Question about Cycling

1 Answer

How do i remove the rear gear cogs from the wheel of a mountain bike?

Posted by on

Ad

1 Answer

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    Genius:

    An expert who has answered 1,000 questions.

  • Master
  • 1,788 Answers

You must have a special tool called a cog removal tool, you can buy one from your local bike shop. Or, better still, it is cheaper to have them remove it for you because this is a tool that you will onlyl use probably once and your bike shop will usually only charge their mininum rate. Good luck

Posted on Sep 15, 2010

Ad

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi there,
Save hours of searching online or wasting money on unnecessary repairs by talking to a 6YA Expert who can help you resolve this issue over the phone in a minute or two.

Best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.

Here's a link to this great service

Good luck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Ad

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

3 Answers

Difference between a fixed gear and single speed bicycle?


Single speed bikes are often known as Fixed gear or fixie bikes.
But Most people don't know the difference between a fixie and a single speed bike.
It's all in the hub
Mechanically, the difference is so small that you might not spot it even when you are looking for it. It all comes down to the rear hub and how the single cog is connected to the rest of the drivetrain. Single speeds are fitted with a freewheel cog that rotates freely one way but locks up the other. This means that the cog will turn the rear wheel when you pump those pedals, but then freewheel when the rear wheel starts turning faster than the cog - much like a geared bike.

When it comes to Fixies, it has no mechanism on the hub. The cog is fixed into the hub. If the rear wheel turns, the cog turns, and if the cog turns, the pedals turn with that. I admit the difference is not so small, but one that has a huge effect on how a bike rides and requires some consideration before you decide on a bike.
If you want to know more about Single speed and fixed gear bike
Have look on this
Gear bike review Blog.


fixed gear vs single speed-tkripwits0g0xysiowegigme-5-0.jpg
Best Fixed Gear Bikes In 2018 Enjoy Your Ride On Cool Fixie Bikes

Mar 29, 2018 | Cycling

1 Answer

How do I remove the gear cog from the rear wheel of a mountain bike? I have tried with a freewheel tool, but it wont budge.


Take it to a shop and let them do it, you probably will only pay a minimum charge. We use a bench vise to hold the tool and then put the wheel with the cog on it, then turn the wheel.

Apr 17, 2011 | Cycling

1 Answer

What do they call the plastic disc by the gear cogs on my mountain bikes back wheel and where can i get one


It's a geek disc (kidding). If you lost it, leave it. It's just there for those who have maladjusted rear derailleur Low Limit adjustments, which limit the distance the derailleur can approach the spokes on the lowest gear.

http://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-help/categories/derailleur-systems

Mar 28, 2011 | Cycling

1 Answer

I have a TREK mountain bike with a Shimano combination brake and shifter with an Altus derailleur. It shifts all gears fine but when coasting with my feet on the pedals, the chain goes slack and sags...


Only YOU can evaluate any error you may have made. LOOK at why the chain is slack. Does the rear derailleur pull back to take up the slack? Are you using some ridiculous small chainring, small rear cog combination that allows too much chain to go slack?

Perhaps the freewheel isn't freewheeling and is instead feeding chain forward when you stop pedaling. Walk the bike forward and see if the rear cogs just coast. If not, lube time (internal). take it to a Bike Shop or buy all the special tools and DIY.

http://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-help/categories/derailleur-systems

http://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-help/categories/cassette-and-freewheel-service




Mar 22, 2011 | Cycling

1 Answer

Good evening - I have Shimano Alivio Gears on my Cannondale F6 MTB and the gears are trying to change down a gear on the rear cogs (go to the larger cog) and need adjusting - which screw is the one to...


Neither screw is for mis-shifts. Those are limit screws for the largest and smallest cogs. Tweaking the cable tension will usually bring in the indexing...

http://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-help/rear-derailler-adjustments-derailleur

It sounds like your cable is/was a smidge too tight.

Aug 14, 2010 | Mountain Shimano Alivio Front Bike...

1 Answer

I'm a 60 year old female. Only just learning to ride a bike. Husband been riding for 60 years and doesn't seem to understand my problem! I have a bike with SI-6KT0B gears. I understand the principles of...


Congratulations on learning to ride the bike. I use the rear gears mainly i.e. the gears on the right hand side. Each rear gear makes a little difference so it makes it a little easier to go uphill. (When the chain is on the back smallest cog wheel it's hardest to pedal and easiest on the largest. The reverse is true of the front cog wheels) If you come to a very steep hill you should use the front gears i.e. the lever on the left hand side. This makes a bigger difference to the effort needed to climb a hill. When you have put the front gear into the easiest position, (on the smallest cog wheel) you can still use your rear gears to make it easier still. For going on flat ground or downhill most people keep both sets of gears on the hardest gear. (The front gears on the largest cog wheel and the rear one on the smallest) However there's no rule that says you have to. Use the one that feels you're using just enough energy to turn the pedals and in time you won't have to even think about the gears. I hope this helps.

Aug 09, 2010 | Cycling

1 Answer

Shimano gears


Basically, avoid cross-chaining. That is, the right-most drive chainring with the left-most cogs, or vice-versa. They place excessive sideways torque on the chain (increasing friction and wear) while not prividing any unique gear ratios that a straighter chainline would provide. The rear derailleur may not be able to take up the slack of small-small riding; or your chain length may be sufficiently short that large-large combo will pull the derailleur to far forward, perhaps even damaging it. To illustrate for yourself what crosschaining does, manually shift your bike into the two described extremes then get behind the bike and sight along the top run of the chain. You'll clearly see that it forces two unnecessary sideways bends in the chain. That is really bad for the hardware.

Generally, the large chainring is for high wheel rpm's but low rider torque, so stay toward the same side (medium-smaller cogs) of the cassette in the rear to maintain higher speeds.

Conversely, the granny gear (smallest chainring) is for high torque, low speed conditions and it works best with its same side (medium-larger) cogs on the rear. The middl ring works with all of the cogs in the rear and serves most off-road purposes that don't require extremes of speed or power.

Buy a few bicycle magaizines, visit bicycling.com and read up on shifting and everything else. It's worth it to get it right and ride smarter instead of harder.

Jan 25, 2010 | Cycling

1 Answer

I can not pedal back and the angle of the lower section is at a 45 degree angle more or less


Make sure your rear derailleur is lined up with one of the rings of teeth on your rear gears( cassette ). Also make sure Your chain is riding correctly on one of the front gears on your crank. If you are still unable to back pedal make sure that one of the cogs (gears) in the rear derailleur arm isn't seized. They must both be able to rotate and the chain should pass through them in a backward S pattern. If you still can't back pedal remove the back wheel or move the chain off the cassette to see if the cassette will freewheel. It has to move freely in a counterclockwise direction in order for you to backpedal. Moving in a clockwise direction engages pawls inside the cassette which lock it into a drive situation which propels the bike. If the cassette will not freewheel in a counterclockwise direction you will need to take the rear wheel to a good bicycle shop to have the cassette replaced. It requires a special tool to remove it. Hope this helps.

Aug 06, 2009 | Shimano 09 Xtr M971lc Mountain Bike Rear...

2 Answers

Gears slip


I am a salesman from www.joyguy.com We mainly trade flashlight and other electronics. Feel free to contact us if you ar einterested in it, thanks.

Apr 19, 2009 | Schwinn Mesa Gs Mountain Bike

1 Answer

Slipping while cranking


The rachets in the rear gear cog have gone bad.  Buy a new gear cluster and have it installed on your rear wheel.  about $30

Mar 26, 2009 | Mountain Bike Bmx Fit Gt Haro Chrome...

Not finding what you are looking for?
Cycling Logo

Related Topics:

48 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Cycling Experts

yadayada
yadayada

Level 3 Expert

80339 Answers

Michial Gueffroy

Level 3 Expert

1138 Answers

Andrew Taylor
Andrew Taylor

Level 3 Expert

20907 Answers

Are you a Cycling Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...