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I have quite an old tasco telescope. we can see the target star/planet with the finder, but when we switch to look thru the magnification, we see only black. the lens cover is off. dod you ahve any suggestions

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You have NOT lined up the finder scope with the main tube. Point the scope at the moon or a bright star and get the moon or the star into the main tube's eyepiece.

Without moving the scope adjust the screws on the sides of the finder scope and center the crosshairs on the target. Now you can use the finder to line up the main tube.

Posted on Sep 28, 2010

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I cannot see anything thru my telescope


  1. Get Stellarium or another fine astronomy program
  2. During the day, point the telescope at a part of the landscape about 100 yards away.
  3. Use the lowest power eyepiece (highest number) in the focal tube.
  4. Center the landscape object in the telescope.
  5. Align the finder scope so that it points exactly where the main telescope is.
  6. At night, leave the scope out to reach thermal equilibrium (about an hour for small reflectors and refractors)
  7. If the scope is on a EQ mount, polar align.
  8. Point the finder at the moon. The moon should be in the main scope also.
  9. Practice finding the moon before you start on the planets
  10. Once you are comfortable with the moon and planets, you can go for the deep sky objects

Sep 19, 2012 | Tasco Galaxsee® 46-114500 (500 x 114mm)...

2 Answers

All we see through the telescope is black


New telescope users are taken by surprise at the difficulty of just pointing the telescope in the right direction to see anything. The field of view is quite limited, especially if you are using a high power eyepiece. The higher the power of eyepiece on a telescope, the dimmer the image, the more difficult to aim it at any chosen object, and the more difficult to focus. When the scope is not focussed, even if there are stars in the field of view, they will only be faint blurs.

It is best when you are starting out with a telescope to try it with the least powerful eyepiece (the one with the highest number) to begin with, until you become more familiar with how it works. Do NOT use the Barlow lens if one came with the scope.

The finder scope is meant to help you get the main scope lined up on the object you want to view, but it won't be any use in pointing the telescope until you adjust it to precisely line up with the main scope. Telescope manuals recommend that you do this in daylight, by pointing the scope at an object on the horizon and adjusting the finder to match (never point a telescope toward the Sun!). Once you have a tree or mountain peak in the center of the main scope's image, you can then adjust the screws around the finder scope to get the crosshairs (or red dot) centered on the same object. It is very difficult to do this job in the dark, especially as objects in the sky are constantly on the move.

You will find that there is a very wide range of movement in the focus mechanism, because different eyepieces focus at different points, but the actual focus range for any eyepiece will be a small part of the overall range afforded by the focusing mount. It is much easier to familiarise yourself with this in daylight.

At this point you will learn that astronomical telescopes usually show an upside down image. There is a good reason for this- erecting the image needs more bits of glass in the light path, which reduces the amount of light and increases aberrations. Even if this is only slight, astronomers prefer to avoid it, and they don't really care which way up the Moon or Jupiter appear. It is possible to fit an erecting prism or eyepiece to most astronomical telescopes, and some of them come with one, but one wouldn't bother to do this with the small finder scope.

Once you have done the above, you can try the scope at night, on an easy to find bright object like the Moon. Looking at random stars will probably be disappointing, as they don't look different under magnification. You will have to find planets, star clusters or nebula to see anything interesting. You will also find the the object you are looking at swims out of the viewing field, and you must continually move the scope to follow it. This will be more pronounced at higher magnifications. Again, use the least powerful eyepiece. Small scopes are often advertised as having unrealistic powers (300, 500) which can never be practically achieved. You just get dim blurs.

There is an excellent website for beginner telescope users at THIS LINK

Jan 08, 2011 | Tasco Novice 30060402 (402 x 60mm)...

1 Answer

I have a tasco galaxsee 14-114375. when i look through the high powered eye peice i can never find the object. i can see colours if i look at buildings and such, but if i try to see a star its just black....


1. Your finder is not properly aligned with the telescope. Therefore you are not looking at what the finder is looking at.
2. Max. power of the scope is 250x (if everything was perfect and it ain't) 375x like they say on the box is a LIE!
Tasco eyepieces are junk and you may be suffering from eyepiece "blackout" magnification = 500(focal length)/ eyepiece focal length

Oct 11, 2010 | Tasco Galaxsee 45-114375 375X (375 x...

1 Answer

I was given a Tasco 675 power reflector telescope model #40-114675, but didn't get an instruction book or dvd. I was able to find a star in the finder scope but couldn't see it through the eyepiece. it...


You must first ALIGN the finderscope with the main tube. Locate a bright object with the main telescope. Get it in the eyepiece- then without moving the telescope, align the finder scope on the same object.

Now you can use the finder like a gun site to center targets on the crosshairs. By the way the Fixya picture in your question always makes me laugh- the telescope in the picture is mounted BACKWARDS and pointed toward the ground!

Jun 01, 2010 | Tasco Luminova 40114675 (675 x 114mm)...

1 Answer

Wont focus correctly


TOO MUCH magnification. Put the eyepiece with the largest number written on it into the telescope. DO NOT USE the 2x barlow. Try Jupiter with lower magnification.

Oct 05, 2009 | Optics

1 Answer

Can not seem to focus when we look through the lens we just see the bk=lack sky we cannot seem to see anything


try this:
see the mini scope on top of the telescope?--that's called the finder scope--
you look through that to see what the telescope is aimed at, just like what a sniper does before he pulls the trigger.

put in the lowest power eyepiece you have in the telescope, the one with a high number on it.

it's a good idea to align the 'finder' with the telescope during the day time--it's much easier.

if your telescope and finder scope aren't aligned properly, aiming your telescope at any target will be off and you'll just get frustrated.
to do this, look through your finder scope and pick a far away target, put in the lowest power eyepiece you have, that's the one with a high number--
high number = low power = a nice big view in the telescope.
low number on eyepiece = high magnification, like a zoom lens.

always use the lowest eyepiece first, then work your way to higher magnification, if you want to get a closer look at your target.

use lowest power eyepiece in telescope--> look through finder scope -->focus the image--> switch to higher power of eyepiece for a closer look at your target.

practice this during the day until you're comfortable, then try it at night.
try the moon, it's a nice big target

you can also use binoculars to check out the night sky.
you can try using 7x35 or 7x50 binoculars.
you see a lot more stars and it gives nice big views of the stars and constellations...and the moon...

hope this helps :D


Jul 30, 2009 | Bushnell Deep Space 78-9512 (120 x 60mm)...

2 Answers

Trying to identify older tasco telescope and put it together


There are only two types of telescopes --- REFRACTORS, and REFLECTORS-

The refractor has a lens on the front of the tube and you insert different eyepieces in the back-- the larger the number written on the eyepiece the LOWER the magnification-- (DO NOT USE THE 2x or 3x barlow which you may have!-- this creates too much power for this small telescope!-- put it away and never use it!)

A reflector has a main mirror on the bottom of the tube, and a small secondary mirror under the eyepiece hole (focuser end) - front end-- put the lowest power eyepiece into the focuser.

Now with either type telescope go out side during the day and practice focusing on a distant object-- turn the knob SLOWLY. At night the moon should be the first target you try.

If you received what appears to be a smaller telescope -- that is the finder scope-- attach it to the top of the tube on the main telescope. Again during the day line up the small finder scope with the main scope-- look at a distant telephone pole (the very top-- and center this in the main telescope. Without moving the main scope use the finder scopes "screws" to adjust the cross hairs so they are pointing exactly where the main scope is pointed. Now you can use the small finder scope to point the telescope in the exact direction--

The moon should be your first night time target.

Good luck--

Mar 17, 2009 | Tasco Astronomical 302675 Telescope

1 Answer

Cannot find a planet?


you need to align your finder scope with the main tube see how to do this here http://www.scribd.com/doc/11827347/Tasco-Telescope-Manual

Sep 13, 2008 | Tasco Luminova 40114675 (675 x 114mm)...

3 Answers

Missing finder scope


i actually have the star finder and its **** honestly. but well mine is old to. so a new one might do you better. but i've attached a rifle scope to mine.

Aug 04, 2008 | Tasco Astronomical 302675 Telescope

2 Answers

Hi we cant seem to see anything from our tasco telescope


It is very difficult to align a straight telescope on small objects like stars and planets. The moon is an easy target, try locating it 1st

Dec 28, 2007 | Tasco Astronomical 302675 Telescope

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