Question about Zeiss Classic B/GA 524013 Binocular

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Focus is really hard to turn.

Is there a special lubricant for the focus mechanism that I should use to lubricate them? The binoculars are over 20 yrs old. Would you recommend Zeiss to do this work instead of myself?

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You can have Zeiss do it, or I can do it. I'm a binocular dealer and technician.
James

Posted on Mar 11, 2009

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How to repair focusing


That's a pretty vague question: The focusing mechanism on most binocs is a spiral shaft with a follower - essentially a "jack screw". The threads may be stripped, or the follower may have slipped off the shaft. You can probably remove the end caps from the shaft and disassemble it to resolve. Be careful not to contaminate the lubricated sliding parts with dust/dirt while doing so...

Nov 29, 2014 | Binoculars & Monoculars

1 Answer

Zeiss classic 10x40B focus wheel is stuck. What type of lubricant should I use.


I would suggest a small amount of WD40, applied with a cotton bud.
Hope this helps,

Aug 09, 2011 | Zeiss Classic B/GA 524013 Binocular

1 Answer

I see double image unless I take the lens as close as the binoculars can go


thats how binoculars are. Yours in this case is really strong. the closer you are to something, looking at it, the more magiflyed you going to be. try view things far a distance, really far away. no more double right?
Everything you need to know to become an expert:
on this website: http://www.chuckhawks.com/binocular_basics.htm
It is surprising how many people do not know how to focus binoculars correctly. There are two common focusing systems used in binoculars.
The first is individual eyepiece focus. This system is simple to understand, and easy to manufacture. It also lends itself well to sealed optical tubes, and thus is usually the focusing system used for waterproof binoculars. Individual eyepiece focus means that to focus the binoculars to your eyes, you simply focus the left eyepiece to your left eye and the right eyepiece to your right eye. There is no centrally located focusing mechanism. It is done like this. Look at something in the distance. Close the right eye (or cover the front of the right binocular), and focus the left eyepiece to your left eye. Close the left eye (or cover the front of the left binocular), and focus the right eyepiece to your right eye. You are finished, until you need to look at something at a different distance, in which case you need to repeat the process.
Because individual eyepiece focus is time-consuming, center focus is more common. Unfortunately, very few people understand how to correctly use center focus binoculars. Here is how it is done. Aim your binoculars at something in the distance. Close the right eye (or cover the front of the right tube), and focus the left side of the binocular to your left eye using the center focus control, which is concentric with the pivot shaft between the binoculars. (Note: the left eyepiece itself does not focus on center focus binoculars.) Next, close your left eye (or cover the front of the left tube), and focus the right eyepiece to your right eye. DO NOT touch the center focus control while you are focusing the right eyepiece to your right eye. Now you are finished. What you have just done is adjust the binoculars for your individual eyes. (Practically everybody's left and right eyes are different.) From now on, you only need to adjust the center focus control when you look at things at different distances. Center focus is faster and easier to use than individual eyepiece focus, once you have initially set the binoculars for your eyes.
Binoculars are commonly described by using a pair of numbers, as in "7x50" or "8x25." The first of these numbers refers to the magnification offered by the binocular. Magnification is why most people buy a pair of binoculars. In the examples above, "7x" means the binocular makes whatever you look at appear seven times closer than it does to the unaided human eye. "8x" means the binocular makes whatever you look at eight times closer than the unaided human eye. "10x" makes things look ten times closer, and so on. The first number used to describe binoculars always refers to their magnification. Common binocular magnifications are 6x, 7x, 8x, 9x, and 10x.
There are also variable power (zoom) binoculars, such as 7-21x50. These almost always perform much better at the low power setting than they do at the higher settings. This is natural, since the front objective cannot enlarge to let in more light as the power is increased, so the view gets dimmer. At 7x, the 50mm front objective provides a 7.1mm exit pupil, but at 21x, the same front objective provides only a 2.38mm exit pupil. Also, the optical quality of a zoom binocular at any given power is inferior to that of a fixed power binocular of that power. In general, zoom binoculars are not the bargain they seem to be.
Remember that everything (including movement) is magnified when you look through a pair of binoculars, especially your own shakes and tremors. So the higher the power, the harder it seems to hold the binoculars steady. 6, 7, or 8 power binoculars are easier for most people, even those with very steady hands, to hold reasonably still. The higher powers sound like a good deal, but often result in jiggly, blurred views. This is why 7x binoculars are chosen by so many experts, including the military.
Power affects brightness. Other things being equal, the higher the power, the dimmer the view. And power also affects the field of view of the binoculars. Again, everything being equal, the higher the power, the smaller the field of view. So, as you can see, power must be balanced against other desirable characteristics when choosing binoculars.

May 09, 2011 | Bushnell 240842 Binocular

1 Answer

I have a Minolta Compact II binoculars. I haven't used it for a while and now the focus wheel is stucked. I can barely move it. What can I do? Will "WD-40" solve the problem? Thank you so much...


I just bought a pair of this model and had the same problem. l muscled the focus knob repeatedly right to left and back until it finally began to move ever so slightly but progressively until it rotated freely from stop left to stop right. Very good optics and ficus range complimented by adjustable diopter. Had it not given in to my stubborn strong thumb finger grip efforts, I would have resorted to a solvent lubricant. Glad it wasn't necessary. Mike-Florida

Jan 17, 2011 | Minolta Compact Binocular

1 Answer

10x42WB 15 yrs old and trouble free until now. Centre focus wheel has become 'sticky' and now fails to rotate. I have tried an oil free spray lubricant to no effect. I live in Bermuda where there is no...


They would need to be sent to Swarovski in Absam, Austria for repair.
Swarovski have a lifetime guarantee on all of their binoculars, it's a matter of you getting it to them to effect the repair.
www.swarovskioptik.com.at

Mar 01, 2010 | Swarovski Optik Binoculars & Monoculars

1 Answer

Stiff focus wheel


The number one rule is to never use oil on a binocular!!
I suspect that the multistart thread on the focus arm carrier, which is internal, has become gunged up. This is not an easy repair for a beginner. The rubber has to be removed from the body of the binocular before you can even start to take them apart to determine the fault.
Like any bearing or gear system, the part would have to be cleaned with a degreaser, then reassembled with new lubricant.

Jan 04, 2010 | Pentax PCF WP II (8x40) Binocular

1 Answer

Needs to be openened, cleaned, and lubricated. I had this done about 10 years ago and the company really did nothing,even put some internal screws outside and outside screws inside. At this point the glass...


sounds like a good old dog...some of the stuff made today are toys...have repaired many nikon and the quality of the lense is worth cost of repairs...if i can help further contact capecod389@aol.com

Nov 28, 2009 | Nikon Binoculars & Monoculars

1 Answer

The adjustment knob was very hard to turn. Any way to lubricate?


I would be inclined to use a penatrative aerosol lubricant (like WD-40) in very sparse quantities. Squirt a little in using the WD40 smart straw applicator to direct the lube accurately and work the adjuster back and forth in a small section. Repeat this until you have freed up the adjustment from one end of its scope to the other. The focal adjustment is typically housed separately to the lenses and careful application of the lube should not affect them - avoid overusing the lube and have a mopup cloth under the spray zone to keep overspray/drips to an absolute minimum.

Aug 18, 2009 | Bushnell ImageView 111025 Binocular

1 Answer

Differnt focus for each eye?


All binoculars (except some really cheap rubbish) have a different focus for each eye. There are two types. Binoculars that have two individual eyepieces that turn and no center focus wheel. This is common to military, astronomy and binoculars used at sea.

The other is the usual center focus binoculars that have a wheel between the two barrels. They will also allow either the left or right eyepiece to turn to focus for one eye. The reason is that manufacturers take into account that each eye is slightly different.

Jul 04, 2009 | Binoculars & Monoculars

1 Answer

Stiff focussing wheel on Zeiss binoculars


like me and you with age we all get stiff...sounds like it has been used alot and needs regreasing. the focus wheel on the zeiss is a double washer type and that it why it is stiff, sometimes the washer between the two focus knobs gets broken....but im sure thats not it...just needs a little tlc ..if i can help any further give me a call @15082549726....surprised zeissman didnt answer thi

Apr 10, 2009 | Binoculars & Monoculars

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