Question about Sony WEGA KE-42M1 42 in. HD-Ready Plasma Television

2 Answers

Screen did not go black, but faided, can still see picture, but looks darker as if you turned the brightness way low. Have to say sharpness is low as well.

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  • jjterrell52 Sep 09, 2010

    The TV is 4 or 5 years old. adjusting brightness and sharpness does not make the picture better, but worse. Watching a few nights ago, and all of a sudden the picture went to a darker faded look. It is Hooked to satalite and a WII. Disconnect Wii has no effect. can see the picture, read advertisements, only really dark and not a vivid contrast.

  • jjterrell52 Sep 11, 2010

    No noticeable puffed Capacitors. With the only connection to the TV is the power cord, the TV will turn on for about 6 seconds or so and the the light will turn from green to red and will start blinking. The voltage when turned on at CN 603, output side, is -0.614 volts DC a few seconds latter, the red light comes on (the ON OFF switch) starts to blink. The voltage at that point goes to 82 volts DC and starts droping. Using a Fluke 87 III to measure the voltage.

  • jjterrell52 Sep 11, 2010

    Thanks, does my last message give you any idea as to the problem? Which part or parts should I be looking at?

  • jjterrell52 Sep 11, 2010

    When you say, " go to this web site", are you saying FixYa? If so, where in FixYa, because I have not been able to locate service manuals for anything. Do you have a suggestion as to what parts I should be looking for in addition to the ones suggested in your earlier ppost? I can read a meter, and can usually follow instructions, but an idiot at determining what to replace. Thanks for your help.

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  • Sony Master
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Look for defective Capacitors on power supply board they will be vented,swollen or puffed up on top 2200uf 10v 3300uf 10v 1000uf 16v,Problem could also be in the Main board which has cable connector and AV jacks on it.

Posted on Sep 10, 2010

  • ladywinn
    ladywinn Sep 11, 2010

    Go to this website they have Free Service Manual that you can Print out online and List of Parts/Prices Encompass Parts Distribution

  • ladywinn
    ladywinn Sep 11, 2010

    You need to CK the plasma Panel, Plus the power source they can cause this problem and Do you know How to Enter the Service Menu?



    With TV OFF ,ON your Hand unit, Press display then 5 then Vol+ then Power button

    Mute+enter Writes and 0 + enter to read





    If these voltages are ok then problem leads back to the Plasma Panel



    For CN1 and CN22 at TV power on

    CN22, pin 1= 55vdc

    pin3 = 5vdc

    pin 8-10= 78vdc for 32 and 82vdc for 42 inch screen

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  • Sony Master
  • 11,800 Answers

I'm assuming that you have tried turning all the image settings to the max and it didn't helped too much. This is an old tv, in that case the plasma panel has aged and this cannot be fixed. Time for a new tv.

Posted on Sep 09, 2010

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MY TV PICTURE HAS GONE A LITTLE DARKER AND ADJUSTING BRIGHT, CONTRAST, COLOR,ETC. DOES NOT HELP


How long u have this RCA analoge tv?Around 10 years or more and used it like about 5 or 6 hrs everydays?Yes,than ur tv it is losing CRT tube radiation cohetion.As times go bye years in years out the tv CRT-(tv tube) radiation will slowly dying out,Tv actual pictures will lost some of it luster and it brightnesses to the tv auctual pictures.Brightnesses of CRT tube will get darker and darker until the tv actual pictures barely it is watchable anymore.Contrast,Brightness and Colors adjusting more will help some.But u have to take this tv aparts and take a Flat scerw driver turn up a little bit more of the tv HV-(high voltage) SCREEN button on the FBT-(flyback transformer) to make any big differences of the CRT tube brightnesses.The FBT-(flyback tranformer) is the big block of plastic with a red wire with a black cap hook up to the tv CRT-(tv tube).This adjustment on of the FBT,HV-SCREEN button will help the tv CRT-(tv tube) last another year or two.

Aug 16, 2011 | RCA TruFlat 27F520T 27" TV

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The picture seems to be getting darker. Its not as bright and sharp as it used to be. Its about 9 years old but has not been used very much. Might it need a new bulb or something? 57HX81 Proj TV Color...


simple: remove back cover and locate the three large black lens you will see top and dead center, clean them with either a lens cloth or a paper towel with glass cleaner----they are the light source for your picture and should be cleaned once a year---as they get dusty the picture gets darker and duller looking.\\

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1 Answer

No picture


it will be the fluros which are hard to find if u can find them not many companies make them and also they are a pain to replace the whole tv has to be pulled apart

May 07, 2010 | Sharp Aquos LC-32G4U 32 in. HD-Ready LCD...

1 Answer

Screen dim, black has green in it, contrast and brightness = shin


Since you have replaced the Color Wheel, it sounds like you have not adjusted the Index Delay in the service menu. First reset all of the picture settings you have adjusted back to original factory settings. Then on your Samsung TV Remote and with the TV OFF, Press Mute,Power,123. This will turn on the set and put you in the Service menu. Look for the top setting and select or scroll to the OPTION setting and select and look for INDEX DELAY and select that. Once you have the Index Delay selected use the right and left buttons on the remote to adjust for a picture the has no abnormal coloring and while looking at a program adjust for when the blacks look black with no abnormal coloring. Once that is done, turn off the set then turn the set back on. Now the picture should look normal.

Apr 03, 2010 | Samsung Televison & Video

2 Answers

In the past few day i've noticed the picture is


BRIGHTNESS. Your owner's manual probably says that the brightness setting is used to control "brightness" or "picture intensity" or something other fuzzy non-descript term. The truth is that brightness is used to set the BLACK level in the picture.
On most TVs and projectors in use today, brightness is set too high. That's because people think "a bright picture is good, so I will set it as bright as I can get." Well, that's nice in theory, but entirely wrong in practice. Setting the brightness level too high makes a black tuxedo look gray rather than black. It muddies up the shadow areas, and reduces the overall snap and crispness that the picture would have if properly calibrated.
To find the right setting for brightness, go to the image in your movie that has textured blacks and hopefully some shadow/low light areas in which there is detail. Then freeze on that frame. As you move the brightness control down, the intensity of the blacks will increase, and shadows will get darker. As you move the control all the way to zero, you will (hopefully) see that the low light shadow areas will also go to solid black and lose their detail.
The optimum setting for brightness is achieved at just the point where true black objects appear as black as your system will make them while retaining as much visible detail in the shadow areas. Above this point the blacks appear to go grayer. Below this point you lose detail in the shadows. On many video systems, this optimum point is toward the lower end of the brightness scale. But find the point that looks correct to you regardless of where it is on the scale.
CONTRAST. The contrast control is similarly confusing. It is also often set too high on the theory that contrast is good, and therefore we might as well get the most we can out of our set by turning it all the way up. In fact, the contrast setting is used to control the intensity of the brightest highlights in the picture, so it is (oddly enough) the opposite of brightness control.
First, find your test scene in which you find textured whites in bright light, and freeze that frame. You are looking for the brightest elements in the picture in which you want to retain visible detail.
Let's assume you have a whitewashed fence in sunlight. If you start with the contrast set low, the fence will appear light gray rather than white. As you move the contrast control up, the fence will get whiter. Eventually details in the texture of the fence will begin to disappear.
If you continue to push contrast past the optimum point, the wood-grain texture of the fence will go solid white and all visible detail will be obliterated. Push contrast up even a little further, and our fenceposts might actually appear to expand very slightly due to a glow around the edges. This phenomenon, called "blooming" is a definite sign that your contrast setting is overcooking the image (and maybe your picture tube as well—don't ever leave the contrast control set this high!!!)
Find the point at which whites look white while retaining as much texture detail as possible. This is your optimum contrast setting. On most video systems, this setting is toward the higher end of the scale, but it can be anywhere. Find the point that looks correct to you. (By the way, unlike TV's, digital projectors will not bloom)
Now…note the following: brightness and contrast can be to some degree interactive. Your new contrast setting may have affected your brightness. So return to the brightness scene and verify that your blacks are still black, and you still have maximum detail in the shadows. Adjust it if necessary, then return and adjust the contrast setting once again if necessary. (You can see that this is much easier if the black and white elements you are testing all appear in the same image!)
COLOR. The color control on your set determines the level of color intensity in the image. One of the most common errors people make in calibrating their video systems is overdriving the color. That's what makes Larry King look reddish-orange on the TV at the gym. Overdriving color is common because once again, people naturally think, "I want to get as much color as I can out of this color TV, so I will crank it up some to make sure I get the most out of it!" No. Bad mistake.
If you move the color setting down to zero you will notice that your picture will turn into a black and white image. The optimum setting for color is achieved by increasing the setting just to the point where colors look natural and not a bit more! Flesh tones should look natural and without any hint of an unnatural glow. Grass should look naturally green rather than screaming spray-paint green.
When adjusting color, make sure that your test image has relatively unsaturated colors. Flesh tones or natural landscapes are ideal. It is impossible to set color properly if you are using a brilliant red Ferrari as your test subject.
On the large majority of video systems, the optimum setting for color is somewhere near the middle of the scale. However, trust your eyes for the optimum setting and think "what looks like the most natural, accurate reproduction of reality?" Any overdriving of color will make the image look artificial.
TINT or HUE. The tint control adjusts color balance rather than color intensity. It is an easy control to set properly, but for some reason many people don't get it right. When flesh tones look either too green or too magenta, a phenomenon you see with amazing frequency, it is because the tint control is not set properly.
Find a human face and freeze-frame it. (In choosing your test subject, note that lighter skin tones will show errors in tint more readily than darker skin tones). As you move the tint control to one end of the spectrum, the face turns green; as you move it to the other extreme, the face turns magenta (red+blue).
The correct setting for tint is the point near the middle of the scale at which you can detect no hint of either green or magenta. It is the most neutral point between the two extremes. The flesh tone looks the most natural at this point.
SHARPNESS or DETAIL. The final setting is sharpness or detail. Now, pray tell, who in their right mind wouldn't want the sharpest, most detailed picture they could get? And since there is a control that lets you turn it up, why not turn it up? That's what many folks do, and of course it's exactly the wrong thing to do.
The sharpness control adds processed information to the picture that is NOT part of the original video signal. It adds artificially highlighted edges, and makes the picture look less natural than it otherwise would. This is most evident along the continuous edge of a dark object against a middle-toned background. When sharpness is overdriven the dark edge will be outlined by a white ringing effect that increases contrast just along the edge of your dark object. That edge "highlighting" effect is created by the sharpness control. It is an artificial manipulation of the image. It wasn't in the original scene, and it shouldn't be on your screen either.
On most televisions, the optimum setting for sharpness is zero. On many digital projectors, the optimum setting is either in the low or middle part of the scale. Picture tube televisions and digital projectors behave differently in this regard; on a digital projector it is often possible to fuzz the image by setting sharpness too low.
Now look at your picture with the sharpness turned down or off depending on what works best on your system. You will see a smoother, more natural image. It might take some getting used to, since you may be accustomed to viewing video with all the artificial edge enhancements that create the illusion of added sharpness.
However, when the interference and noise from the artificial sharpness enhancer is removed, you are seeing the most genuine reproduction of the video signal that your projector or TV is capable of. And if you view it for a while, you will gain an appreciation for just how smooth, natural, and satisfying the picture can really look.

Dec 12, 2009 | Sony Grand WEGA KDF-55XS955 55" Rear...

2 Answers

Dark shadow-like vertical streaks thru LCD screen (Sharp)


Hi, I have a Sony Grand Wega LCD Projection TV that has a blotted gray streak across the front of the screen. I only use a damp cloth to clean the window and that doesn't seem to help. It really shows up on light pictures and is unnoticed when the picture is a little darker. What can I do to fix this problem???

Aug 19, 2009 | Philips 32PF5531D 32 in. LCD Television

1 Answer

TV Screen Dims during dark Scenes


Most likely you have the opc feture on. go to the menu under picture setting first option should be to turn on or off the opc. turn it of and should solve the problem.

Mar 18, 2009 | Sharp Televison & Video

1 Answer

Picture gradually going dark


turn the screen up a little on the flyback..

Dec 16, 2008 | Toshiba 50A61 50" Rear Projection...

1 Answer

Ideal settings for Samsung LN-T 4234H


sure, lcd tvs need to be tweeked depending on the light in the room the darker the worse the picture. so try this
from standard:
picture: 85 to 95 %
brightness: 45% or adjust the black of the video to the black of the pilar bars to equilize them.
color: 32 to 38% or until the flesh tones are not so hot
sharpness: low 10%
tint: always to center
color temp: cool1
back lamp ( if avalible) low when lights are dim, high when lights are bright.
the problem with LCD is they don't look so good with dark sceens. the contast ratio is very low. natively 3000:1 aas compaired to plasma or other direct view TVs. the LCD is back lite and the thin materal of the LCD can not completely block the back light from coming thru. there for the complete "black screen" is illuminated "blue". the best thing is to keep the lights on bright in the room for the best picture.

Feb 22, 2008 | Samsung LNT3242H Television

1 Answer

Black screen...no color


On the back of the set, look for 2 controls labeled focus and screen. If the TV is working but you cannot see the picture, try turning the screen control up little by little and the brightness should come back. If this works then make sure the focus control is set so that the picture is nice and sharp.

Jun 16, 2007 | RCA F19207BC TV

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