Question about Nikon D60 Digital Camera

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I just got a Nikon 50mm f1.8D for my Nikon D60, when shooting in low light settings the images come out grainy. How do I fix this? My ISO is set on Auto and I've the ISO at 100 or 200 and still grainy. What am I doing wrong? How can I fix this?

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Take the ISO off auto and just set it manually.

Posted on Sep 28, 2010

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When I take a picture with my 18-55 on a d3100 I hear and see through my visor that the image moves and a sound like a click, many seconds after taking the picture. It seems like it's still open and closes...


Hi,

Giving the lens your using and depending on the shooting mode your in. I assume your shooting in a low light situation. The lens you have is not good for low light shooting because the F-stop is only 3.5 at widest, so minimal light gets in so the camera decides what speed to set it at to close the shutter. for example shooting in the school gym or church, the camera speed will be 1/20 second or even up to 1/2 second to get enough lighting into the sensor so the image is properly expose but for you to have a sharp image you will need to shoot on a tripod.

Without tripod and just handheld will create blurry images. I would suggest you bump up the ISO setting to minimum to 3200 or higher that way the camera speed will be higher and reduce handheld shakes that will create blurry images. But remember, increase ISO will increase in image grain.

That is why I suggest you invest into a 17-50mm F2.8 lens for low-lighting or 50mm f1.8 lens.

I hope this helps

Jet

Feb 23, 2011 | Nikon Nikkor 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G ED AF-S DX...

1 Answer

Grainy pictures


If you are taking pictures in low-lighting conditions without flash, then the pictures will appear grainy. Set the ISO to a lower number (try ISO-100 to start with) and use the flash to compensate for low-light conditions.
This should improve the grainy appearance of your photos.

Dec 29, 2010 | Nikon D100 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Shots coming out black or nearly black. I'm shooting in RAW. When I try and rescue them on photoshop they come out really grainy


Sounds like the shots are under exposed with the shutter speed to fast.
Are you shooting in low light and no flash ?

If so, reduce your shutter speed to something like 1/60 with an aperture of around F5.6 - F7.1 (these can be lowered if you raise your iso)

Obviously this will depend on the lens type and brand.

Your statement sounds like you are shooting in raw at a very fast shutter speed with a low iso (200).

The grainy effect is normally due to a lot of noise (high iso) which makes this sound strange to say the least.

Check your camera settings (menu) and turn on noise reducution, this will help in removing some of the noise.

Oct 31, 2009 | Nikon D40x Digital Camera

1 Answer

What settings should I use for my Nikon d60 with a 70-300mm lens to take picures of a night time football game? When the sun goes down, my camera slows and the pictures get blurry.


Set the ISO as high as it will go and the aperture as low as possible. That is as good as it gets without investing a lot of money in pro cameras and lenses that are needed to shoot action in low light. I have a D300 and a 70-200mm f2.8 lens that together cost almost $4000 and it can barely do it. How bad do you want pictures?

Oct 16, 2009 | Nikon D60 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Nikon ISO D100


Sounds like you are set in ISO AUTO. This will change your ISO when you are in light that is low enough to give underexposure. In most of the shooting modes, the D100 will change shutter and/or aperature to prevent underexposure, but if it can't avoid the underexposure, it will change the ISO to correct the underexposure.

It also sounds like you have a low light shooting situation. The blur you see is likely from the long exposure, which is pretty hard to hand hold. Noise in the picture would be from the high ISO, but if it's a noise problem you probably don't have blur.

Avoiding the blur is best done with a tripod or a shutter speed of at most 1/60. If you can't get a good exposure at 1/60 or faster, then try the tripod. If you can't use a tripod, then let the ISO (in auto) go up to 1600 and then remove the noise with photoshop or another photo editor. You'll have to play around with the noise reduction settings to get one that works for you.

The key to low light photos is to make sure you get an exposure that isn't blurred, even if you have to use a high ISO. It's easy to remove the noise in software, but blurry photos can't be fixed.

Oct 11, 2009 | Cameras

2 Answers

The night setting results in blurry pictures


The grain is from underxexposure and the blur is from hand shake caused by low shutter speed. Try using a tripod. Also, change from auto settings and shoot in manual mode with a high ISO and low aperture setting. Good luck!

Jul 15, 2009 | Nikon COOLPIX S200 Digital Camera

1 Answer

When on sports setting, my camera shoots slow and blurry when indoors


More than likely, your exposure- specifically your shutter speed settings- are too low. When you have fast action, you must have a higher shutter speed (Higher, meaning that the DURATION of the exposure is less. So, an exposure of 1/250th of a second is more desirable than an exposure of 1/30th of a second when shooting indoor sports. (This difference equates to about 400% more exposure, duration-wise). When shooting sports indoors, a "Fast" lens, meaning that the front of the lens is bigger, which allows more light into the camera at one time. (This normally equates to "F-Stop" settings. So, a 50mm F1.4 lens will be a "faster" lens than a 50mm F2 lens. The lower the F number, the "faster" the lens. This also equates to higher prices...) Another consideration for shooting stop-action sports photography indoors is using higher ISO settings. When you double the ISO number, you cut the amount of light required to make a good exposure in half. So, ISO 200 requires half the light of ISO100, and 400 requires half the light of 200 and so on. Typically, I use a setting of ISO 800 or higher for indoor sports (Which, BTW is my speciality...). The trade-off for using higher ISO settings is that it introduces more noise into the image, which many people find less desirable. I also wrote a few articles for POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY & IMAGING about shooting sports. The "football" article will more than likely be the most help to you. Basically, ALL sports photography is shot the same way, and if you use these techniques, your work will greatly improve. Here is a link to those, and hope they help!

http://www.popphoto.com/Blogs/Sports-Photography

http://www.popphoto.com/Features/Shooting-Talladega-Superspeedway

http://www.popphoto.com/Features/How-to-Photograph-Football

Jul 10, 2009 | Nikon D60 Digital Camera

3 Answers

Blue photos on Nikon D60.


Check your white balance or wb button.

May 04, 2009 | Nikon D60 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Nikon D60 - can not shoot pictures in low light


Quick solution: enable the "auto ISO" setting in the menus. This will automatically recognize low-light conditions, and adjust the ISO accordingly.

Dec 24, 2008 | Nikon D40x Digital Camera

2 Answers

NIKON D70


The higher the ISO setting the more grain in the photo. Have you somehow set the ISO to say, 1600? http://www.nikondigitutor.com/eng/d70s/select.php?menu=1&sub=b11&num=12 Select ISO setting this way: http://www.nikondigitutor.com/eng/d70s/select.php?menu=1&sub=b05&num=10 Are you shooting in low-light situations (typically indoor)? Try shooting bright scenes and Auto mode, or manually set ISO to 100 or 200 and see if noise persists.

Apr 02, 2007 | Nikon D70s Digital Camera

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