Question about Vivitar 8X22 Compact Porro Classic Series Binoculars

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Mis-aligned lenses I see two  images of the same subject, one higher than the other. Putting a slight twisting force on the  barrels lines up the subject.  How can I adjust without sending for repair?  Thought there was a lifetime warranty on these, is that correct?

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How do I collimate my binoculars please because they have double vision.


It'll depend a bit on the root of the problem.
You can get double vision from properly aligned binoculars if the optics are too far apart or too close, relative to the spacing of your eyes. you'll need to bend them at the central hinge to make sure that both eyes are centered on the input lenses.

If you're still getting the migraine-inducing double image, they probably got dropped at some point. This can be a wide range of difficulty to fix. Here's what I've done in some past cases with flea market binocs that I bought cheap due to the skewed alignment.

For many binocs, the upper (eyeball end) and/or lower (field end) are screwed to the central body of the binocs, where all the folding optics are to widen the lenses from your eye spacing. If they have been dropped, (or disassembled and put back together sloppy), then they may be cockeyed at one of these joins. Look at each seam to the central body and see if any of them have a gap, especially one that is larger on one side than another. You can then apply firm un-screwing twist and see if it will unscrew. if it will, and before you unscrew it all the way, wash your hands and clear a clean surface to work on. Unscrew the segment, inspect the threads for crud that might have got in while cockeyed. Then visually square up the component and gently screw it back in. if it was mis-assembled, the threads may be a bit gummed, and you'll have to be patient to keep the optic square, and back off and start again if it tries to drag over to cockeyed threading. Once it's square, gently working the thread back into place by turning back and forth a half turn back, 3/4 forward, half back, 3/4 forward, can help the thread recuperate. Eventually, it should screw all the way in, firmly, and be square. No more double vision.

For some models, like my Nikon fixed pocket binocs, there's no zoom and just a focus knob. On my brothers pair, it got cockeyed. In that case, I gently unscrewed the locking rings for the glass on the eyeball side. One of them was loose and the lens was a bit cockeyed. In that case, I removed, it (wearing nitrile gloves), cleaned it with eyeglasses cleaning solution and a microfiber cloth, put it back in, screwed the ring in firmly,and it was good to go.

Bottom line, if you have some basic DIY skills, unscrewing the entry optics, or the optics sections, isn't too big a deal. Just be mindful not to let dust (or worse) get inside while you have things open. You can get a lot of fix just from that much.

Good Luck!

Mar 11, 2015 | Fujinon Mariner WPC-XL Binocular

2 Answers

Focusing problems


Hello Samaro,

This effect is produced when the tho sides of the binoculars are not focusing the same.
Since you sayit is present at long distance, it might be that one barrel is stuck and is not focusing the same as the otherone when you scroll the middle "focuser".

What you can do is open it up and try to clean it, also see if there is something, that is making one of the lenses not move forward as far as the other one.

Good luck,
Dahaka

Jul 28, 2008 | Fujinon CD Binocular

1 Answer

I was given a pair of 10X42 powerview FOV293FT the Prisms seem to have shifted can they be repaired and would this be cost efective Ian South Africa


If there has not been a major blow, it is in most cases straightforward to align that double image.
Begin by looking if any of the eyepieces or front tubes are jammed, if so they need to be straightened or replaced.
Another problem is if something rattles, and if you notice that it affects the double image. It could for example be the prism holders, or the front lens of the eyepieces. If you are lucky it is just the adjustment screws not being properly screwed in, see below, otherwise this problem needs to be taken care of firsthand.
For adjustment of the double image binos come with three more common options. There are in some cases concentric adjustment rings around the front lenses. More frequently on porro binos there are adjustment screws on the prism housing. You find them under the front and rear edges of the rubber fascia. Or with roof prism binos you often adjust the angle of the eyepieces with in that case adjustment screws on their periphery
To adjust you first pull the two tubes apart a little, look then at something with horizontal and vertical lines in the distance, for example a building. The image will look like bino views in a movie film, with two different circular fields of views kissing each other in the middle.
It is easy to see malalignment for horizontal lines as they go from left to right. These are also the most important to adjust. For vertical lines you need to scan left and right and see if the image jumps sideways. This direction is actually not totally necessary to get perfect, the eyes can slightly adjust for this, but at the price of fatigue.
Be careful and make small adjustments at a time. You should be done in a few minutes.

Nov 02, 2014 | Bushnell Binoculars & Monoculars

1 Answer

One image is slightly above the other at all distances. After using the binoculars for even a couple of moments, my eyes are strained. The problem was present when the binoculars were purchased, however...


The oculars are not aligned properly causing double vision. Check on the binoculars to see if there is a place to adjust the alignment of either of the oculars. Look for any loose screws that may cause the two oculars to be out of alignment.
If this is not the case try adding some torque to the binoculars to see if the will adjust to where they will both point in the same direction. The eyes can fuse disparate images slightly but there is a very small range that they can handle. If the two images are separated by more than this small amount it will cause eye strain and double vision.

Feb 13, 2011 | Minolta 10x25 Activa D WP XL Pocket...

1 Answer

I dropped my Nikon Action Lookout III binoculars, ...


The same happened to my Mizar 10X25 I tried things like moving the front lenses but then I discovered that most probably the binoculars fell on one of the four corners, this caused the tubes' direction to be twisted. It could be that the left is pointing slightly down or the right is pointing slightly up, which is essentially the same, and which is what happened to mine. You can discover this miss-alignment by watching using both eyes and then close and open one of them the phantom image will appear and disappear. What you have to do is apply a force with your hands twisting the binoculars one tube up and the other down and hold where you can see clear, I just discovered this and it works, I think I should be able to re-align them again, but I haven't faund how to do so. If you find a different solution please let me know here: gregsoli@yahoo.com

May 15, 2010 | Binoculars & Monoculars

1 Answer

See two images at higher power.


Your binoculars are out of collimation. That means that the optical path needs to be aligned. Binoculars are designed so that the focus point of each barrel is the same over long and as short as possible distances. Binoculars that are properly aligned will still show a double image if you attempt to focus at something close that is too close for the models design. However this is not the same for long distances. The image at a long distance must not be doubled.

If they are under warranty and you haven't damaged them by dropping etc send them for repair to the manufacturer or ask the retailer where to send them.

If you are going to pay to have them fixed get a quote first. Binoculars that are of the zoom variety are not well thought of among binocular officionados as the quality of image degrades at higher magnification. For the price of repair you may be able to source a higher quality non zoom binocular.

Jul 20, 2009 | Sharper Image Spion (AR001)

1 Answer

Mis-alignement between eyepieces


Up close to the eyepieces around the barrels are small screws that you can use to "collaminate" your binocs. The screws aren't meant to be accessed by the owner and most manufacturers cover them up with the material that surrounds the binocs. Of course the binocs in their current state are useless anyhow, so I wouldn't hesitate to peel up the material to look for the screws. If you do it carefully, you can reseat the material anyhow. Then once you locate the small screws, put the binocs on a stand or a table outside. Focus on something far away using one eye. Then using both eyes, you adjust the screw on the other eyepiece while looking through the binocs. Adjust until you get a single image. You can use loctite, or nail polish to "glue" the screw in the final position if it is really loose.

May 07, 2009 | Nikon Action Zoom XL (10-22x50) Binocular

1 Answer

Image appears double and slighly off when viewing


I was having a double vision problem with my Barska 10-30X50 zoom, 195FT/100YDS binoculars. One image was always higher than the other. This was tolerable at low zoom, but was further aggravated the more I zoomed in. I found that I could grasp both barrels and twist them in opposite directions (one side up, the other side down) and force the two images to merge--but that was a strain and an unpleasant viewing experience. As an experiment, while looking through the binoculars, I grasped the far end of the right barrel and twisted it on its axis. Nothing happened at first, but after a certain amount of resistance it began to rotate independently of the body. Lo and behold, this shifted the barrel's axis, and the image for that eye moved vertically! I turned it until the two images merged, and now I'm thrilled to say that the problem is solved! I don't have a clue if this would work on any other brand or model, but it's worth a try!

Apr 06, 2009 | Tasco Sonoma 16-840WA-1 (8x40MM) Binocular

1 Answer

Canon 12x36 is binoculars


Your alignment is out in the vertical. There are two prisms on each side and you want to adjust the lower ( on the right side ) prism so that you correct the image in the vertical dimension. Caution : it doesn't follow that just because the image seems to be out on the right hand side that it is the right side that fas to be adjusted. So be prepared to adjust the other side. Also the best is to adjust little bit on each side until alignment comes right.

Sep 03, 2007 | Canon IS Binocular

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