Question about Canon PowerShot SD1000 Digital Camera

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I think my flash is broken. I can take outdoor pictures, but it won't allow me to shoot without enough light. any suggestions on how to fix this myself?

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Thank you so much for the timely help

Posted on Sep 08, 2010

  • msvora2003 Sep 08, 2010

    Thank you so much for the timely help

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1 Answer

Flash problem


The only things I can think of that could go wring with this camera are:
Batteries are not fully loaded or not new. When not having enough power the flash can't be charged enough, so it won\t fire.
the second thing could be you dailed in the wrong setting. The setting is for full sun light and yu are taking pictures inside. (not likely.)
The film package you are using is out of date or was stored wrong. (not likely eighther)
The flash (camera) is defect

Nov 11, 2013 | FUJIFILM instax mini 7 Digital Camera

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Fuzzy pictures indoors on point and shoot cameras


I read a lot of complaints from people about their not being able to take clear, dependable pictures indoors, with the flash or without. Most of these complaints are from regular users, with limited technical knowledge or experience. First of all, we need to be realistic about point and shoot cameras. They are a general purpose camera, and they have sure come a long way for the bucks we put out for them. We, in our newfound bliss, use them in all situations, however, and become disappointed when they fail to come out in focus and pretty. There are a number of things that cause a picture to be out of focus indoors, and even outdoors at times, but low lighting and a non-distinct subject are the major villians that ruin our precious moments.
A point and shoot camera has a sensor that demands a certain amount of light to translate the object digitally. In low light situations, the camera simply can't "see" good enough to focus well, and there is a simple solution, which is getting more light in the room. Forarmed with good light ensures quality pictures, but even moreso, having the right lighting is the icing on the cake. There is nothing you can do to force a camera to do that which it not capable of, and although manufacturing specs usually specify low light minimums, these conditions turn out to be less perfect in reality than the specs might lead us to believe. If you really do a lot of shooting indoors, and want the best quality pictures, you have to step up to a digital SLR camera. They have more sensitive sensors, more pixels, and control over manual settings that you just can't achieve with a typical point and shoot, allowing you to take better pictures under difficult situations. So, in summary, be realistic about your point and shoot, and do a little research into proper lighting for good results. You can google the topic and get many great articles by pros and amatuers alike, letting you know what works, and giving you options. Remember the old saying "you get what you pay for", and if you really demand more perfection in your photography, you will have to step up to a more capable digital SLR system, and dig in your wallet a bit! Good luck, and happy camering!

on Apr 01, 2010 | Cameras

1 Answer

What is forced flash


"Forced flash" is when you force the flash to fire even if the camera thinks there's enough light to photograph without it.

As an example, consider taking a photo of a person outdoors with the sun coming from one side and casting half the face in shadow. By forcing the flash to fire, you can illuminate the shadowed portion without affecting the background.

Jul 31, 2013 | GE X5 Digital Camera

2 Answers

I have a Canon Power Shot A720. Outdoor photos are beautiful. Indoor photos are always grainy/blurry...a lot of noise. I have tried the ISP feature but there are only two choices... 1. Auto or 2....


Hi Usually outdoor picture are good within small compact camera. They designed like that. But now your unit just have flash pcb defective. When flash function work, your picture will be good indoor. Regarding your flash unit would be brown fuse or replacement of flash unit. It is 50 and 50 chance. Your local repair shop would charge around $35 to 95 depend on what they really want to charge. Thanks and best regard!

May 24, 2011 | Canon PowerShot A720 IS Digital Camera

1 Answer

My sanyo vpc-s670r digital camera has a blurred shot. how can i fix this problem? i also clean the lens still blurred especially when shotting outdoor.


You must take pictures gently. Blur picture may occur if you move during capturing a picture. Or your hand move too fast after taking a picture. Try to stay still for two or three second after push the capture button.
Blur picture when shooting outdoor can be caused by too much light. Don't forget to set your camera in outdoor or panorama mode, and turn of the flash light if you think its too bright.

Hope this help and RATE please !

Jan 16, 2011 | Sanyo VPC-S670 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Slow shutter speed


Either shoot with more light, like outdoors in the sun, or else force the flash on by pressing cursor-up (marked with a lightning bolt) and selecting the lightning bolt icon.

Jul 01, 2009 | Nikon Coolpix L11 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Flashing negative sign


A few suggestions for outdoor flash too bright with SB-600.
1 - If flash is in the auto mode, try hitting the (-) symbol a few times to lower the flash output
2 - Quick fix for close shooting - pull down the diffuser. You loose about 2 stops of flash light and effect is much softer. Don't forget to raise it later or you might think you have the opposite problem
3 - On the camera side, you play with your ISO. Depending on the scene, changing ISO can increase or decrease effect of flash vs background. This can be tricky to predict in auto because the camera is doing calculations of its own.
4 - You can put the camera in aperture mode and set your apeture so that you get a good balance between flash and ambient light. The camera will adjust the shutter speed, which increases or decreases the effect of the background - while the flash remains a constant. This can be very effective in tricky lighting situations, but be prepared to take lots of test shots to get it right.
5 - You can put the flash in manual mode. That will give you a consistant fixed reduced flash output regardless of what the camera tries to change. You have to keep checking your display to see the effect, but with camera in auto this can be a winner.
6 - Finally, you can go "old school" and put both camera and flash in manual and find your best combination. When I'm pressed for time in tricky conditions I often do this by finding a good setiting for a fixed distance, and then adjusting my apeture up or down as I shoot closer or farther things. We had to do it like this back in the day, and with the histogram on the display, I can get dead on where the camera "brain" would get tricked.

Jun 30, 2009 | Nikon Speedlight SB-600 TTL Flash

1 Answer

Hand signal coming up when trying to take picture


The hand icon means you don't have enough light to take a hand-held photo. You need to either increase the light (take the photo in brighter light, such as outdoors in the sun), use flash, or a tripod.

Some cameras have a mode that will let you shoot anyway, but most people are not happy with the blurry photos they get when shooting when the camera warned them with the hand icon so you are better off not using that over-ride mode.

Dec 31, 2008 | Sony Cyber-shot DSC-W55 Digital Camera

1 Answer

When i dont use the flash on a nikon it is blured


When taking a picture the camera needs a certain amount of light to hit the sensor before it can record a good image. If you are outdoors in the sun and the camera still takes blurred pictures due to a long exposure time then there is a malfunction. In bright lighting situations the camera should decide on its own not to use the flash. For indoor situations the camera has to either supplament the available light with the flash, or increase the duration of exposure to collect more of the existing light. There is no way around it - the sensor needs a certain amount of light to create a quality image. On some cameras you can override the shutter speed setting and force a fast exposure but without proper lighting you will just end up with dark images. You might also be able to override the F setting to the lowest possible value which would let in the most light. However, these cameras are generally very good at deciding how much light they need to take a quality image. If the flash is set to auto and the camera decides to use it then there is simply not enough light to get an exposure with a fast shutter time. This is one of the factors that gets better the more expensive the equipment is. Higher end point and shoot units and SLR units can collect more of the available light with their larger lenses and thus get good exposures in lower light conditions while still maintaining fast shutter speeds. Additionally "image stabilized" cameras help compensate for this situation by electronically assisting the photographer in stabilizing the image - allowing longer exposure times to be shot hand-held. You could also try a tripod if that is appropriate to your needs, that would help you shoot longer exposures in low light without so much image-wide blurring. Of course anything in motion will still blur. David Millier Advance Camera Repair

Feb 18, 2007 | Nikon COOLPIX S6 Digital Camera

1 Answer

The best situation to use each of the shooting modes


The shooting modes are described as follows: AUTO (Factory default setting) Auto mode is used for regular photography. The camera automatically makes the settings for natural color balance. Other functions, such as the flash mode and metering, can be adjusted manually. Portrait Portrait mode is suitable for taking a portrait-style picture of a person. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions. Night scene Night scene mode is suitable for shooting pictures in the evening or at night. The camera sets a slower shutter speed than is used in normal shooting. If you take a picture of a street at night in any other mode, the lack of brightness will result in a dark picture with only dots of light showing. In this mode, the true appearance of the street is captured. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions. If you use the flash, you can take pictures of both your subject and the night background. SCENE Scene mode enables you to select one of the following scene shooting modes available in the menu. Landscape + Scene shooting Landscape + Scene shooting is suitable for taking pictures of landscapes and other outdoor scenes. This mode produces clear, sharp pictures with excellent detail, making it ideal for shooting natural scenery. Landscape + Portrait shooting Landscape + Portrait shooting is suitable for taking photos of both your subject and the background. The picture is taken with the background as well as the subject in the foreground in focus. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting settings QuickTime Movie Quicktime Movie mode lets you record movies. The focus and zoom are locked. If the distance to the subject changes, the focus may be compromised. Landscape Landscape mode is suitable for taking pictures of landscapes and other outdoor scenes. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions. Self-portrait Self-portrait mode enables you to take a picture of yourself while holding the camera. Point the lens towards yourself, and the focus will be locked on you. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions. The zoom is fixed in the wide position and cannot be changed. My Mode Enables you to make settings manually and register them in the mode dial's mode so you can call up your own shooting mode whenever you want. Program shooting (P) Program shooting allows you to shoot using an aperture and shutter speed that the camera sets. You can set the flash, white balance, or other functions manually. Aperture priority shooting (A) Aperture priority shooting allows you to set the aperture manually. The camera sets the shutter speed automatically. By decreasing the aperture value (F-number), the camera will focus within a smaller range, producing a picture with a blurred background. Increasing the value will let the camera focus over a wider range in the forward and backward directions, resulting in a picture in which

Sep 04, 2005 | Olympus Camedia C-60 Zoom Digital Camera

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