Question about Nikon D40 Digital Camera with G-II 18-55mm Lens

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When shooting pictures they are grainy And at times the shutter seems to be sticking

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First make sure your lens are clean on both ends. Also make sure your mirror is also clean, Althought it flips up when you press the shutter, it's a good habit to keep. Now the sticking shutter could be a peoblem with your shutter mechanism. I have a few Nikons and my D70's shutter mechanism went bad and had to be replaced. It started sticking here and there. Then it started fluttering several times at once. Then it just got stuck. Repair for that is around $180 - $200. Not fun!!! :(

Posted on Sep 09, 2010

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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I bought this lense and need instant help. I am shooting pics at a high school football game and it gets dark early. What settings do I switch my camera to in order to get sufficient light and capture all...


Shooting sports and the evening can be a compromise between needed s fast shutter to stop action or a longer shutter to allow enough light for a good exposure. Fortunately, you've got a "fast" lens. My suggestions are:

Shoot in "A" mode (aperture priority) and change the aperture of the lens to the lowest number available to make the aperture open to maximum, and increase the ISO to 400 or 800. You may even get satisfactory results at ISO1600, but you should check the results on a computer screen before blindly going out shooting at the level.

By increasing the aperture, two things happen; exposure times are reduced to minimum so that motion is stopped (or blur minimized) and the the depth of field becomes very narrow or "shallow". Depth of field or "DOF" describes the distance in front and beyond the point of focus that will also be in focus. Large apertures (low "f" number s like 1.4 to 2.8 ) = narrow DOF and small apertures (high "f" numbers like 16 to 22 and beyond) = wide DOF. An example would be if you took a picture of someone's face from a2 feet away at f 1.4 and focused on the tip of the nose - the eyes would begin to get soft or out of focus - the ears would be even more noticeable - and that background would very blurred. The same picture at f 22 nearly everything would be in focus - except for maybe the background - depending how far behind it is from the subject's head. Check the example below:

steve_con_4.jpeg
Look at the backgrounds of the pictures above. The left is largely in focus at f 8 while the right is blurry at f 2.5. Had left been shot at f 22 or more, more of the background would be in focus.


Increasing the ISO to 400 or 800 increases the camera's sensitivity to light like film. The higher the ISO, the less time it takes to get a properly exposed picture. High ISO are helpful in low light situations or other times you need to have a faster shutter speed (for sports or don't have a tripod for pictures that need long exposures). Assume you want to take a picture of something that the camera tells you won't be exposed correctly unless you shoot at say for example f 2.8 and shutter is 1/30 second. If the camera ISO was set to 100, you could change it to 200. This doubles the sensitivity to light - meaning you need 1/2 the light; you can change the f number from f 2.8 to f 4, OR, leave it at 2.8 and increase the shutter speed to the next faster value 1/60 sec. If you change the ISO to 400, it is now 4x's sensitive than 100 (or 2x's than 200). At ISO 400, you could go two f stops smaller to f 5.6 or stay at 2.8 and increase shutter from 1/30 to 1/125. For ISO 800, you could go three f stops smaller to f 8 or stay at 2.8 and increase shutter from 1/30 to 1/250. You can mix and match, too. Go one up on the speed and two smaller on the aperture. The drawback to higher ISOs is that the pictures become grainier with each increase. Eventually, the pictures don't look good when you get into ISO numbers above 800 (or less on some DSLR cameras - and even less on point and shoot types). You have to experiment to find where your preferences are. See below for Low and High ISO comparison shots:

steve_con_86.jpg
The left picture above has nice, smooth transitions between shades of colors - the right picture has a grainy appearance called "noise". Some is acceptable but others are not - it depends what YOU can live with. Sometimes it's better to have a grainy shot than nothing at all.

Lastly, you can shoot "S" for shutter mode, to control motion instead of "A" which controls volume of light instead. The same principles apply.

I hope this helps & good luck!

Sep 08, 2011 | Tamron SP AF 70200mm f28 Di LD IF Makro...

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What settings would I use taking low light action pictures


In general, taking action pictures is all about getting as much light in the camera as possible. In lieu of light, you can increase the camera's sensitivity to the light. This is called your ISO sensitivity and the higher the ISO, the more sensitive to light your camera is, and therefore they allow you to shoot with a faster shutter speed. The faster your shutter speed, the clearer your action pictures will be. In general, try a shutter speed of at least 1/250. Be warned: The higher your ISO, the more grainy your pictures may be, and if you have a consumer-end camera (point-and-shoot, or 4/3rds SLR) any higher than ISO 800 will most likely destroy the quality of your photos. If possible at all, try adding more light.

Hope this helped.

Chuck

May 06, 2011 | Cameras

1 Answer

Shots coming out black or nearly black. I'm shooting in RAW. When I try and rescue them on photoshop they come out really grainy


Sounds like the shots are under exposed with the shutter speed to fast.
Are you shooting in low light and no flash ?

If so, reduce your shutter speed to something like 1/60 with an aperture of around F5.6 - F7.1 (these can be lowered if you raise your iso)

Obviously this will depend on the lens type and brand.

Your statement sounds like you are shooting in raw at a very fast shutter speed with a low iso (200).

The grainy effect is normally due to a lot of noise (high iso) which makes this sound strange to say the least.

Check your camera settings (menu) and turn on noise reducution, this will help in removing some of the noise.

Oct 31, 2009 | Nikon D40x Digital Camera

1 Answer

I have a dc-wpc-st531tblk-vp and the pics use to be amazing but now they are very grainy. Is there a reason and can it be fixed?


The most likely cause of this is an inadvertent change in the settings. Check to ensure that your camera is set at the highest quality setting (Megapixels). Also, look at the program modes. For regular point-and-shoot pictures, just set it on 'auto'. If it has been set on a night-shot or set to manual, the aperature and shutter speed will make the image look grainy.
Hope this helps. Good Luck!

Oct 06, 2009 | Cameras

2 Answers

The night setting results in blurry pictures


The grain is from underxexposure and the blur is from hand shake caused by low shutter speed. Try using a tripod. Also, change from auto settings and shoot in manual mode with a high ISO and low aperture setting. Good luck!

Jul 15, 2009 | Nikon COOLPIX S200 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Focusing issues with canon 40D when taking sports shots


I believe I have found my problem. I think my image stablizer on my lens is on the brink! I turn it off and got good pictures.

Jun 03, 2009 | Canon EOS 40D Digital Camera

1 Answer

Grainy pictures


You have likely set the camera to shoot photos in low resolution, or high ISO or both. Check your camera manual for detailed instructions on how to set these options.

If you don't have your computer manual, you can download one from this page at Canon.com. This is for the Powershot S500, this is the same camera as your IXUS 500, they just gave it a different name in different countries.

Always set the camera to shoot in the highest quality resolution mode. Memory cards are relatively cheap and you don't want to end up getting that photo of the lifetime but because you shot it in a low resolution mode you can't get a good print!

If you are shooting in low light the camera may be automatically boosting the ISO. There are only 3 ways to shoot in low light:

1) Flash - only works when your subject is relatively close to the camera.
2) Increase the ISO which results in noise in the dark areas of the image.
3) Use a tripod and a long shutter (slow shutter speed).

Dec 19, 2008 | Canon PowerShot S500 IXUS 500 Digital...

1 Answer

Wet olympus E-500


PLease take the camera to a service station before the whole things shutsdown due to liquid damage .... normally it does not show immediately but in the long run it will give probs...

Oct 12, 2008 | Olympus EVOLT E-500 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Pictures are "grainy"


This may work, remove the batteries to try to "reset" the camera.

Jul 03, 2008 | Fuji FinePix S5700 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Grainy pictures


grainy pictures are possibly casued by a very high ISO (sensativity) setting, you should be on 100 or lower for best normal shots. Higher settings are for low light and custom shooting in strange lighting or aperature/shutter speeds. Try full auto setting.

Mar 03, 2008 | Canon PowerShot S3 IS Digital Camera

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