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Where can I find diagrams for home heating systems ? Electrical and piping

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Hello,

You can find all kinds of diagrams, including both wiring, plumbing (gas and refrigerant) in the installation diagrams for many products. Pay special attention to those systems that are designed to be installed by the homeowner, such as split systems as manufactured by LG, York, etc.

Alternatively, older text books on Heating and Air Conditioning will carry typical and industry accepted (at time of printing) diagrams as examples. You can find the textbooks via search engines. Many college / university libraries will also carry the older text books as well as references.

Posted on Sep 27, 2010

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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My signal lights,cruise control,rear defrost,4x4 on the go nob & no heat. All quit at the same time.Any ideas what to check to fix?


A wiring diagram , look to see if these systems have anything in common , power supply , common ground point . Do you know how to do electrical testing , how to read a wiring diagram . Do you know anything of automotive electrical systems ? How to read an electrical diagram Lesson 1 The Trainer 29 Understanding How Electrical CIrcuits Work and How to Test...

Electric Testing Techniques You Need to Know

http://www.bbbind.com/free_tsb.html free wiring diagrams !


Jan 28, 2017 | Cars & Trucks

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How to Hookup Your Outdoor Wood Boiler


You just bought or a thinking of buying an <span style="font-weight: bold;">outdoor wood boiler.</span> How do you integrate that boiler into your existing <span style="font-weight: bold;">home heating system</span>? The guy selling you the boiler wants the sale and tells you that hooking it into your system is very simple.<br /><br /><span style="font-weight: bold;">Outdoor wood boilers </span>come in many shapes and sizes. For the most part bigger is better for these things. The next thing you need to consider is whether the <span style="font-weight: bold;">boiler is an open or closed system</span>. It does make a difference in the way it gets hooked up. <span style="font-weight: bold;">Closed systems</span> can be hooked right up to your <span style="font-weight: bold;">existing boiler system </span>in a <span style="font-weight: bold;">primary secondary configuration</span>. This means that the wood boiler circulates to two tees in your home system and the home system circulates the water through the home. The two waters mix through the tees.<br /><br />If your wood boiler is an <span style="font-weight: bold;">open system</span> then you need to install a <span style="font-weight: bold;">stainless steel flat plate heat exchanger </span>to divide the two waters. The hookup of the <span style="font-weight: bold;">heat exchanger</span> is not that hard if you follow the instructions properly. This heat exchanger is very effect in<span style="font-weight: bold;"> transferring the heat</span> from the wood boiler to the inside heating system. It also keeps the water of the<span style="font-weight: bold;"> inside system pressurized and isolated.</span><br /><br />If you are installing your outdoor furnace to a <span style="font-weight: bold;">hot air heating system</span> then you need to <span style="font-weight: bold;">buy a coil</span> similar to your car radiator to install in the plenum on the supply side of your <span style="font-weight: bold;">existing hot air furnace</span>. To this coil you will <span style="font-weight: bold;">hookup the water pipes from the outdoor boiler</span>. The water running through the coil will heat it up so that the air going through from the <span style="font-weight: bold;">hot air furnace </span>will be warmed. The water hookup for this style of heat is very simple, but the <span style="font-weight: bold;">electrical hookup of the blower, pump, and circulator </span>may not be as simple. You may need someone with a good electrical knowledge to make everything happen in the right sequence.<br /><br /><span style="font-weight: bold;">Outdoor wood boilers can heat your home effectively </span>if they are <span style="font-weight: bold;">installed to your existing heating system properly</span>. If they are installed properly you will notice no difference in the heating of your home. It will be <span style="font-weight: bold;">warm and comfortable.</span> Make sue that you do your research properly before trying to <span style="font-weight: bold;">install your outdoor wood boiler.</span>

on Feb 21, 2011 | Heating & Cooling

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Hot Water Steam Efficiency Plus Comfort


Steam heat is a great warm, wonderful, and absolutely fabulous way to heat your house. Steam heat is almost always created from water in a boiler fueled by gas, oil or electricity. It then passes through pipes and radiators or convectors to heat your home. A steam heating system uses steam that is generated from a boiler. When the water boils, the steam rises through the pipes and into the radiators to heat them. The hot radiators then heat your home.

Steam is a great heat distribution medium because it moves easily through your system and it has an extremely high heat-holding capacity. The heat-holding capacity of steam is much greater than that of water. Steam heating systems often operate at very low pressures and usually under 220°F. Steam heat is usually distributed by either one or two pipe systems. In a case of a one-pipe steam heating system, a single main serves the dual purpose of supplying steam to the heat exchanger and allowing condensate to run back from the radiators also. A two-pipe system has two connections from each heat exchanger or radiator. In this system, steam and condensate flow in separate piping from each other. With a steam system all pipes must be well insulated and you must use pipe insulation rated for steam piping. If the insulation is removed the system will no longer work as designed. Noise and all sorts of problems will come from uninsulated piping.

When you have radiators on upper floors or radiators that are further from the boiler they should be adjusted to release more air to compensate for the increased air volume in the piping due to the distance from the boiler. If you have a valve that is clogged with mineral deposits or stuck shut, no air will be able to get out of the piping. Because of this no steam can enter the radiator, so it doesn't heat up. This will block the movement of steam into the radiator, or cause a very noisy hammering as pressurized steam tries to get through this water "dam".

Steam radiators need to have a valve that allows air to escape at a controlled rate so that the radiator can heat up. Steam heating systems will also lose a little bit of water all the time, so there has to be water makeup so that you do not run your boiler dry. Steam heating systems without an automatic water feeder are not safe. You will risk serious boiler damage should boiler water be lost. If the boiler runs dry it could also explode if water is placed into it while it is hot. There should always be a low water cutoff installed on every steam system. Therefore on a steam boiler the automatic water feeder serves as a safety device also.

It is very important that you find someone that is very familiar with steam heating systems when repairing or installing steam heating. Incorrectly designed, installed, steam systems and condensate piping is a huge problem in today's buildings and facilities. There are not many qualified to design and install properly operating steam heating systems. Incorrect steam piping will always cause costly premature failure of steam equipment such as steam coils, heat exchangers, and control valves. Not to mention the higher cost of operating a system that is not working efficiently.
http://www.fixya.com/support/r3904286-steam_system_steam_radiator_air

http://www.fixya.com/support/r4008078-differences_between_steam_hot_water

on Dec 29, 2009 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

Wiring diagram


A wiring diagram is a simple visual representation of the physical connections and physical layout of an electrical system or circuit. It shows how the electrical wires are interconnected and can also show where fixtures and components may be connected to the system. Use wiring diagrams to assist in building or manufacturing the circuit or electronic device. They are also useful for making repairs. DIY enthusiasts use wiring diagrams but they are also common in home building and auto repair. For example, a home builder will want to confirm the physical location of electrical outlets and light fixtures using a wiring diagram to avoid costly mistakes and building code violations.
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Sep 01, 2016 | Cooktops

1 Answer

Need to attach ground wire


A good ground is typically a cold water pipe. The cold water pipe is required to be grounded to the electrical service in nearly all buildings. Since cold water pipes are often in contact with hot water pipes in steel sinks, water heaters and furnaces, etc.; a hot water pipe - whether for heat or domestic use will also work. The same holds true for gas piping. Electric appliances fueled with gas have their pipes connected to ground via the electrical cord and electrical service. You could also obtain a "3 wire" cord cap from you hardware store, and connect an wire to the ground terminal of the cord cap, and plug it directly into a grounded electrical outlet to obtain a good ground. If you do not ground the wires, the noise will likely be worse than before at the wire acts like an antenna for other noise sources. You may also have luck connecting to the ground terminal on many of the older amplifiers - as many turntables required ground, too - and this was the method used.

Good luck!

Mar 31, 2014 | RCA Pac Sni1 Rca Ground Loop Noise...

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How to Hookup Your Outdoor Wood Boiler to Your Existing Heating System


Normal 0 MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman";} You just bought or a thinking of buying an outdoor wood boiler. How do you integrate that boiler into your existing home heating system? The guy selling you the boiler wants the sale and tells you that hooking it into your system is very simple.

Outdoor wood boilers come in many shapes and sizes. For the most part bigger is better for these things. The next thing you need to consider is whether the boiler is open or closed. It does make a difference in the way it gets hooked up. Closed systems can be hooked right up to your existing boiler system in a primary secondary configuration. This means that the wood boiler circulates to two tees in your home system and the home system circulates the water through the home. The two waters mix through the tees.

If your wood boiler is an open system then you need to install a stainless steel flat plate heat exchanger to divide the two waters. The hookup of the heat exchanger is not that hard if you follow the instructions properly. This heat exchanger is very effect in transferring the heat from the wood boiler to the inside heating system. It also keeps the water of the inside system pressurized and isolated.

If you are installing your outdoor furnace to a hot air heating system then you need to buy a coil similar to your car radiator to install in the plenum on the supply side of your existing hot air furnace. To this coil you will hookup the water pipes from the outdoor boiler. The water running through the coil will heat it up so that the air going through from the hot air furnace will be warmed. The water hookup for this style of heat is very simple, but the electrical hookup of the blower, pump, and circulator may not be as simple. You may need someone with a good electrical knowledge to make everything happen in the right sequence.

Outdoor wood boilers can heat your home effectively if they are installed to your existing heating system properly. If they are installed properly you will notice no difference in the heating of your home. It will be warm and comfortable. Make sue that you do your research properly before trying to install your outdoor wood boiler.

on Dec 03, 2009 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

Home comfort protection plan


Direct Energy knows that maintaining your Texas home is essential to your family's well-being. You can't afford to put off protection until disaster strikes, so we've created protection for your home's electrical, plumbing, and heating and air conditioning systems.

Our home protection plans deliver security by combining preventive and repair services for your home's most fundamental systems, including:

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Plumbing lines
Priority scheduling with us for all appointments
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Heating and cooling systems


Our home protection plans remove the anxiety of unanticipated costs, while our certified technicians are ready to assist you with respectful, professional service and high-quality equipment. Because we view the money you spend on home service improvement as an investment in your home and your comfort, we're committed to helping you make it worthwhile. You can choose from our plans for Heating and Cooling systems, Electrical wiring, and Plumbing lines. Direct Energy's Repair & Maintenance Essentials Plan provides annual features to catch small service issues before they become critical, $500 insurance for every repair job*, emergency customer support any time you need it, service visits with no charges and no deductibles, and so much more.
if you want protect your roof leaks so you can apply EPDM Coatings :
Watch Corporate Video

Jan 20, 2014 | Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

Fridge freezer, water inlet pipe keeps warming up


The home icemaker's predecessor was the plastic ice tray. It's fairly obvious how this device works: You pour water into a mold, leave it in the freezer until it turns to a solid and then extract the ice cubes. An icemaker does exactly the same thing, but the process of pouring water and extracting cubes is fully automated. A home icemaker is an ice-cube assembly line.

Most icemakers use an electric motor, an electrically operated water valve and an electrical heating unit. To provide power to all these elements, you have to hook the icemaker up to the electrical circuit powering your refigerator. You also have to hook the icemaker up to the plumbing line in your house, to provide fresh water for the ice cubes. The power line and the water-intake tube both run through a hole in the back of the freezer.

When everything is hooked up, the icemaker begins its cycle. The cycle is usually controlled by a simple electrical circuit and a series of switches.

At the beginning of the cycle, a timed switch in the circuit briefly sends current to a solenoid water valve. In most designs, the water valve is actually positioned behind the refrigerator, but it is connected to the central circuit via electrical wires. When the circuit sends current down these wires, the charge moves a solenoid (a type of electromagnet), which opens the valve.

The valve is only open for about seven seconds; it lets in just enough water to fill the ice mold. The ice mold is a plastic well, with several connected cavities. Typically, these cavities have a curved, half-circle shape. Each of the cavity walls has a small notch in it so each ice cube will be attached to the cube next to it.

Once the mold is filled, the machine waits for the water in the mold to freeze. The cooling unit in the refrigerator does the actual work of freezing the water, not the icemaker itself. The icemaker has a built-in thermostat, which monitors the temperature level of the water in the molds. When the temperature dips to a particular level -- say, 9 degrees Fahrenheit (-13 degrees Celsius) -- the thermostat closes a switch in the electrical circuit.

Closing this switch lets electrical current flow through a heating coil underneath the icemaker. As the coil heats up, it warms the bottom of the ice mold, loosening the ice cubes from the mold surface.

The electrical circuit then activates the icemaker's motor. The motor spins a gear, which rotates another gear attached to a long plastic shaft. The shaft has a series of ejector blades extending out from it. As the blades revolve, they scoop the ice cubes up and out of the mold, pushing them to the front of the icemaker. Since the cubes are connected to one another, they move as a single unit.

At the front of the icemaker, there are plastic notches in the housing that match up with the ejector blades. The blades pass through these notches, and the cubes are pushed out to a collection bin underneath the icemaker.

The revolving shaft has a notched plastic cam at its base. Just before the cubes are pushed out of the icemaker, the cam catches hold of the shut-off arm, lifting it up. After the cubes are ejected, the arm falls down again. When the arm reaches its lowest resting position, it throws a switch in the circuit, which activates the water valve to begin another cycle. If the arm can't reach its lowest position, because there are stacked-up ice cubes in the way, the cycle is interrupted. This keeps the icemaker from filling your entire freezer with ice; it will only make more cubes when there is room in the collection bin.

This system is effective for making ice at home, but it doesn't produce enough ice for commercial purposes, such as restaurants and self-service hotel ice machines. In the next section, we'll look at a larger, more powerful icemaker design.

There are any number of ways to configure a large, free-standing icemaker -- all you need is a refrigeration system, a water supply and some way of collecting the ice that forms.

One of the simplest professional systems uses a large metal ice-cube tray, positioned vertically.

In this system, the metal ice tray is connected to a set of coiled heat-exchanging pipes like the ones on the back of your refrigerator. A compressor drives a stream of refrigerant fluid in a continuous cycle of condensation and expansion. Basically, the compressor forces refrigerant through a narrow tube (called the condenser) to condense it, and then releases it into a wider tube (called the evaporator), where it can expand.

Compressing the refrigerant raises its pressure, which increases its temperature. As the refrigerant passes through the narrow condenser coils, it loses heat to the cooler air outside, and it condenses into a liquid. When the compressed fluid passes through the expansion valve, it evaporates -- it expands to become a gas. This evaporation process draws in heat energy from the metal pipes and the air around the refrigerant. This cools the pipes and the attached metal ice tray.

The icemaker has a water pump, which draws water from a collection sump and pours it over the chilled ice tray. As the water flows over the tray, it gradually freezes, building up ice cubes in the well of the tray. When you freeze water layer by layer this way, it forms clear ice. When you freeze it all at once, as in the home icemaker, you get cloudy ice.

After a set amount of time, the icemaker triggers a solenoid valve connected to the heat-exchanging coils. Switching this valve changes the path of the refrigerant. The compressor stops forcing the heated gas from the compressor into the narrow condenser; instead, it forces the gas into a wide bypass tube. The hot gas is cycled back to the evaporator without condensing. When you force this hot gas through the evaporator pipes, the pipes and the ice tray heat up rapidly, which loosens the ice cubes.

Typically, the individual cube cavities are slanted so the loosened ice will slide out on their own, into a collection bin below. Some systems have a cylinder piston that gives the tray a little shove, knocking the cubes loose.

This sort of system is popular in restaurants and hotels because it makes ice cubes with a standard shape and size. Other businesses, such as grocery stores and scientific research firms, need smaller ice flakes for packing perishable items. We'll look at flake icemakers next.

In the last section, we looked at a standard cube icemaker design. Flake icemakers work on the same basic principle as cube icemakers, but they have an additional component: the ice crusher. You can see how a typical flake system works in the diagram below.

Like the cube icemaker design we examined in the last section, this machine uses a set of heat-exchanging coils and a stream of water to build up a layer of ice. But in this system, the coils are positioned inside a large metal cylinder. Water passes through the cylinder, as well as around its outer edges. The passing water gradually builds up a large column of ice surrounding the cylinder from the inside and outside.

As with a cube icemaker, a solenoid valve releases hot gas into the cooling pipes after a set length of time. This loosens the ice column so it falls into the ice crusher below. The ice crusher breaks the ice cylinder into small pieces, which pass on to a collection bin.

The size of the ice bits depends on the crusher mechanism. Some crushers grind the ice into fine flakes, while other crushers produce larger, irregularly shaped ice chunks.

There are many variations on these designs, but the basic idea in all of them is the same. A refrigeration system builds up a layer of ice, and a harvesting system ejects the ice into a collection bin. At the most basic level, this is all there is to any icemaker.


Mercedes Custom parts

Jun 05, 2012 | Kenmore Fridge Freezer Ice Pan Part...

1 Answer

I have a boler heat system in my home. and the pipes are rattling and banging around i the basement when the heat kicks on. i wanted to know what that could be.


You have either air in the pipes or not enough support for the pipes. You will never be able to eliminate all noise because pipes expand and contract each cycle but more support and less air in the pipes may help.

Dec 05, 2008 | Heating & Cooling

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