Question about Burris Red Dot Sights AR332 3x32mm Tube Tactical Prism Red Dot Sight 3002

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My reticle is slanted - Burris Red Dot Sights AR332 3x32mm Tube Tactical Prism Red Dot Sight 3002

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1 Answer

Loose reticle,


Unscrew the scope tube from the center section. Not recommended.

Nov 25, 2013 | Bsa Optics Black Powder 3-9x40 Riflescope...

1 Answer

Is the Zeiss conquest Z-plex scopes first or second focal plane?


Zeiss Conquest scopes are all second focal plane scopes. This indicates that the reticle, Z-plex in this case, is located on the second image plane.
  • Reticles on the second focal plane remain the same size regardless of the magnification setting of the scope.
  • When on the first focal plane, reticles will increase or decrease in size as the magnification is changed.

Nov 16, 2010 | Zeiss Conquest w/Z-Plex Reticle/Side Focus...

1 Answer

How do I adjust the reticle for a Simmons Mag 4X32 scope. The reticle is not straight up and down and level parallel.


the reticle should be level if its not you need to turn the scope body round in its mounts till it is level and then nip the scope caps up

Sep 06, 2010 | Simmons 511070 4x32 22 MAG Riflescope -...

1 Answer

How to use the BDC on my rifle scope



  1. Step 1 Take a rifle with a properly installed BDC bullet drop compensating reticle to a rifle range. Using ear protection zero the scope reticle so that the point of impact corresponds to the center of the cross hairs at the distance you have selected - typically 100 or 200 yds.
  2. Step 2 Determine the trajectory of the specific cartridge you have selected. There are several ways to do this. Ammo manufacturers publish trajectory and wind drift information. There are web based ballistic calculators like http://www.biggameinfo.com/BalCalc.aspx which will tell you how much your bullet drops at known distances.
  3. Step 3 Scope manufacturers like Leupold can be a valuable source of information about their reticle: "Leupold® Ballistic Aiming System: Boone and Crockett Club® Big Game Reticle aiming system provides a series of additional aiming points to improve your ability to shoot accurately at longer ranges. Nikon2_bing.gif also provides good information suggesting the marks on their reticle be used for zero at 100yds followed by circles below representing 200, 300, 400 and 500 yds if the cartridge travels around 2800 ft per sec. Nikon suggests the center cross hair be zeroed at 200 yds for magnum calibers traveling around 3000 ft per sec. We understant that each variation of different bullet weight and powder charge changes trajectory and a scope manufacturer can not build a different reticle for each different cartridge made so practice on the range to determine how well the marks relate to the actual impact of where your bullet strikes at a know distance is important. The one thing that people using BDC scopes typically have problems with is that a BDC scope has the reticle in the second focal plane of the scope. If the reticle was in the first focal plane of the scope the reticle would look smaller on low powers like 3x and grow proportionately larger as the power increased to say 9x top power. The problem is that while the marks on the BDC reticle correspond accurately to the bullet drop at the know distances 200, 300yds etc. What happens when you lower the power from the scopes maximum power to any other lower power is the reticle stays the same size and the field of view within the scope increases which means that the distance between these marks on the BDC reticle no longer corresponds to the point where the bullet will strike. In short BDC reticles only work at the maximum power of the scope or at a set specific power. At all other powers these BDC reticles do not accurately represent where the bullet will strike.
  4. Step 4 The center X always remains the same. If you zero at 100 yards and you know that your bullet drops 8 inches at 300 yards you could forget about the BDC marks and hold the center X 8 inches high - that works at any power 3x or 9x and should be used at lower powers. If you zero the center crosshair at 100yds and have the BDC scope at the maximum power 9X then the first line or circle below the center X should be the mark you place on the center of the 200 yard target----- the bullet strike should hit the center. If by some chance you put the scope on 3x and placed that first mark below the center cross hair on that 200 yard target you would shoot over the top of the target. This is because as the power of the scope decreases the field of view increases the angle increase and gets wider. You can experiment with known power settings and see at a specific power say 3x what that first circle down corresponds to and make notes because at any set power what the marks correspond to will be repeatable.
I got this from a website, hope it helps.

Apr 08, 2010 | Hammers Air Gun Rifle Scope 3-7x20 With...

1 Answer

Can you explain to me what you mean by "Engraved Reticle"


Hi,

This means they are are designed with a glass engraved reticle system in which the reticle is laser-etched onto precision glass rather than using a thin wire. This eliminates the chances of breaking or becoming misaligned, as is the case with other scopes.

Let me know, if needed further assistance.

Hope i helped you.

Thanks for using ' Fixya ' and have a nice day!!

Mar 11, 2010 | Konus Optics

1 Answer

I HAVE A RIFLESCOPE THAT THE RETICLE MOVED IN AND WAS NO LONGER STRAIGHT UP AND HORIZONTAL-NOW IT SEEMS TO BE CLOSE TO WHER IT SHOULD BE AGAIN-TRYING TO FIGURE OUT WHAT IS HAPPENING


Although I suppose it isn't impossible for the reticle to loosen, has the body of the scope perhaps just turned? Maybe the mounts need to be a little tighter.

Feb 02, 2010 | Bushnell ® Elite® 3200 3 - 9x40 mm...

1 Answer

How do I use the range finding graph reticle from barska?


The IR Rangefinding Reticle is based on the military reticle that ranges tanks, believe it or not, front to back--whatever line the tank fits between will give the range to it...but the reticle has been adapted for use in some riflescopes. Trying to define the math behind rangefinding and downrange zeroing with multi-stadia reticles is complicated and takes some study to fully grasp the concepts, which is why I have a constantly available on-line article, entitled, "Tactical Ballistic and Ranging Reticle Analysis," right here--
http://specialtypistols.infopop.cc/Reticle_Ranging___App.pdf

Jan 27, 2010 | Barska Optics Barska® 8 - 32x50 mm IR...

1 Answer

Ranging reticle in Fujinon FMTRC-SX Binocular


Its easier to explain seeing a diagram. Go to Tascos website and download the instruction manual for the Offshore binoculars or Steiner Optic website and download the general binoculars instruction manual. It has all of Steiners models incuding those with a reticle. Most reticles are the same and there is no difference between meters and yards as your calculations are an approximate.

If your Fujinon is an ex military unit it has what is known as an M22 reticle. It is only slighlty different as it is graduated in mils but the calculations is the same. If it is the M22, google Binocular M22 manual. The military number for this is TM 9-1240-403-12 & P

Mar 22, 2009 | Fujinon Polaris FMTRC-SX (7x50) Binocular

1 Answer

Problem with bushnell holosight


Get a lens pen and try cleaning the screens. That should help.

Dec 15, 2008 | Bushnell ® HOLOsight

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