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My Hoya Zoom binoculars (8X-14X50) are dated from the 1970s. My problem is that the zoom mechanism appears to be jammed. I am looking for a solution to my problem, basically a home repair. Thanks

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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SOURCE: no zoom function on a kalimar power zoom scope,

I HAD THE SAME PROBLEM WITH MY KALIMAR POWER ZOOM. I CLEANED THE BATTERY COMPARTMENT AND THEY WORK FINE NOW. HOPE THIS HELPS.

Posted on Jul 19, 2009

  • 7 Answers

SOURCE: I have an old tasco 7x-15x35 zoom binocular.

You'll need to measure your eyepiece in "mm". Also determine if your eyepiece has an outer ring the eyepiece will slip over. You can find eyecups/guards on Ebay. Search under Binocular Eyecup or Binocular Eye Guard. There are also eyecups under "rubber eyecups/rubber eyeguards" but alot of these are for Microscopes and may not fit. You will need to pay close attention to the mounting type and measurements.

Posted on Mar 20, 2010

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: Minolta Compact AF 8 binocular continually focussing

My Binos are doing the same thing, I think it is some fixed mode it is stuck in. Anyone know how to get is back to normal working? Maybe the big AF button is stuck on?

Help please as I can't find my instruction manual.

Posted on Jun 03, 2011

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I DON'T HAVE A PROBLEM; i'M JUST LOOKING FOR INFORMATION/OPINIONS ON THE COBRA DCA1650 DIGITAL 16MP 8X ZOOM CAMERA.


Think you'll be very disappointed in image quality and just overall quality of the camera. And I'm pretty sure that 16MP will be interpolated 16MP, and that 8x zoom will include some digital zoom enhancement, neither of which are desirable. If you're looking for a good quality low cost camera that will take great pictures, consider this, or this, or this.

Jun 27, 2011 | Cameras

1 Answer

I see double image unless I take the lens as close as the binoculars can go


thats how binoculars are. Yours in this case is really strong. the closer you are to something, looking at it, the more magiflyed you going to be. try view things far a distance, really far away. no more double right?
Everything you need to know to become an expert:
on this website: http://www.chuckhawks.com/binocular_basics.htm
It is surprising how many people do not know how to focus binoculars correctly. There are two common focusing systems used in binoculars.
The first is individual eyepiece focus. This system is simple to understand, and easy to manufacture. It also lends itself well to sealed optical tubes, and thus is usually the focusing system used for waterproof binoculars. Individual eyepiece focus means that to focus the binoculars to your eyes, you simply focus the left eyepiece to your left eye and the right eyepiece to your right eye. There is no centrally located focusing mechanism. It is done like this. Look at something in the distance. Close the right eye (or cover the front of the right binocular), and focus the left eyepiece to your left eye. Close the left eye (or cover the front of the left binocular), and focus the right eyepiece to your right eye. You are finished, until you need to look at something at a different distance, in which case you need to repeat the process.
Because individual eyepiece focus is time-consuming, center focus is more common. Unfortunately, very few people understand how to correctly use center focus binoculars. Here is how it is done. Aim your binoculars at something in the distance. Close the right eye (or cover the front of the right tube), and focus the left side of the binocular to your left eye using the center focus control, which is concentric with the pivot shaft between the binoculars. (Note: the left eyepiece itself does not focus on center focus binoculars.) Next, close your left eye (or cover the front of the left tube), and focus the right eyepiece to your right eye. DO NOT touch the center focus control while you are focusing the right eyepiece to your right eye. Now you are finished. What you have just done is adjust the binoculars for your individual eyes. (Practically everybody's left and right eyes are different.) From now on, you only need to adjust the center focus control when you look at things at different distances. Center focus is faster and easier to use than individual eyepiece focus, once you have initially set the binoculars for your eyes.
Binoculars are commonly described by using a pair of numbers, as in "7x50" or "8x25." The first of these numbers refers to the magnification offered by the binocular. Magnification is why most people buy a pair of binoculars. In the examples above, "7x" means the binocular makes whatever you look at appear seven times closer than it does to the unaided human eye. "8x" means the binocular makes whatever you look at eight times closer than the unaided human eye. "10x" makes things look ten times closer, and so on. The first number used to describe binoculars always refers to their magnification. Common binocular magnifications are 6x, 7x, 8x, 9x, and 10x.
There are also variable power (zoom) binoculars, such as 7-21x50. These almost always perform much better at the low power setting than they do at the higher settings. This is natural, since the front objective cannot enlarge to let in more light as the power is increased, so the view gets dimmer. At 7x, the 50mm front objective provides a 7.1mm exit pupil, but at 21x, the same front objective provides only a 2.38mm exit pupil. Also, the optical quality of a zoom binocular at any given power is inferior to that of a fixed power binocular of that power. In general, zoom binoculars are not the bargain they seem to be.
Remember that everything (including movement) is magnified when you look through a pair of binoculars, especially your own shakes and tremors. So the higher the power, the harder it seems to hold the binoculars steady. 6, 7, or 8 power binoculars are easier for most people, even those with very steady hands, to hold reasonably still. The higher powers sound like a good deal, but often result in jiggly, blurred views. This is why 7x binoculars are chosen by so many experts, including the military.
Power affects brightness. Other things being equal, the higher the power, the dimmer the view. And power also affects the field of view of the binoculars. Again, everything being equal, the higher the power, the smaller the field of view. So, as you can see, power must be balanced against other desirable characteristics when choosing binoculars.

May 09, 2011 | Bushnell 240842 Binocular

1 Answer

The zoom lever is not working moves but doesnt change


If the zoom lever is not working then I would recommend buying a new pair without a zooming mechanism. Zoom binoculars are more trouble than they are worth. Sorry!

Feb 20, 2010 | Minolta Classic II Binocular

1 Answer

Zoom lens loose in tasco binoculars


Best to take this to a repair agent as there are inherent problems in trying to fix these by yourself. Main one being zoom registration between both sides of the binocular.

Jan 28, 2010 | Tasco Zoom 16-72140-1 (7-21X40) Binocular

1 Answer

Value of the model 172 Jason Binoculars


I'm sorry to say this. Not much. Maybe 30 dollars US on a good day on the auction site if the binoculars are in great condition. Zoom binoculars are not known for their quality optics. Jason binoculars have a small collectable quality in a niche market for old Japanese optics. Just to have not for their optics. Non zoom older Jasons are worth a small amount more.

Aug 23, 2009 | Nikon Superior E Binocular

1 Answer

Image appears double and slighly off when viewing


I was having a double vision problem with my Barska 10-30X50 zoom, 195FT/100YDS binoculars. One image was always higher than the other. This was tolerable at low zoom, but was further aggravated the more I zoomed in. I found that I could grasp both barrels and twist them in opposite directions (one side up, the other side down) and force the two images to merge--but that was a strain and an unpleasant viewing experience. As an experiment, while looking through the binoculars, I grasped the far end of the right barrel and twisted it on its axis. Nothing happened at first, but after a certain amount of resistance it began to rotate independently of the body. Lo and behold, this shifted the barrel's axis, and the image for that eye moved vertically! I turned it until the two images merged, and now I'm thrilled to say that the problem is solved! I don't have a clue if this would work on any other brand or model, but it's worth a try!

Apr 06, 2009 | Tasco Sonoma 16-840WA-1 (8x40MM) Binocular

4 Answers

No zoom function on a kalimar power zoom scope,


larry389's so-called solution is not a solution... just an opinion to which each individual is entitled... even when not correct! I've used a Zeika Opt. Co. Power Zoom Binocular No.25361 for over 25 years since inheriting them from my father who purchased them in early 1970. To say the least, treated carefully and with respect for the delicate instrument that they are, they've been wonderful and still work perfectly fine. Perhaps Larry's experience is based upon handling them like junk and, therefore, reaping what he has sewn.

Jan 21, 2009 | Optics

1 Answer

I would like to know where to send my husbands Minolta zoom 19514845 to be repaired. It is called a Minolta zoom stanard zoom, 8x-20x50, 3.1 degrees at 20x. The zoom does not work. You can focus without...


sorry to give you bad news , but most zoom binoculars are not worth cost to repair, they are made of either a small steel band or tiny metal gears to enable both sides to work simultaneously, once they are broken it is almost impossible to find matching parts. sorry....larry@reichinstruments.com

Dec 29, 2008 | Optics

3 Answers

Fuji Zoom Error Message


drop it on the floor from a few feet I did this and now mine works

Aug 02, 2008 | Fuji FinePix A820 Digital Camera

2 Answers

Binocular software


I would contact Radio Shack support (in Canada: The Source by Circuit City thesourcecc.ca ) for a replacement manual.

On a side note, how is the quality of this camera? Does it actually take pictures at full 8x optical zoom?

Apr 11, 2008 | Optics

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