Question about Greenlee 10859 NA CAT III CM950 ACDC True RMS Clamp Meter Includes Certificate of Calibration CM950C

Open Question

My greenlee clamp on meter only seems to read half of the voltage or amps that I am testing on. EX 120 volts will read some place in the 50's, 40 amps will read in the teen's to low 20's

Posted by on

Ad

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

My gilera seems to have voltage drop and cause my engine to cut off when i press my brake.


Hi, Herman the following is a comprehensive charging system test that is guaranteed to the find issue with your system.
1. Battery Test: The battery needs to be a fully charged and load tested to ensure proper readings, connections need to be clean and tight. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
2. Charging System Voltage Test: Start motorcycle, measure DC volts across the battery terminals you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts.
3. Check Connections/Wires: Inspect the regulator/stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection/corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolates the Stator & Rotor. If AC Output test Fails and Resistance Check, and Stator IB Test Pass then Rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
5. AC Output Check:
Unplug the regulator plug from the stator
Start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts.
Probe both stator wires with your meter lead.
The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
Stator Resistance Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual for specification
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
Stator IB test or Ground Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
If there is continuity to ground your stator is shorted to ground.
5. Regulator Test: Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
Identifying Wires:
Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).
Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test: This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire.
The reading should be Infinite.
With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires.
The reading should be Infinite.
Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
Ground AC output 1 Voltage
Ground AC output 2 Voltage
AC output 1 Ground ?
AC output 2 Ground ?
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
http://www.jetav8r.com/Vision/Stator/fault_finding_by_www.electrosport.com.pdf

Feb 21, 2017 | Gilera Motorcycles

1 Answer

2005 vl 1500 charging system system not charging checked generator 3 wires giving pluss 80v at 5000rpm instaled new rectifier voltage across battery under 13 volts could faulty battery be problem


Hi, Anonymous the following is a comprehensive charging system test that I found on a Rider Groups website
1. Battery Test: The battery needs to be a fully charged battery that has been load tested to ensure proper readings. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Most places like Auto Zone, Advance Auto, and Pep Boys will charge and test motorcycle batteries for free. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
2. Charging System Voltage Test: Start motorcycle, Measure DC Volts across the battery terminals (you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts).
3. Check Connections/Wires: Inspect the regulator/stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection/corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolate the stator & Rotor, If AC Output test Fails and Resistance Check, and Stator IB Test Pass then Rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
AC Output Check:
Unplug the regulator plug from the stator
Start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts.
Probe both stator wires with your meter leads.
The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. (Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification)
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
Stator Resistance Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. (Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual for specification)
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
Stator IB test or Ground Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
If there is continuity to ground your stator is shorted to ground.
5. Regulator Test: Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
Identifying Wires:
Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).
Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test: This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire.
The reading should be Infinite.
With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires.
The reading should be Infinite.
Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
Ground AC output 1 Voltage
Ground AC output 2 Voltage
AC output 1 Ground ?
AC output 2 Ground ?
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the links below. Good luck and have a nice day.
http://www.crowitis.com/images/VL1500_Charging_System_Wiring_Upgrades.pdf
stator output voltage
http://www.jetav8r.com/Vision/Stator/fault_finding_by_www.electrosport.com.pdf
Suzuki VL1500 Service Manual
OEM parts for Suzuki
Suzuki VZ1500 Owner Manual

Jan 16, 2017 | Motorcycles

1 Answer

How to calibrate a greenlee cmi-100


unless you have a calibrator, send it off to you local calibration place and get it calibrated

Aug 06, 2014 | Greenlee CMI-100 Industrial Clamp Meter

1 Answer

Why would a new battery drain when car is turned off. I need to drive each day. If car sits battery will drain. I see others have had this problems. Has anyone founds an answer?


To test the car for electrical drains requires a digital volt ohm meter (DVOM) Best is to drive the car awhile so battery is close to full charge. Set parking brake and raise hood place the meter on battery red lead to + and black to - set dial to read DC voltage 20 volt scale This should read about 13.0 volts now start car and check again reading should be 13.2 volts or higher but not greater than 15.0 volt leave leads on battery and turn dial on voltmeter to the 1 volt AC scale this reading should be less than 120MV or .120 volts if good the charging system is in working order any thing out range you have a bad alternator. Now with car running make sure your accessories are off shut off car and exit note to watch for sentinel dome lights let then fade out. Now place DVOM on a ampere scale 10 amp preferred here is the tricky part place one lead in the center of the battery post and the other on the cable end slowly remove with out breaking connection this will read the total amperage draw against battery This draw after 10 minutes should be less than .300MA Milli-amps if it is not use a small hose clamp to keep lead on post and clip other to cable end touch battery until sentinel goes out and retest now start removing main fuses in fuse panel until draw is gone. Now you have identified the circuit that is causing your problem.

Aug 03, 2014 | 2004 Nissan Quest

1 Answer

AC surge current?


you are missing the voltage supply here to get an definitive answer
for 240 volts drawing 4.8 amps the required wattage is 1152
for 120 volts the wattage is 576 watts
for 120 volts with a current of 900 watts , it equates to 7.5 amps
with 240 volts with a current of 1150 watts , it equates to 4.79 amps
so you can see the problem by not stating the supply voltage
get access to an cable clamp amp meter / watt meter from an electrician and read the current on starting the ac unit
if it exceeds 900 watts for 120 volts or 1150 for 240 volts , consider a bigger generator

Aug 31, 2017 | Fixya.com Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

1985 gl1200 overcharging at idle will climb to16 volts, new battery


Hi, Anonymous before testing any electrical component in the Charging System it is "IMPERATIVE" that you have a fully charged battery of 12.5 volts or more and be able to pass a proper "LOAD" test if necessary, you may have a preliminary reading of 12.5 volts or more but little or zero amperage, the battery is faulty and must be replaced. AGM type batteries fall into this scenario more so than lead acid batteries.
1. Battery Test:
The battery needs to be a fully charged and load tested to ensure proper readings, connections need to be clean and tight. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
2. Charging System Voltage Test:
Start motorcycle, measure DC volts across the battery terminals you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts.
3. Connections and wires:
Inspect the regulator stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolates the Stator & Rotor. If AC output and resistance test fail and stator test passes then the rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
5. AC Output Check:
Unplug the regulator plug from the stator start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts. Probe both stator wires with your meter lead. The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
Stator Resistance Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale. Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. Reading will vary depending on the system, check the service manual for specifications.
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
Stator Ground Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
If there is continuity your stator is shorted to ground and must be replaced.
5. Regulator Test:
Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
Identifying Wires:
Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).
Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test:
This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire. The reading should be Infinite. With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires. The reading should be Infinite.
Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
Ground AC output 1 Voltage
Ground AC output 2 Voltage
AC output 1 Ground ?
AC output 2 Ground ?
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
85 ltd Goldwing is charging at 16 volts
HOW TO CHECK YOUR CHARGING SYSTEM and CHANGING the STATOR and REGULATOR...
Honda GL1200D Shop Manual
http://www.partsfish.com/page/oem-parts-for-honda
Honda GL1200 1986 Owner Manual

Apr 14, 2013 | 1985 Honda GL 1200 Ltd. Ed. - SE-i Gold...

1 Answer

Charging voltage to high, cooking batteries and head lights


Hi, Anonymous you may need a new voltage regulator the following is a comprehensive charging system test that I found on a Rider Groups website 1. Battery Test: The battery needs to be a fully charged battery that has been load tested to ensure proper readings. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Most places like Auto Zone, Advance Auto, and Pep Boys will charge and test motorcycle batteries for free. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
2. Charging System Voltage Test: Start motorcycle, Measure DC Volts across the battery terminals (you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts).
3. Check Connections/Wires: Inspect the regulator/stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection/corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolate the stator & Rotor, If AC Output test Fails and Resistance Check, and Stator IB Test Pass then Rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
AC Output Check:
Unplug the regulator plug from the stator
Start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts.
Probe both stator wires with your meter leads.
The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. (Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification)
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
Stator Resistance Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. (Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual for specification)
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
Stator IB test or Ground Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
If there is continuity to ground your stator is shorted to ground.
5. Regulator Test: Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
Identifying Wires:
Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).
Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test: This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire.
The reading should be Infinite.
With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires.
The reading should be Infinite.
Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
Ground AC output 1 Voltage
Ground AC output 2 Voltage
AC output 1 Ground ?
AC output 2 Ground ?
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the links below. Good luck and have a nice day.
http://www.jetav8r.com/Vision/Stator/fault_finding_by_www.electrosport.com.pdf
Electrical issue and fault finding chart
Yamaha zeal 250 service manual
Manuals Data Zealous
OEM parts for Yamaha

Dec 02, 2012 | 2000 Yamaha FZX 250 Zeal

1 Answer

03 wr 250 is blowing light bulbs


Hi, Dean the following is a comprehensive charging system test that I found on a Rider Groups website 1. Battery Test: The battery needs to be a fully charged battery that has been load tested to ensure proper readings. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Most places like Auto Zone, Advance Auto, and Pep Boys will charge and test motorcycle batteries for free. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
2. Charging System Voltage Test: Start motorcycle, Measure DC Volts across the battery terminals (you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts).
3. Check Connections/Wires: Inspect the regulator/stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection/corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolate the stator & Rotor, If AC Output test Fails and Resistance Check, and Stator IB Test Pass then Rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
AC Output Check:
Unplug the regulator plug from the stator
Start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts.
Probe both stator wires with your meter leads.
The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. (Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification)
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
Stator Resistance Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. (Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual for specification)
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
Stator IB test or Ground Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
If there is continuity to ground your stator is shorted to ground.
5. Regulator Test: Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
Identifying Wires:
Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).
Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test: This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire.
The reading should be Infinite.
With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires.
The reading should be Infinite.
Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
Ground AC output 1 Voltage
Ground AC output 2 Voltage
AC output 1 Ground ?
AC output 2 Ground ?
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the links below. Good luck and have a nice day.
2004 wr250f blowing bulbs
03 WR450 lights blowing
YAMAHA WR250F Owner Service Manual
OEM parts for Yamaha
http://mybikemanuals.com/yamaha/yamaha-wr-owners-manuals

Nov 08, 2012 | 2003 Yamaha WR 250 F

1 Answer

New heaters need to do a start up or testing for proper operation model f2f5103n TPI corp. Industrial type heater


When you are ready to test run the unit you should take an amperage draw reading on the elements.
The formula to see if the elements are drawing the correct amps is: (voltage x amps=watts) example: If a heating element is 1500 watts and your voltage is 120 volts, then your amps will be 12.5 amps. (120v x 12.5A=1500W)
The easiest way to check amp draw is with a clamp on amp meter.

Nov 24, 2009 | Fahrenheat Ceiling-Mount Industrial Heater...

1 Answer

Voltage drop test


First, check battery post to cable connection: positive meter lead on battery positive post, negaitve lead on battery's positive cable clamp. Crank the engine and note the reading. A good connection should have zero voltage drop. Second, check the positive cable: positve meter lead on positive battery clamp, negative lead on starter terminal connector. A good cable will show a voltage drop of .2 volts or less while cranking. Third, check the starter connection: positive meter lead on positive battery terminal on the solenoid, negative meter lead on actual starter stud. A good connection will have a voltage drop of near zero volts. Now to check the negative side of the circuit. Total drop on the ground side should be .3 volts or less and can be checked by placing positive meter lead on starter housing and negative meter lead on battery ground post. Take your reading while cranking the engine, and be sure your connection at the starter is solid and clean. If total voltage drop on this side of the circuit is excessive, complete testing at all connections in the same fashion as the positive side of the circuit. Check the following: between battery post and clamp (zero voltage drop), cable end at battery to cable end at engine. (.2 volts or less), cable end at engine to engine itself (near zero voltage drop), and finally between starter housing and engine block (.1 volts or less).

To read the entire procedure for all automotive systems read this artile:
http://www.engine-light-help.com/voltage-drop.html

Aug 31, 2008 | 1997 Chevrolet Blazer

Not finding what you are looking for?
Greenlee 10859 NA CAT III CM950 ACDC True RMS Clamp Meter  Includes Certificate of Calibration CM950C Logo

Related Topics:

18 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Greenlee Measuring Tools & Sensors Experts

Wbix

Level 2 Expert

283 Answers

Vuk B

Level 3 Expert

683 Answers

Tom Chichester

Level 3 Expert

37853 Answers

Are you a Greenlee Measuring Tool and Sensor Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...