Question about Microsoft Windows XP Home Edition

2 Answers

Installation stall with 39 minutes remaining

I've reformatted several times (complete, not quick) and now it doesn't even copy all the files to the windows installation folders...42 to be exact, but I click "skip" and it tries to install, as before, but it stops with 39 minutes to go, same as when it did copy "all" files.

I also tried installing on my other HDD in the same computer and the same result; happens with "different" installation disks, too.

Any help will be appreciated, a Microsoft wants to charge me!

Thanks, Gil

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  • gilhow May 23, 2008

    It's a generic (I put it together) AMD 64x2 2.1 Ghz, 2GB memory, 500 GB SATA HD, Gigabyte board (GA M55plus-S3G. It also has 160 GB ATA drive. I have onboard audio, video, but had a GeForce NVidia card in the PCI express slot, an USB 2.0 PCI card, TV card, ethernet card and guess that's it, BUT, I've taken them all out, disconnected my CD drive (leaving in the SATA DVD drive) disconnected my ATA HD, disconnected my USB printer and still nothing is installing past the 39 minutes left. I'm getting two error messages: 1. Isass.exe is missing 2. An invalid parameter was passed to a service or function (this now shows so fast, I can't read it; used to see it more clearly). Also, used to get: cannot find ntldr, but the new OS XPSp2 Home disk I bought today, seemed to fix that, as it hasn't reappeared. Also, I flashed the Bios. Thanks for your interest...I'm beginning to think it may be a form of the sassar virus???
    Gil


  • gilhow May 24, 2008

    Worldvet, thanks for the input. At this point, I'm progressing slowly...I have actually installed one copy of XPHome (a really old upgrade disk I had) on each drive; my 160 GB ATA and my 500 GB SATA. I just downloaded SP2 on the ATA drive. My SATA drive only shows 137 GB, of course, since it was an XP install without service packs. So far, I have not been able to get my OEM disk (with no MS support) to install past the 39 minute barrier, but will try again in a couple of days. You asked if I had virus protection turned off in the BIOS...it's not available in my bios, but I have seen that option in older boards. It wouldn't be a problem, anyway, as I've reformatted both HD's about a million times, so unless it's hiding, it shouldn't be the culprit. The one thing that helped the most seemed to be changing my new memory back to my older memory sticks. Also, I've taken every card out of my PCI slots, disabled everything "onboard" except for my keyboard and mouse (USB), disconnected printer, etc. At this point, I can't even be sure what has helped the most and plan to keep working on it until I can install XPHome SP2 as a fresh install on a newly formatted HD and have an active 500 GB available.

    Gil

  • Glenn Rogers
    Glenn Rogers May 11, 2010

    When I read your post I went through dejavu and have been trying to recall the what and whys of how I resolved the situation when it occurred to me. I too built myself a dual core AMD x64 and installed Windows extended 64 edition and had two sata drives in a raid array but that wasn't the box that caused my dejavu. I work on a lot of machines over the course of any given year and its hard to recall which one. That's why I asked about the devices. Sound like you know what you're doing for the most part to me, by removing everything that windows installs as a device.

    I was thinking it might have been a lack of space on the temporary area of storage Windows uses to work from while installing.

    I would lastly ask if you have bios virus protection off or not but you probably know about that. Otherwise, I'd get a hold of a copy of Hiren's Boot CD and use one of the utilities to do an ACTUAL low level format in case it is a boot sector 0 virus. I had to do that recently with a laptop for a college kid.

    Sorry for your troubles.
    Worldvet


  • Glenn Rogers
    Glenn Rogers May 11, 2010

    Is this a tower PC with peripheral devices installed in the PCI slots? Or, are they all onboard and enabled in the bios setup screens?

    Worldvet


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Install Linux

Posted on Jun 27, 2008

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Sound like the memory then. As we all know its a process of elimination. That said, I've never been able to do a clean install with a USB keyboard and Mouse. I always reverted to a PS2 keyboard and Mouse as those drivers usually need to be installed separately was back from the Windows 95/98 days, but that doesn't mean you shouldn't be able to do so with XP.

Your OEM disk could be bad. All you need is the Product Key, so you could download an iso image and put it on a drive to install from there. All this you probably konw.

Anyway, you are doing everything as I would have done. You should join us here at Fix Ya and become an Expert. Its stimulating to help out with this board as it is extremely challenging, much harder than fielding a phone call.

Good Luck, but you'll do fine.
Worldvet

Posted on May 24, 2008

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www.thebestpcdoctor.com

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