Question about Apple PowerBook G4 Mac Notebook

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My screen locks up and kind of pixelates. You can still see the screen image, but its covered by large, pixel looking blocks. The only way to get it to go away is to hold down on the power button to force it to shut down.

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Hook the thing up to external monitor to see if you get the same results. Same results means your graphics video chip is toast. Which means you gots to get the logic board replaced or repaired.

Posted on Oct 06, 2010

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Why possible is 300 dpi printing images and text matter


What is DPI PPI and Why Do They Matter
To some extent, we're all photographers these days. With a camera on every phone and digital SLRs coming down in price, we've all got a trove of photos waiting to be shared. When it comes time to share online, print, or email our favorite images, many are unsure about how to set the image's resolution...
If you've found yourself in this spot, don't worry - dots per inch (shortened to DPI from here on out) is a concept that even confounds some professional graphic artists. Here's a primer DPI so you can stop worrying about technology and start sharing your photos.
Getting started
Digital photos are comprised of pixels, much like the individual boxes on a sheet of graph paper. DPI tells you how small those pixels will be when the image is printed. For example, "300 dots per inch" means that 300 pixels fit across each inch. If your photo is 600 pixels tall by 900 pixels wide, for example, it would come out at 2" x 3" inches if you were to print at 300 DPI. Keep in mind that most digital photos are several thousand pixels in either direction, but for the sake of simplicity, we'll use the more manageable 600 x 900 pixels.
Separating pixels from presentation
It's important to separate DPI from the raw pixel dimensions, and this is where even the pros slip up. DPI is not an indication of image quality or clarity. When you print that 600 x 900 pixel image at 300DPI, it'll likely look pretty sharp, because every inch is densely packed with pixels.
Now imagine printing that same image, with the same number of pixels, at a mere 30 DPI. As each inch would have only 30 pixels across, the density drops immensely and the image prints much larger: 20" by 30". What was once sharp now appears blurry, because each individual pixel is now ten times larger than before. By separating DPI from actual pixel count, we can understand that raising DPI doesn't magically improve a photo. DPI simply takes the same data (the original pixels) and alters how we'll view them.
Pin it It's all about context
Another factor is viewing distance. Just think of the eye chart at your doctor's office. If you're a bit nearsighted, the tiny letters at the bottom are illegible specks, while the letters at the top are easily discerned. In actuality, each tiny letter may be half an inch tall, but the distance makes them seem microscopic. Now consider our 600 by 900 pixel image. When we printed it at 30 DPI, the giant pixels made it look blurry. Were we to look at it across the doctor's office long hallway, however, it may look just as sharp as the 300 DPI print did in our hands. This illustrates how DPI is more about context than quality.

Pin it Pixels Per Inch
You'll notice I've been talking about DPI in relation to printing only. This is because while printers can produce a variety of DPI settings, a computer display's resolution is fixed - its pixel density is part of the physical hardware, and cannot be altered. When talking about displays instead of print, most use the term PPI, or "pixels per inch."
If you intend to put your 600 x 900 pixel image online, switching the resolution to 30, 300, or 3000 PPI is completely arbitrary, because the computer display can't change its density. As modern desktop displays usually have a PPI in the low 100s, the 600 x 900 pixel image will appear around 6" by 9" (mobile displays may be much higher). Of course, your web browser could display the image smaller if need be, but it will do so by averaging and eliminating pixels, not squeezing them to be physically smaller. This is why it's always important to keep your end goal in mind when working with images.
In summary:
• An image is defined by its pixel dimensions - # pixels tall by # pixels wide
• DPI/PPI determines the scale and pixel density at which image will be displayed
• What appears blurry from close up may look fine at a distance, so consider how an image will be seen
• Printers can produce a range of DPIs, while displays have fixed resolution
Whether you're a blogger dealing with an upload limit or are just trying to print a photo to hang on the wall, understanding DPI/PPI can go a long way. I hope these tips help you feel more in control of your images and how you share them with the world!


Oct 07, 2014 | Canon LASER SHOT LBP-2900 Printer

1 Answer

What is the relation between megapixels and maximun enlargement size


The number of pixels (measured in megapixels only because there's so many of them, the number would be very long if they didn't shorten it down; much like saying gigabyte for hard drives, instead of bytes) directly correlates to how much data has been recorded for a particular image.

Photos aren't "drawn" with lines (which is known as a vector image). They are recorded in pixels (raster image), and each pixel is just a single dot of a single color at a specific place in that photo.

When you look at that photo at a very small size (such as on your monitor), the computer "interpolates" (a fancy word for "guesses") which pixels to hide from view, and kind of remixes the other colors on the screen so it looks like the original photo. (Kind of weird, but it's true.)

The photo is "perfect" when it is the full size (one pixel on-screen to one pixel in-photo ratio). No interpolation is done, so you see exactly what you photographed.

If you enlarge a photo beyond the number of pixels you have, you again have to do interpolation, where the computer has to "guess" which color pixels would blend properly between the real pixels in the gaps that are created when it's stretched beyond what data is there.

So, to answer your question:

The direct relationship is this: If you have too few pixels (as rated in megapixels), and you enlarge the photo too much, then there's too much guesswork done by the computer. It is just kind of filling in colors, and this makes the photo look blurry. It can't create detail where no detail existed before.

The more pixels you have, the larger the print you can make WITHOUT enlarging (or interpolating) it. This makes the result very crisp indeed, because all of the pixels are coming from the photo, not from the guesswork of the computer. Even if you are only enlarging it a small amount, it's going to be infinitely better than enlarging it a larger amount. The more interpolation, the fuzzier it gets.

Oct 02, 2014 | Nikon D750 DSLR Camera Body Only

1 Answer

Why won't facebook resize my new cover picture?


Cover photos are 851 pixels wide and 315 pixels tall. If you upload an image that's smaller than these dimensions, it will be stretched to this larger size. The image you upload must be at least 399 pixels wide and 150 pixels tall. But if you have an image of high resolution, you must first edit it using Photoshop or any image processor.

Jun 23, 2014 | Facebook Social Network

1 Answer

Blotted screen in my hp laptop


1.Locate the problem pixel. Display a true black image on your HP's monitor. You can do this by playing a DVD on your HP laptop, and pausing it on the black screen just before the movie starts. Once you bring up a black image on screen, the stuck or dead pixel should be visible.
2.Try applying direct pressure to the problematic pixel. After you've located it, turn off your laptop. Place a soft cloth or rag over the pixel to avoid damaging your screen. A soft chamois works well. Using the tip of a pen, apply gentle pressure to the pixel. You don't need to press hard, as too much pressure can crack or scratch your screen. While applying pressure, boot up your laptop. This should force the pixel to begin working properly.
3.Tap the pixel. With your Toshiba booted up and an image on the screen, gently tap the pixel with the rounded end of a pen cap. Tap hard just hard enough to see a small white flash on the screen. Tap your HP's screen until the pixel begins working properly.
4.Download a stuck pixel program. Several programs, including JScreenFix, UDPix and Pixel Protector, are available for download and can help fix a malfunctioning pixel. These programs display rapidly changing colors and images on your screen. The flashing colors and images can force the pixel to begin functioning properly.
5.Contact HP. If none of the above methods work, your screen may have a pixel that is truly dead. If that's the case, the only option is to replace the display completely. Contact HP customer support at www.hp.com to find an authorized repair service near you.

Sep 19, 2011 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

An 'etch-a-sketch' - type image that at quick glance, looks like an elephant, appears in the upper right section of the screen. It isn't captured with print screen. Swapped out monitors to different CPUs....


I did see a similar issue with a Gateway display, the source of the image was the screen is damaged by the cover inside the screen. Basically, the inside frame was scratching the back of the screen making the image to appear until it damages the screen enough to turn off pixels.

Another possible cause are: "burned pixels", some kind of damage (liquids inside the display), the display was hit, or something like that.

The only solution is to replace the display or use it until is breaks (but it will be quite annoying).

Mar 29, 2010 | NEC MultiSync LCD1765 17" Flat Panel LCD...

1 Answer

Picture Image Becomes Blury When Recording


i had the same problem i just gave the camera a good smack and it was all good. lol

Apr 19, 2009 | Sony Handycam DCR-TRV38 Mini DV Digital...

2 Answers

ACER 3023 SCREEN PIXELATING


Try uninstalling and reinstalling the video drivers. If this doesn't work, it's likely that the LCD control board or cable is damaged.

Feb 13, 2008 | Acer Aspire 3000 Notebook

1 Answer

Replaced LCD Screen


There 2 diffrent LVDS connectors normally on the monitor. a plat one with contacts on one side and a female connector that accepts pins on the end. I would make sure the connectors match. If that does not fix it I would change out the logic board. Check www.lcdrepair.us for instruction videos and parts for that unit.

Sep 01, 2006 | Dell E173FP 17" LCD Flat Panel Monitor

1 Answer

Ultrazoom pixellation problems


No, it isn't to do with white balance. Instead it is due to a combination of noise swamping (or at least modifying significantly) the exposure measured by the pixel, and the interpolation algorithm in the sensor processing chips that "guesses" the colour of a pixel based on the readings from nearby pixels. These algorithms are better at rendering certain kinds of image elements than others. Large areas of darkish colour often fool the algorithms into attempting to produce detail that doesn't exist.

Sep 13, 2005 | Olympus Camedia C-740 Ultra Zoom Digital...

2 Answers

Dpi issues with the s40


Do not be too bummed out. The DPI reported in the EXIF data does not mean all that much. What does matter is the total number of horizontal and vertical pixels in an image and how this relates to the output size. For instance, your camera is capable of producing a 2304 by 1728 pixel image. This works out to about 220 DPI when printing an 8 by 10 inch picture. If you look at this the other way around, image editors will indicate an image size of 32 by 24 inches for an image taken by your camera (2304/72 and 1728/72). It is doubtful you will print at this size. Image software will take advantage of the full resolution when printing an 8 by 10, or 11 by 14.

Sep 08, 2005 | Pentax Optio S40 Digital Camera

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