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I have 27 speed specialized road bike can't get it out of the middle ring into the larger ring

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Take it in for a tune up and get the stretch out of the cables. You have a decent bike shop quality bike and it would be worth your while to have running up to peak performance. Kind of like a car, if something is loose, it does not fix itself.

Posted on Sep 13, 2010

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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Giant advanced defy 1 carbon frame. then ride bike can feel every bump in the road.


You have a very expensive, high-performance road bike. It is built for speed, not comfort. If a slightly larger width tire would fit that would give you some relief, as would a suspension seat post.

Mar 16, 2017 | Giant Cycling

1 Answer

Bike developed a wobble, has side to side movement in front wheel


First check the tire-pressure, then the fork oil; see if the wheel has a loose bearing play.

Speed Wobble - When The Bike Shakes Its Head - Cycling ...

cyclingtips.com.au/2011/.../speed-wobble-when-the-bike-shakes-its-head...
Speed wobble is the term used to describe a quick oscillation of the handlebars ... 2 A scenario seen relatively often is that the top tube of the bike is under-built.

Road Bike High Speed Wobble 1st person view ( Shimmy ...

? 1:27
www.youtube.com/watch?v=hMNFS2ap3fU

Jun 23, 2014 - Uploaded by Aurimas Petraitis
Road Bike High Speed Wobble 1st person view ( Shimmy ) .... causing my bike to be so twitchy on descents ...

Oct 30, 2015 | Motorcycles

2 Answers

I shift into a low gear going up hills, can barely pedal the bike at all. I have a brand new columbia comfort women's 16" northway bike.


Hills are not meant to be climbed at a fast pace. The lower gears make it easier for you to convert your pedal movement to tire rotation so this is why you seem to be not going anywhere. Try a higher gear so that easier pedals make less tire movement allowing you to climb hills with ease. Practise on flat ground till you get used to the gearing then always remember to have the right gear selected before you encounter the hill or your climb will be just as tough.

Your gears work like this: The bigger the chain ring on the front where your pedals attach makes for faster speed and is accompanied by harder pedalling. The bigger the chain ring on the back where it is attached to the wheel makes for easier pedalling and less speed. Remember to never use the opposite rings. Eg. Do not use the largering on front with the large ring on back. You will over stress your chain and could break.

Try this, leave the front chain on the middle ring and only use the rear drailleur and get use to the range this set of rings has before you change what front ring you are using.

Happy biking and I hope this helps.

Sep 10, 2011 | Cycling

1 Answer

I need to change the rear gear sprocket, but don't know what speed the mountain bike is. How can I tell what speed the bike is.


Count the cogs, duh. You're going to need some help even after you know if it's 6-, 7-, 8, 9- or 10-speed in the rear. Special tools and 'how-to' knowledge. Take it to a Bicycle Shop an experienced DIY cycling friend.

http://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-help/categories/cassette-and-freewheel-service

Sep 01, 2011 | Cycling

1 Answer

I have a 9 speed 12-25 shimano tiagra cassette. I want a gear that is lower than 25 and want to keep the 25. Can I remove the 14 and add a 26 or 27


NO. It's prohibitively expensive to swap individual cogs on cassettes and the ends are fixed anyway.

Look at this picture http://shimano105.com/2779/shimano-cassette-9-speed/

The largest 3 cogs are riveted together as are the next 2 cogs.

Cassettes can have up to 34-tooth low gears. 12x27 is a common size. Mountain bike sizing is next and it involves someothing more like 11x32 or 34.

Your rear derailleur, if it's a short-cage, may not be able to handle a much larger cog. Do some online research for the largest cog it can accomodate.

You don't say what size chainrings (or how many) you have. Compact cranksets run 50x34 or 36 up front, which makes a huge difference if you're coming from a 52x42 or 52x39 setup. I converted one of my bikes to compact and it's my favorite hilly-ride bike now.

Consult a bike shop because some special tools and skills are required. And web search for 'how to' just about anything.

http://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-help

Aug 23, 2011 | Shimano Cycling

1 Answer

I am need of new tires. The rims are Mavic, but I’m confused about sizing. The tire is a tubular. I think the size is 27 inch. How to I make sure I get the right size?


If you have a tubular tire (also called a sew-up), and you know that you have full-size wheels (either 700c or 27 inch), you need a 700c tubular. Tubular tires only come in a few sizes and the most common is the 700c. A tubular tire is a unique type of tire that usually has a tube sewn inside. This gives the tubular a round cross section and means that it must be glued onto the rim.

700c and 27 inch are actually different sizes (27 inch is slightly larger diameter than 700c), but they're often confused because they're so close and they're both found on road bikes - or have been over the years. These days, the common road-bike wheel and tire size is 700c. But, people still sometimes mistakenly refer to it as 27 inch, which was popular 25 to 30 years ago.

So, the bottom line is, if you get a tubular called a "27 inch" or "700c," it will be the same size and it will fit your wheel just fine. The size that you don't want is "650c." That size will be too small for your wheels. If you have something besides a tubular tire (if your tires aren't glued onto the rims, you don't have tubulars), to determine the size simply look carefully at the sidewalls. You'll find the tire size marked there if you look closely.

Dec 21, 2010 | Cycling

1 Answer

Shimano gears


Basically, avoid cross-chaining. That is, the right-most drive chainring with the left-most cogs, or vice-versa. They place excessive sideways torque on the chain (increasing friction and wear) while not prividing any unique gear ratios that a straighter chainline would provide. The rear derailleur may not be able to take up the slack of small-small riding; or your chain length may be sufficiently short that large-large combo will pull the derailleur to far forward, perhaps even damaging it. To illustrate for yourself what crosschaining does, manually shift your bike into the two described extremes then get behind the bike and sight along the top run of the chain. You'll clearly see that it forces two unnecessary sideways bends in the chain. That is really bad for the hardware.

Generally, the large chainring is for high wheel rpm's but low rider torque, so stay toward the same side (medium-smaller cogs) of the cassette in the rear to maintain higher speeds.

Conversely, the granny gear (smallest chainring) is for high torque, low speed conditions and it works best with its same side (medium-larger) cogs on the rear. The middl ring works with all of the cogs in the rear and serves most off-road purposes that don't require extremes of speed or power.

Buy a few bicycle magaizines, visit bicycling.com and read up on shifting and everything else. It's worth it to get it right and ride smarter instead of harder.

Jan 25, 2010 | Cycling

2 Answers

Clueless


The rear cassette is only a part of the solution. The front gearset also comes with a variety of ring/teeth configurations.
Plenty on new bikes come with a 'compact' gearset (2 front rings, 10 speed rear cassette). That is generally a lower gear ration to aid in hill climbing.
The rear cassettes are easily interchanged (must be same brand as what the hub uses). Of the 3 you listed; the 11-26 would be "Fastest".

If you want to go fast, and are fit enough to power it at speed for a good duration... look for a large crank ring (greatest number of teeth) and a small cassette # (like the 11-26 you listed). It's a sinple ratio calculation. What you're looking for is the most amount of rear wheel rotations per crank rotation. That is achieved by a big (lots of teeth) front ring and a small (not many teeth) rear cassette ring.

While at the bike store, put the bike in it's highest gear (biggest ring on the crankset, smallest ring on the wheel cassette). Lift the rear wheel off the ground and count the amount of rear wheel rotations for 1 crank rotaion.

A triathalon/time-trial bike will come with a ratio of about 5.5-6.5 rotatotions of the rear wheel for each rotation of the crank.
An endurance road bike (with compact gearset) might come with about 4.25 rear wheel rotations for each crank rotation.

Tri/TT bikes are made to put the rider in the most areodynamic position possible thereby reducing the wind drag and making pedaling easier (so you can manage a higher gear ratio). Endurance road bikes are designed to put the rider in a confortable position (more upright) for all day riding.

Get the bike shop to fit you properly to the bike you choose, not all shops offer this. There are professional bike fitters that can help you when you get close.

Hope that helps

Apr 30, 2009 | Sram 850 8 Speed Cassette 11-32t Mountain...

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