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I am shooting with a 10mm - 22mm lens - however that should not matter. Frequently my camera cannot find a focal point and therefore i cannot active the shutter release. I am forced to switch to either Manual focus or A (Automatic. I generally have the camera set to either AV or P for standard shooting. I have an EOS Reblel (6.4 pxls) that i've used with the same (10 -22) lens and i have never run into this focusing issue. Also, I am framing pretty standard subjects like doorways etc....NOT a bird on the horizon! I am very frustrated as this was supposed to be a super camera and it's causing me real stress - when I have a framed image to change my settings at the point of exposure is extraordinarily disruptive. Any help is welcome. janet@roro.org

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Hi Janet.

If the problem is with auto focus, then it is a factory defect due to the smaller flap. Here an article I wrote regarding this problem: the auto focus feature.

If problem is instead with manual focus, then issue may concern settings, firmware, lens, lens contacts, micro USM motors.

The auto focus issue is a common problem affecting different Canon Rebel models.Read the article above and follow instructions. The problem can only be fixed replacing the sub flapper pin.

Posted on Sep 07, 2010

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The best telephoto lens for this camera?


Canon G10 - Ken Rockwell

www.kenrockwell.com/canon/g10.htm
Oct 20, 2008 - The Canon G10 is the best compact digital camera I've ever used, ...The G10 is a regular Canon Powershot point-and-shoot, in a tough ..... On the G10 theISO dial moves under the mode dial to make room for ... Neither the G10 or G9 have true zoom lenses; they only change focal length in discreet steps.

Canon PowerShot G10 Review ' Digital Camera Resource ...

www.dcresource.com/reviews/canon/powershot_g10-review/
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Hi. Is it possible to shoot photos using the digital zoom in manual mode?? canon 600d


No, EOS systems only use lens at a fix focal point like 50mm, or lens that have zooms built in, ie; 24mm to 105mm. You can zoom images in a image editor like Photoshop.

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I have a tamron 28-200mm lens that have a aperture ring at the back .. so is it possible to lock the aperture at f3.8 and shoot at 200mm focal ?? (this lens was f3.8- f5.6) by the way i was using a n


If you're using a Nikon camera, you want to lock the aperture ring at its smallest setting (largest f/number). You can control the aperture from the camera body, the same way as on a lens without an aperture ring.

This has nothing to do with the focal length. You can shoot at any focal length from 28mm to 200mm.

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If you had a compact camera it would say 10x zoom what is the equivilent in a 70mm -300mm tamron


A 35-80 mm lens is 2.3X zoom. Divide 80 by 35 and you'll get the result.

It is usually better to know what the focal length of a lens in "35 mm equivalent" is and judge by that, rather than relying on the "X" power of the lens. For instance, most point and shoot cameras start at about 35 mm and have either a 3X or 4X zoom. This would make it a 35-105 or a 35-140. I've seen some that start at 28 mm, though. A 3X starting at 28 mm is 28-84 and a 4X is 28-112. Neither one is a particularly strong telephoto lens and the 4X is just about the same as the 3X that starts out at 35 mm.

It's also important to realize that tradition dictates that lens focal lengths are usually expressed in terms of "35 mm equivalent," where "35 mm" refers to a 35 mm film camera. This is because of the relation between the sensor size and the actual focal length of the lens and the resultant angle of view of the lens.

I have one point & shoot that is actually a 5.8-24 mm zoom. This is a 4X zoom. The 35 mm equivalent is 28-116 mm. The sensor is 7.2x5.3 mm. (1/1.8") (And I wish I knew someone who could explain how the heck they came up with sensor size terminology!)

I have another point & shoot that is actually a 5.7-17.1 mm zoom. This is a 3X zoom. The 35 mm equivalent is 34-102 mm. "How could a shorter focal length give a longer 35 mm equivalent?" you might ask. It's because the sensor is only about 5x4 mm. (1/2.5")

I have a few Nikon DSLR's and - thankfully - they all have the same size sensor. They all have a "lens factor" of 1.5. This means that you just multiply the actual focal length of the lens to get the 35 mm equivalent and then you can make comparisons accurately from camera-to-camera. Most Canon's, for instance, have a lens factor of 1.6. On a Nikon DSLR, a 28 mm lens is the "35 mm equivalent" of a 42 mm lens. On most Canon DSLR's, the same 28 mm lens is the equivalent of a 45 mm lens.

These example are just to show you how freaking confusing it can all become if you try to make sense of the "X" power of a zoom lens.

Bottom line...

Check the 35 mm equivalent specifications for the lens. This way, you will be leveling the field and comparing apples to apples. More or less.

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