Question about Vivitar 8X22 Compact Porro Classic Series Binoculars

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Mis-aligned lenses I see two  images of the same subject, one higher than the other. Putting a slight twisting force on the  barrels lines up the subject.  How can I adjust without sending for repair?  Thought there was a lifetime warranty on these, is that correct?

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how about not putting the image in the text box? make them separate objects so that they don't overlap.

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which lens are you talking about?

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CAMERA LENSE WILL NOT RETRACT.


Hello
You especially might consider this if the lens barrel appears obviously damaged, bent, or crooked such as from a fall. Try forcing the lens. More people have reported success with this method than with any of the other methods. HOWEVER, there's obviously some potential for damaging your camera by using this method. Variations include gently pulling, rotating, and/or twisting the lens barrel while hitting the power button. Attempt to straighten or align the barrel if it's crooked or twisted. Another variation includes looking for uneven gaps around the lens barrel, and then pushing on the side of the lens barrel that has the largest gap (note pushing the lens barrel all the way in is NOT recommended as it may become stuck there). While doing any of the above, listen for a click that indicates that the lens barrel guide pins may have reseated in their guide slots. If you hear this click, immediately stop and try the camera.
hope it helps, if not take camera to the technician, if so
DO RATE THE SOLUTION
Good Luck

Jan 02, 2011 | Canon IXUS 80 IS Digital Camera

1 Answer

Cannot close lens


Hello
You especially might consider this if the lens barrel appears obviously damaged, bent, or crooked such as from a fall. Try forcing the lens. More people have reported success with this method than with any of the other methods. HOWEVER, there's obviously some potential for damaging your camera by using this method. Variations include gently pulling, rotating, and/or twisting the lens barrel while hitting the power button. Attempt to straighten or align the barrel if it's crooked or twisted. Another variation includes looking for uneven gaps around the lens barrel, and then pushing on the side of the lens barrel that has the largest gap (note pushing the lens barrel all the way in is NOT recommended as it may become stuck there). While doing any of the above, listen for a click that indicates that the lens barrel guide pins may have reseated in their guide slots. If you hear this click, immediately stop and try the camera.
hope it helps, if not take camera to the technician, if so
DO RATE THE SOLUTION
Good Luck

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1 Answer

I dropped my Nikon Action Lookout III binoculars, ...


The same happened to my Mizar 10X25 I tried things like moving the front lenses but then I discovered that most probably the binoculars fell on one of the four corners, this caused the tubes' direction to be twisted. It could be that the left is pointing slightly down or the right is pointing slightly up, which is essentially the same, and which is what happened to mine. You can discover this miss-alignment by watching using both eyes and then close and open one of them the phantom image will appear and disappear. What you have to do is apply a force with your hands twisting the binoculars one tube up and the other down and hold where you can see clear, I just discovered this and it works, I think I should be able to re-align them again, but I haven't faund how to do so. If you find a different solution please let me know here: gregsoli@yahoo.com

May 15, 2010 | Optics

1 Answer

Hi my sony dcr-hc18e camcorder plays back but doesnt record


Hello,
Unfortunately you're going to need to get some repairs done to your device, the reasoning behind the black screen on recording mode is that one of the many pieces responsible for bringing the image from start to finish has become mis-aligned.
It's either going to be the CCD sensor that has shifted or one of the lenses is slightly off angle and is sending the image off into a wall on the inside of the camcorder.
Estimated repair cost is going to be in the range of $200 USD.
Best of luck with this!

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1 Answer

Side out of image


I'm assuming in what follows that you've tried other lenses and only get the problem with this one lens. If you haven't, then it's essential to do this first unless the lens is obviously the problem. If it happens with other lenses then you have a damaged image sensor mounting within the camera body which will need professional attention.

This is a common problem on this particular lens. Normally it's due to the front element of the lens being slightly skewed on the lens barrel and most commonly occurs after the lens has been dropped.

Turn your lens to manual focus and focus to the shortest distance. Set the lens upright on a table and carefully view all around, if the problem is the front element it will lean slightly to one side like a miniature leaning tower of Pisa. If it doesn't, then check again with greater precision using a ruler to measure the distance s between the lens barrel and the focussing ring and a number of opposite points around the circumference. If they're anything but identical then the lens is skewed. If they are identical then the skewed element is buried deep inside the lens and will need professional repair as it's most likely a fault with the moving element used for image stabilisation.

If the tests confirm that the front element is skewed then if you're really careful and lucky you can often jiggle the front element using a firm twisting action back into place. It does take a bit of judiciously applied brute force and if unsuccessful you can make the problem worse, but either way if you don't try then the lens needs professional repair and new internal parts.

I've had this problem on about one of these lenses every month or so for the last year. The brute force repair works in about half the lenses I try it on and normally lasts. On the others a strip down repair usually shows the same range of broken/worn parts as I find on those lenses which clearly are too far gone to attempt the brute force method.

The difference is cost: the brute force repair costs nothing. The proper repair is often economically unviable as it often costs 50% to 70% of the cost of a brand new lens with a warranty.

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1 Answer

Image appears double and slighly off when viewing


I was having a double vision problem with my Barska 10-30X50 zoom, 195FT/100YDS binoculars. One image was always higher than the other. This was tolerable at low zoom, but was further aggravated the more I zoomed in. I found that I could grasp both barrels and twist them in opposite directions (one side up, the other side down) and force the two images to merge--but that was a strain and an unpleasant viewing experience. As an experiment, while looking through the binoculars, I grasped the far end of the right barrel and twisted it on its axis. Nothing happened at first, but after a certain amount of resistance it began to rotate independently of the body. Lo and behold, this shifted the barrel's axis, and the image for that eye moved vertically! I turned it until the two images merged, and now I'm thrilled to say that the problem is solved! I don't have a clue if this would work on any other brand or model, but it's worth a try!

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1 Answer

Ripples appear in the image when photographing an object with fine plaids or stripes. Why is that?


The following describes the symptoms, cause and prevention of the Moire effect. Symptoms of the Moire effect When you are shooting a subject that has a fine regular pattern such as stripes or plaids, a ripple that does not exist on the subject sometimes appears in the image. This effect is called the Moire effect. Why does the Moire effect occur? Digital cameras and camcorders are equipped with imaging devices such as CCD sensors and CMOS sensors that have pixels that are finely aligned horizontally and vertically that convert light into electronic signals. When the pixels and the pattern on the subject overlap slightly misaligned, an interference pattern occurs and a ripple that does not exist on the actual subject may appear. This is the Moire effect. Preventing the Moire effect You can reduce this effect by changing the distance, zoom setting or the angle of the image. If you are using a camera with manual focusing, the Moire effect can be reduced by simply changing the focus slightly. Reference You may find another Moire effect displayed on the LCD of the camera. As this is caused by the aligned pixels on the LCD, this effect does not necessarily appear in pictures you have taken.

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1 Answer

Ripples appear in the image when photographing an object with fine plaids or stripes. How can I fix that?


When you are shooting a subject that has a fine regular pattern such as stripes or plaids, a ripple that does not exist on the subject sometimes appears in the image. An example of this can be seen in the pictures below. The photo on the left shows the fine plaids pattern on the shirt. The photo on the right is a distance shot of the same shirt. In this photo, you can see a ripple that is not visible in the photo on the left. This effect is called the Moire effect. Why does the Moire effect occur? Digital cameras and camcorders are equipped with imaging devices such as CCD sensors and CMOS sensors that have pixels that are finely aligned horizontally and vertically that convert light into electronic signals. When the pixels and the pattern on the subject overlap slightly misaligned, an interference pattern occurs and a ripple that does not exist on the actual subject may appear. This is the Moire effect. Look at the image above. This image shows red cross-stripes and black cross-stripes overlapped slightly misaligned. When you look at the entire image, you find a ripple that differs from either of the patterns. This is the same principle that causes the Moire effect. Preventing the Moire effect You can reduce this effect by changing the distance, zoom setting or the angle of the image. If you are using a camera with manual focusing, the Moire effect can be reduced by simply changing the focus slightly. Reference You may find another Moire effect displayed on the LCD of the camera. As this is caused by the aligned pixels on the LCD, this effect does not necessarily appear in pictures you have taken.

Sep 04, 2005 | Canon GL2 Mini DV Digital Camcorder

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