fully open aperture: not good if you like to use narrow depth of field, but can be a creative advantage with other styles of photography. Although I've always been an Olympus user I'm reluctant to invest with them as they left me high and dry with their 35mm range many years ago and then abandoned their 35mm AF system which I'd invested in. Now that Four Thirds has it's own confusing competitor with Micro Four Thirds and there's a limited lens range anyway it's something I'd personally steer clear of but is a superb system if you crave small SLR's and lenses which aren't bulky and heavy.

Pentax seem to be fine and are well priced, they're also best placed to use older K and KA-system lenses albeit with many compromises.

Unless going for Canon or Nikon, don't pay any attention to "in the long run". Digital photography is still evolving at a tremendous pace and so don't expect any equipment to last or be truly useful (some lenses excepted) in six years time.

Buy what suits you now and get shooting: it's far too easy to let the equipment get in the way of that simple aim!

Jan 19, 2010 | Konica Minolta Cameras

1 Answer

My canon EF-S 17-85 IS USM lens will cause an error 99 when in wide angles at 35mm or less. The iris closes but will not open until I "re-boot" the camera. Other lenses work fine on the camera and the...


Zborn, did you find any solutions? I have had same lense for 2-3 years, taken maybe 10000 shots and just yesterday started to get error 99. Spent most of today trouble-shooting to repeat problem and it seems that when I set to less than 35mm I get the error 99. other settings and my other lense has no problems.

Dec 18, 2009 | Canon EF-S 17-85MM F/4-5.6 IS USM Lens

1 Answer

Canon s1is "lens error, restart camera" appears on screen


Problem: dust in the gaps near lens which makes it jammed. Effect: the sceen shows blk color. Solution: just blow over it or vaccum it.

Dec 15, 2009 | Opteka (OPT-42XHD2-S1IS) for Canon...

2 Answers

Error 99 on EOS Canon 450D


This is what the people at the canon tech support say to do for error 99



read this!! :)

The guy at tech support listened and then told me that the lens contacts were dirty and to get a pencil with an eraser on the end, just a regular old pencil with a red rubber eraser. Detach the lens from the camera, hold it so that the lens’ gold contacts are pointing down and lightly erase their exposed surface, cleaning them of any hand oil that might have gotten on them.

Do the same thing with the gold contacts inside the camera body. This is a bit harder but it’s doable: just hold camera so lens opening points down so no gunk falls in. Erase lightly. I used a lens cloth and dabbed at the contacts rather than blow them so as not to blow the erasings inside the camera.

I did this to each of my three lenses just to be sure. Lo and behold, it worked



hope this works for you!!!! have a nice day!! :) :)

Dec 04, 2009 | Canon EOS 450D Digital Camera

1 Answer

Hi, I've recently uncovered my dad's old camera a Nikon FG, unfortunatly none of the lenses I have are Nikon and will not work with the camera. Is there a Lens converter for the Nikon FG that will allow me...


Unfortunately it's not possible. Along with the Olympus OM system, Nikon had very deep camera bodies so you cannot get adapters which will allow infinity focussing. As a result, very few adapters were ever made and those which exist only allow the lens to be used for close-up photography. Even when a converter is available it does not usually permit automatic lens operation nor does it allow the communication of aperture settings to the camera body.

You will have to obtain Nikon F-Mount lenses if you wish to use your FG. They don't have to be expensive: I've acquired a fair collection of both lenses and bodies in the last two years for the princely sum of zilch just by looking on my local FreeCycle/Freegle groups.

Online auction sites have plenty of them, but as long as you're not after the more unusual and higher quality lenses which attract collectors prices can be quite low. If the lenses are third party ones from the likes of Sunagor, Hoya, Bell & Howell, Miranda and a few others then they're usually perfectly good but were budget brands and usually are near worthless. Other third party brands such as Tamron, Tokina, Vivitar, Sigma were regarded as much better quality (often unjustifiably) and so command higher prices but the "bread and butter" lenses still tend to be relatively cheap.

Conversely, Canon 35mm SLR bodies were the thinnest ones around and so could accept adapters to take virtually all other 35mm SLR lenses. A few were even sophisticated enough to allow automatic operation and lens to body communication of the aperture setting but they were very scarce and expensive. I've also acquired a lot of Canon SLRs and lenses from FreeCycle/Freegle, so again there is no need to spend anything other than shipping costs and to invest in a few batteries and occasional spare parts/foam renovation kits.

I hope that my answer has not burst your bubble, instead I hope that it's given you new possibilities. All I ask in return is that you rate my answer.

For more details on mounting mismatched lenses and bodies, see the excellent CameraQuest website:-

http://www.cameraquest.com/adaptslr.htm

Oct 25, 2009 | Nikon FG 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Ive had my canon 300D for a few years now, and just recently its started giving me this "error 99" in the lcd screen what is the problem?


This is what the people at the canon tech support say to do for error 99



read this!! :)

The guy at tech support listened and then told me that the lens contacts were dirty and to get a pencil with an eraser on the end, just a regular old pencil with a red rubber eraser. Detach the lens from the camera, hold it so that the lens’ gold contacts are pointing down and lightly erase their exposed surface, cleaning them of any hand oil that might have gotten on them.

Do the same thing with the gold contacts inside the camera body. This is a bit harder but it’s doable: just hold camera so lens opening points down so no gunk falls in. Erase lightly. I used a lens cloth and dabbed at the contacts rather than blow them so as not to blow the erasings inside the camera.

I did this to each of my three lenses just to be sure. Lo and behold, it worked



hope this works for you!!!! have a nice day!! :) :)

Oct 14, 2009 | Canon Digital Rebel / EOS-300D Digital...

3 Answers

Canon MV650i


First of all is it still under warrent? Did u get it at Sears? The blue screen looks like it would if u have it on play with it stoped?

Aug 15, 2007 | Canon MV650i Mini DV Digital Camcorder

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