Question about Toshiba TP61H95 61" Rear Projection Television

1 Answer

Screen blanks out, no picture and the red light next to the power light blinks every second or so. If you unplug the tv and plug it back in, the picture returns. Is this a bad power supply.

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  • Toshiba Master
  • 5,568 Answers

> Is this a bad power supply. Highly possible; one of the failure modes for 'switched mode' power supplies is a reluctance to start up. This is often caused by the decay of a 20 cent capacitor that should have cost 50 cents. Cutting off AC to the supply can allow the cheap capacitor to recover some of its lost value and do what it should. Asian designers seem to think that doubling the value of an electrolytic will ensure its survival when they should instead buy only parts rated for the type of service some of them see; the cost difference would be small.

Posted on Sep 07, 2010

  • 7 more comments 
  • bgetchell Sep 07, 2010

    so how can I confirm the failure mode. The TV generally starts up and then intrmittently loses the picture. Sound is always present. un-plug the TV for a moment, plug it back in and the problem is solved. This has been happening for approximately 4 months.

  • bgetchell Sep 07, 2010

    thank you... by the way

  • Steve Allison
    Steve Allison Sep 08, 2010

    It's helpful when folks mention not only the problem they have but the problem they don't have. Since you have sound, the main power supply is probably not a fault.
    The projection CRTs use high voltage in their operation, so the problem is likely related to an intermittent failure in the separate supply that provides the high voltage.

    I suggest you pull the unit away from the wall and then pull the AC plug and let the set rest overnight to allow residual voltages to discharge.
    Remove the lower panel to gain access to where the electronics are customarily found.

    The first thing you might want to try is to remove and re-plug and beefier connectors you see, particularly those that interconnect separate assemblies, paying special attention to smaller boards that are populated with larger components; these will be power supplies and I think you will find two of these.
    One of them will have several in- and outputs, the other, the high voltage supply fewer. This latter one is the one I suspect.

    If you can visually inspect both with a good light source, look around the bases and the exposed aluminum tops of the different-sized cylindrical parts with shrink-wrapped jackets and values such as (example-they vary) 47uF/50VDC. These are capacitors and common culprits in failures such as yours.
    These parts are called 'electrolytic' capacitors and are devices using chemicals that sometimes leak (not supposed to though) if they are failing and will discharge some onto the board on which they are mounted and if the failure is severe, will cause the scored top to split open to relieve internal gas pressure.

    If you see no signs of things described, then you need a trip to Radio Shack or other electronic supply place to secure a couple of cans of 'freeze spray.' This stuff produces -40 F and lower temperatures used for troubleshooting.
    Cooling a weak capacitor can restore it temporarily and confirm the condition of a suspect part.
    A hair dryer can be used to (gently) reheat a suspect part and cause it to fail again and with a couple of cycles, establish that a part is bad.

    Now, keeping in mind that a 'live' circuit can be dangerous, you will need to provide AC to start your search.
    Assuming the video is missing, spray those cylindrical parts, which can vary in physical size from 1/2"H X 1/4"D to as much as 2"H 1"D, the small one with a very short burst, the larger with no mare than ~ 2 seconds.
    Do NOT jump from one to the next; they all have some thermal mass and need time (2 seconds for small, 5-10 seconds for large) to 'soak' and allow the internal warmth to dissipate.

    If you are patient (and lucky) you should be able to find the marginal part.

    If you make it this far and decide you can DIY, comment back and we'll continue.

  • Steve Allison
    Steve Allison Sep 08, 2010

    It's helpful when folks mention not only the problem they have but the problem they don't have. Since you have sound, the main power supply is probably not a fault.
    The projection CRTs use high voltage in their operation, so the problem is likely related to an intermittent failure in the separate supply that provides the high voltage.

    I suggest you pull the unit away from the wall and then pull the AC plug and let the set rest overnight to allow residual voltages to discharge.
    Remove the lower panel to gain access to where the electronics are customarily found.

    The first thing you might want to try is to remove and re-plug and beefier connectors you see, particularly those that interconnect separate assemblies, paying special attention to smaller boards that are populated with larger components; these will be power supplies and I think you will find two of these.
    One of them will have several in- and outputs, the other, the high voltage supply fewer. This latter one is the one I suspect.

    If you can visually inspect both with a good light source, look around the bases and the exposed aluminum tops of the different-sized cylindrical parts with shrink-wrapped jackets and values such as (example-they vary) 47uF/50VDC. These are capacitors and common culprits in failures such as yours.
    These parts are called 'electrolytic' capacitors and are devices using chemicals that sometimes leak (not supposed to though) if they are failing and will discharge some onto the board on which they are mounted and if the failure is severe, will cause the scored top to split open to relieve internal gas pressure.

    If you see no signs of things described, then you need a trip to Radio Shack or other electronic supply place to secure a couple of cans of 'freeze spray.' This stuff produces -40 F and lower temperatures used for troubleshooting.
    Cooling a weak capacitor can restore it temporarily and confirm the condition of a suspect part.
    A hair dryer can be used to (gently) reheat a suspect part and cause it to fail again and with a couple of cycles, establish that a part is bad.

    Now, keeping in mind that a 'live' circuit can be dangerous, you will need to provide AC to start your search.
    Assuming the video is missing, spray those cylindrical parts, which can vary in physical size from 1/2"H X 1/4"D to as much as 2"H 1"D, the small one with a very short burst, the larger with no mare than ~ 2 seconds.
    Do NOT jump from one to the next; they all have some thermal mass and need time (2 seconds for small, 5-10 seconds for large) to 'soak' and allow the internal warmth to dissipate.

    If you are patient (and lucky) you should be able to find the marginal part.

    If you make it this far and decide you can DIY, comment back and we'll continue.

  • Steve Allison
    Steve Allison Sep 08, 2010

    It's helpful when folks mention not only the problem they have but the problem they don't have. Since you have sound, the main power supply is probably not a fault.
    The projection CRTs use high voltage in their operation, so the problem is likely related to an intermittent failure in the separate supply that provides the high voltage.

    I suggest you pull the unit away from the wall and then pull the AC plug and let the set rest overnight to allow residual voltages to discharge.
    Remove the lower panel to gain access to where the electronics are customarily found.

    The first thing you might want to try is to remove and re-plug and beefier connectors you see, particularly those that interconnect separate assemblies, paying special attention to smaller boards that are populated with larger components; these will be power supplies and I think you will find two of these.
    One of them will have several in- and outputs, the other, the high voltage supply fewer. This latter one is the one I suspect.

    If you can visually inspect both with a good light source, look around the bases and the exposed aluminum tops of the different-sized cylindrical parts with shrink-wrapped jackets and values such as (example-they vary) 47uF/50VDC. These are capacitors and common culprits in failures such as yours.
    These parts are called 'electrolytic' capacitors and are devices using chemicals that sometimes leak (not supposed to though) if they are failing and will discharge some onto the board on which they are mounted and if the failure is severe, will cause the scored top to split open to relieve internal gas pressure.

    If you see no signs of things described, then you need a trip to Radio Shack or other electronic supply place to secure a couple of cans of 'freeze spray.' This stuff produces -40 F and lower temperatures used for troubleshooting.
    Cooling a weak capacitor can restore it temporarily and confirm the condition of a suspect part.
    A hair dryer can be used to (gently) reheat a suspect part and cause it to fail again and with a couple of cycles, establish that a part is bad.

    Now, keeping in mind that a 'live' circuit can be dangerous, you will need to provide AC to start your search.
    Assuming the video is missing, spray those cylindrical parts, which can vary in physical size from 1/2"H X 1/4"D to as much as 2"H 1"D, the small one with a very short burst, the larger with no mare than ~ 2 seconds.
    Do NOT jump from one to the next; they all have some thermal mass and need time (2 seconds for small, 5-10 seconds for large) to 'soak' and allow the internal warmth to dissipate.

    If you are patient (and lucky) you should be able to find the marginal part.

    If you make it this far and decide you can DIY, comment back and we'll continue.

  • Steve Allison
    Steve Allison Sep 08, 2010

    It's helpful when folks mention not only the problem they have but the problem they don't have. Since you have sound, the main power supply is probably not a fault.
    The projection CRTs use high voltage in their operation, so the problem is likely related to an intermittent failure in the separate supply that provides the high voltage.

    I suggest you pull the unit away from the wall and then pull the AC plug and let the set rest overnight to allow residual voltages to discharge.
    Remove the lower panel to gain access to where the electronics are customarily found.

    The first thing you might want to try is to remove and re-plug and beefier connectors you see, particularly those that interconnect separate assemblies, paying special attention to smaller boards that are populated with larger components; these will be power supplies and I think you will find two of these.
    One of them will have several in- and outputs, the other, the high voltage supply fewer. This latter one is the one I suspect.

    If you can visually inspect both with a good light source, look around the bases and the exposed aluminum tops of the different-sized cylindrical parts with shrink-wrapped jackets and values such as (example-they vary) 47uF/50VDC. These are capacitors and common culprits in failures such as yours.
    These parts are called 'electrolytic' capacitors and are devices using chemicals that sometimes leak (not supposed to though) if they are failing and will discharge some onto the board on which they are mounted and if the failure is severe, will cause the scored top to split open to relieve internal gas pressure.

    Will continue, replies are limited.

  • Steve Allison
    Steve Allison Sep 08, 2010

    It's helpful when folks mention not only the problem they have but the problem they don't have. Since you have sound, the main power supply is probably not a fault.
    The projection CRTs use high voltage in their operation, so the problem is likely related to an intermittent failure in the separate supply that provides the high voltage.

    I suggest you pull the unit away from the wall and then pull the AC plug and let the set rest overnight to allow residual voltages to discharge.
    Remove the lower panel to gain access to where the electronics are customarily found.

    The first thing you might want to try is to remove and re-plug and beefier connectors you see, particularly those that interconnect separate assemblies, paying special attention to smaller boards that are populated with larger components; these will be power supplies and I think you will find two of these.
    One of them will have several in- and outputs, the other, the high voltage supply fewer. This latter one is the one I suspect.

    If you can visually inspect both with a good light source, look around the bases and the exposed aluminum tops of the different-sized cylindrical parts with shrink-wrapped jackets and values such as (example-they vary) 47uF/50VDC. These are capacitors and common culprits in failures such as yours.
    These parts are called 'electrolytic' capacitors and are devices using chemicals that sometimes leak (not supposed to though) if they are failing and will discharge some onto the board on which they are mounted and if the failure is severe, will cause the scored top to split open to relieve internal gas pressure.

    Will continue, replies are limited.

  • Steve Allison
    Steve Allison Sep 08, 2010

    It's helpful when folks mention not only the problem they have but the problem they don't have. Since you have sound, the main power supply is probably not a fault.
    The projection CRTs use high voltage in their operation, so the problem is likely related to an intermittent failure in the separate supply that provides the high voltage.

    I suggest you pull the unit away from the wall and then pull the AC plug and let the set rest overnight to allow residual voltages to discharge.
    Remove the lower panel to gain access to where the electronics are customarily found.

    The first thing you might want to try is to remove and re-plug and beefier connectors you see, particularly those that interconnect separate assemblies, paying special attention to smaller boards that are populated with larger components; these will be power supplies and I think you will find two of these.
    One of them will have several in- and outputs, the other, the high voltage supply fewer. This latter one is the one I suspect.

    It's helpful when folks mention not only the problem they have, but the problem they don't have. Since you have sound, the main power supply is probably not a fault.
    The projection CRTs use high voltage in their operation, so the problem is likely related to an intermittent failure in the separate supply that provides the high voltage.

    I suggest you pull the unit away from the wall and then pull the AC plug and let the set rest overnight to allow residual voltages to discharge.
    Remove the lower panel to gain access to where the electronics are customarily found.

    The first thing you might want to try is to remove and re-plug and beefier connectors you see, particularly those that interconnect separate assemblies, paying special attention to smaller boards that are populated with larger components; these will be power supplies and I think you will find two of these.
    One of them will have several in- and outputs, the other, the high voltage supply fewer. This latter one is the one I suspect.

    It's helpful when folks mention not only the problem they have, but the problem they don't have. Since you have sound, the main power supply is probably not a fault.
    The projection CRTs use high voltage in their operation, so the problem is likely related to an intermittent failure in the separate supply that provides the high voltage.

    I suggest you pull the unit away from the wall and then pull the AC plug and let the set rest overnight to allow residual voltages to discharge.
    Remove the lower panel to gain access to where the electronics are customarily found.

    The first thing you might want to try is to remove and re-plug and beefier connectors you see, particularly those that interconnect separate assemblies, paying special attention to smaller boards that are populated with larger components; these will be power supplies and I think you will find two of these.
    One of them will have several in- and outputs, the other, the high voltage supply fewer. This latter one is the one I suspect.
    Will continue, replies are limited in length.

  • Steve Allison
    Steve Allison Sep 08, 2010

    Tried to respond with explicit instructions but replies are length-limited.
    Please supply an email address to: freetekATlycos.com (make the usual correction.)

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