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Hi i have a jbl subwoofer sub145.. i have it hook up and it is not give me any sound expect random spurts of bass... please help??

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6 Suggested Answers

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: jbl 12 subwoofer

Winslow is correct. It is likely to be a bad capacitor on the power supply. There should be two large capacitors on the power supply circuit. These capacitors filter the 60Hz waveform from the power. These will be the two largest capacitors in the entire system. The bad capacitor is probably bulging. For safety, you should replace both capacitors with exactly the same uF, voltage, and temperature ratings. Don't use anything smaller than the ratings of the current capacitors. And don't waste your time going to RadioShack, they won't have any big enough capacitors. It would also be a good idea to check any resistors that are near the capacitors, if you see a slightly larger resistor that is burnt, then you will probably want to replace it.

Posted on Jul 01, 2008

MJS_1
  • 150 Answers

SOURCE: Subwoofer probelm

I suspect you have a bad cable, a poor ground or a bad
power supply inside the speaker amplifier. The amplifier
(inside the sub-woofer) could also be defective.
===
1) Bad cable or connector:
If the (braided shield/outer tube) of the coaxial input cable is
not grounded, the cable will pickup line frequency "hum"
from surrounding power lines, house wires, lights and
appliances.

This hum is then amplified by the speaker's amplifier
causing the constant bass sound you speak of.

Because the hum frequency fundamental is 60 Hertz in
North America, 50 Hertz in Europe, you hear it coming
mostly out of the sub-woofer, because the midrange and
high speaker circuits filter it out.

Check the input connectors, cable at both ends, wiggle
the jacks at a low volume setting to see if it changes.

Make sure that you are indeed using a properly shielded
coaxial cable.

A coaxial cable consists of a thin inner conductor, surrounded
by a flexible tube made up of a braided metal shield, which
must be grounded. This prevents hum from being picked up
by the sensitive amplifier inputs.
===

2) If the power supply within the sub-woofer's internal amplifier
is defective, the the power supply hum will also get coupled
into the amplifier and speaker with same results as above.

Power supply hum is typically twice the line frequency,
i.e. 120 Hertz, but not always, depending on what
component failed: Rectifier diode, filter capacitor, or
the voltage regulator.

3) Ground loops:
When you run very long cables between the source and
destination of an audio signal, multiple ground paths (must)
exist between the two points in space, creating complete
loop circuits.

Power line hum from the environment can (will) induce
heavy AC currents around these loops, creating a voltage
gradient across these cables, and in-between the end
devices.

Once again, this AC hum is coupled into the amplifier inputs.

Ground loops become a problem with cables over 10
feet long, and an astronomical problem for stage audio
engineers. To avoid ground loops, they must break
the circuit's continuity by using isolation transformers,
optical isolators, and/or differential input amplifiers.

So how long are your cables?

Most house stereo components are only designed to
handle 6 to 10 feet of cabling max.

30 feet is already asking for major trouble.

4) Feed back oscillation: This occurs when the output of
an amplifier is fed back to the inputs with a round trip
gain greater or equal to unity. The tiniest little electrical
disturbance is then amplified and re-amplified, over and
over again, usually at one preferred frequency, causing
the typical (ear-splitting) microphone squeal or howl.

In your situation feedback and/ loss of original signal
could be the result of mis-wiring the input cables.

Note that this is NOT as silly nor as unlikely as it sounds,
because many computer audio cards and even some
home stereo systems have re-configurable inputs and
outputs.

SOFTWARE configuration decides which jack at the
back does what !!!!

On my computer, for example, the Realtek audio driver
tries to automatically figure out what cable is connected
to each jack (usually it gets it wrong)

Using the Realtek control panel applet, I can then
manually re-configure the gray jack as input,
the green jack as bass, pink jack as center.... etc.

If this situation also applies to your system, please check
the software configuration. Connecting an output cable to
an input jack will certainly cause a lot of HUM and not
much music.

5) Finally, don't rule out internal sub-woofer failure. Unlike
the passive stereo/hi-fi speakers of days gone by, modern
multi-channel theater systems with front, center, rear and
sub-woofer speakers are internally amplified, with active
frequency cross-over filters and special effect/ surround
sound capabilities.

Usually, the large sub-woofer contains most of the
electronics, amplifiers and filters.

It feeds the other speakers, and it is controlled by
an external volume control module which can be separate
or built into one of the tweeters.

These sub-woofer electronics are prone to poor design,
overheating and early failure. (Even fresh out of the box
like yours)

If you cannot get it working, take it back to the store,
and make the NICE salesmen **** with it.

Good luck
Please rate my answers
Martin.

Posted on Jul 21, 2008

Monster80
  • 460 Answers

SOURCE: pb12 makes thumping sound after warming up

Hello there..Thats normal only if your sub volume and the pre amp is turned up..Your amp is the cause of the speaker jump..Turn amp volume sub level down a few and check your wire from sub to amp..If all of that is good is a normal operation for pre amp warm up in sub if level is turn to max..Try unplugging amp freom sub then turn sub on stand alone(just sub outlet plugged in and no wires from base amp plugged in..If sub stops the its the amp making the problem..If it still is there then the pre amp is either dusty on inside or the outlet plug that it is plugged in doesnt have a good ground..Hope these help to solve your problem..Have a great day...

Posted on Apr 03, 2009

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: No Sound from my JBL SCS135 Subwoofer

no sound

Posted on Aug 26, 2009

budmrtn
  • 11361 Answers

SOURCE: JBL PB10 subwoofer sounds distorted and lights on the front flash

More likely to be the Class D power amp module, but you should look through the service manual to make sure all the parts are installed correctly. My PB10 AMP module went out and you cannot get one anymore.
http://manuals.harman.com/JBL/HOM/Service%20Manual/PB10%20sm.pdf

Posted on Nov 10, 2009

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Basically, you need to build/modify an sub enclosure that is suited for the sub, the music you mainly play, and vehicle tuning. Generally, sealed enclosures will provide tighter bass response and get decently loud. Some would argue that it will give you greater sound quality. A ported enclosure will give you a louder more booming sound. That depends also on where the port is tuned (ex. 32 hz, 36 hz, etc ). You need to make sure that the enclosure meets the sub's airspace requirement as well. A customized well made enclosure is just as important as the sub you put in it.

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How do I remove the back of the SUB145 subwoofer


Have you tried to heat the joints with a heat gun. It could loosen the glue enough for you to remove the panel. Be careful not to apply too much heat. Start low on the back so if the heat discolors the veener it will be in a location that will not be seen. Alternatively a utility knife might be able to split the glue in the joint. Hard to tell since there is no picture of the case.

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Can we use the subwoofer as an amplifier for speakers? it has jacks for speaker in/out, but i can't figure out how to make it work because the speakers have no sound.


I don't believe this hookup is amplified; but, if you have used the regular unfiltered speaker connections from your receiver/amplifier to hookup the subwoofer, the system will pass the signal thru the outputs subject to the crossover adjustment on the back panel. You cannot get the full signal if your system is sending only the bass signal to the subwoofer. I have copied the instructions below from the manual. You would set the high freq crossover to the low end of your satellite's frequency range. The full manual is here: http://www.jbl.com/EN-US/Products/Pages/ProductSupportDetails.aspx?PID=PSW-D110

High-Pass Control
• If you hooked up your subwoofer
as shown in Hookup
3 on page 4, you also have
the capability of adjusting
the high-pass frequency.
The High-Pass control
determines the frequency at
which the main speakers
will start reproducing
sounds. If your main speakers
can comfortably reproduce
some low-frequency
sounds, also set this control
to a lower frequency
setting, between 50Hz –
100Hz. This will concentrate
the subwoofer’s
efforts to the ultradeep
bass sounds, while your
main speakers continue to
reproduce the mid-bass
information. If you are
using smaller bookshelf
speakers that do not extend
to the lower bass frequencies,
set the high-pass crossover
control to a higher setting,
between 125Hz – 180Hz.
With this setting, your main
speakers will not have the
burden of reproducing any
low-frequency sounds.
• If you hooked up your subwoofer
as shown in Hookup
1 on page 3, the high-pass
frequency is fixed at 180Hz.
• If you hooked up your subwoofer
as shown in Hookup
2 on page 4, there is no
high-pass control. Unless
your receiver/amplifier
incorporates a high-pass
crossover, your main speakers
will continue to get a
full-range signal.
Final adjustment and blending
of the low-pass and high-pass
controls may evolve over several
listening sessions. A good
starting point would be to set
both the low- and high-pass
controls to the same frequency
and adjust from that point.

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3 Answers

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Are you running the Ipod into its L & R RCA jacks as prescribed?

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Perhaps you could try adjusting the Low Pass up to 180 to see if anything anywhere near the 'real' bass region is present.

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