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No audio in captured video from analog tape audio is not muted audio scrubber is nor redlined.

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I turned on my receiver and I do not get any sound, unless I crank up to max and then I get faint audio. The same when I use the head phone jack


NEVER USE MAXIMUM VOLUME FOR TROUBLESHOOTING.

Turn the volume control to something medium.

The errant switch, control or condition may change and you will suddenly release the amp's full power and possibly destroying your speakers. If a signal isn't audible at 1/2 volume it's probably not there.

Carefully examine the front panel for clues like a misplaced Source Selection, Mute, Tape Monitor control or Multichannel Analog Input selected.

There is a good chance that a common control may have developed a high-resistance or 'dead' spot through defect or idleness and is causing your symptom. Turn the POWER OFF and operate every control throughout its range a number of times, especially rarely-used ones like Tape Monitors and the Mute control.

Turn the volume to something reasonable and see if that helped.

Aug 07, 2011 | Onkyo Audio & Video Receivers

1 Answer

I have no sound out of the front speakers. Mute button is off, speakers work fine. Only have sound (very little) if volume is turned way up.


NEVER USE MAXIMUM VOLUME FOR TROUBLESHOOTING.

Turn the volume control to something medium.

The errant switch, control or condition may change and you will suddenly release the amp's
full power and possibly destroying your speakers. If a signal isn't audible at 1/2 volume
it's probably not there.

Carefully examine the front panel for clues like a misplaced Source Selection, Mute, Tape
Monitor control or Multichannel Analog Input selected.

There is a good chance that a common control may have developed a high-resistance or 'dead'
spot through defect or idleness and is causing your symptom. Turn the POWER OFF and operate
every control throughout its range a number of times, especially rarely-used ones like Tape
Monitors and the Mute control.

Turn the volume to something reasonable and see if that helped.

Jul 10, 2011 | Yamaha RX-V870 Receiver

1 Answer

Would I be able to connect Yamaha eq 70 equalizer to Yamaha av receiver RX-V1800 Thanks.


Be advised that the engagement of any device in a Tape Monitor loop on a late-model Audio/Video Receiver will effectively tie the receiver down to stereo-only analog sound reproduction. I'll explain.

The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop.

In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).

Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.

The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.

EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically converted to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose some form of STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Monitor as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.

In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? The rest would NOT be processed. That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Monitor is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that's the way it is. Nature of the digital beast.

Apr 16, 2011 | Yamaha RX-V1800

1 Answer

My receiver plays but i am not getting any sound from the cd player or DVD player or the TV through the reveiver


So it doesn't actually play anything, right.

Name the model for our benefit. Tell us if you've referred to the manual. Define the related sources or outputs and what you have done that works or not.


Did it EVER work?


Look for a misplaced Mute or Tape Monitor control or Multichannel Analog Input selected.

There is a good chance that a common control may have developed a high-resistance or 'dead' spot through idleness and is causing your symptom. Turn the POWER OFF and operate every control throughout its range a number of times, especially rarely-used ones like Tape Monitors and the Mute control.


Turn the volume to something reasonable and see if that helped.

Mar 10, 2011 | Samsung Audio & Video Receivers

1 Answer

Only one the left channel sends out a signal to the speakers -- whether using the "A" or the "B" options. Is this correctable without having to purchase a new unit?


Is it on all audio sources or only certain ones?


FM is the best source to use for testing basic receiver function because you can't mis-wire it.


If it's only analog source(s) doing it I would suspect a bad audio cable or a switch somewhere in the signal path. Typically, it might be a switch you rarely use, like a Tape Monitor or Mute Switch. It

Feb 06, 2011 | Audio & Video Receivers

1 Answer

How to connect my eq to my harman kardon recevier model avr-247


The following is some boilerplate I made up that should explain some usage limitations.


Be advised that the engagement of any device in a Tape Monitor loop on a late-model Audio/Video Receiver will effectively tie the receiver down to stereo-only analog sound reproduction. I'll explain.


The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop.


In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).


Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.


The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.


EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically converted to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose a STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Monitor as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.


In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? They would NOT be processed. That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Monitor is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that's the way it is. Nature of the digital beast.


Okay, back to the hook-up:


Any of the following audio connections on the HK will work: Tape, Vid1 or Vid 2.


Receiver Tape Out (Rec) - to the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Rec, Line-In;


Receiver Tape In (Play) - from the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Play , Line-Out.


So, to sum up, you can only use the EQ or any outboard processor for analog stereo sources. If you actually want to use an analog recording deck you could place it within the typical Equalizer

Feb 04, 2011 | Harman Kardon Audio & Video Receivers

1 Answer

No sound output from my pioneer vsx-1014k using either CD, tuner or home theater inputs.


IOW, no audio from anywhere.

If it otherwise looks alive...

WARNING: Never use maximum volume for troubleshooting. The errant switch or control that you eventually find and flip will suddenly release the amp's full power and you'll destroy your speakers. If a signal isn't audible at 1/2 volume it's probably not there.

Look for a misplaced Mute or Tape Monitor control or Multichannel Analog Input selected.

There is a good chance that a common control may have developed a high-resistance or 'dead' spot through idleness and is causing your symptom. Turn the POWER OFF and operate every control throughout its range a number of times, especially rarely-used ones like Tape Monitors and the Mute control.


Turn the volume to something reasonable and see if that helped.

Jan 19, 2011 | Pioneer VSX-1014 Receiver

1 Answer

How to install a audiosouse equalizer (eq 100) onto denon 3805 receiver, without a tape monitor thanks henry


Actually, you have several tape loops: CDR/Tape, VCR1 and VCR2. The bottom right part of Page 7 in the manual shows how to connect a Tape Deck (or any in/out processor).

Be advised that the engagement of any device in a Tape Monitor loop on a late-model Audio/Video Receiver will effectively tie the receiver down to stereo-only analog sound reproduction. I'll explain.

The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop.

In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).

Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.

The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.

EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically converted to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose a STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Monitor as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.

In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? They would NOT be processed. That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Monitor is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that's the way it is. Nature of the digital beast.

Okay, back to the hook-up: Receiver Tape- or VCR Out to the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Amp-, Tape- or Rec-In; Receiver Tape- or VCR In from the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Amp-, Tape- or Rec-Out.

I have a whole array of 2-channel analog processing electronics looped out of one Tape Loop on my AVR - via a dbx 400x Program Route Selector - for making tapes or CD-R Audio recordings and otherwise modifying the analog sound for various purposes.

Aug 12, 2010 | Denon AVR-3805 Receiver

1 Answer

Audio Problems playing VHS tapes with Denon AVR 1910


Did it EVER work as expected with VCR audio through the HDMI or are we working through that right now assuming it can?

I don't have a detailed manual, but the rear panel clearly shows some analog-only outputs (and NO digital ones) for the section called DVD/VCR. Internally, I'm sure there are proper analog-digital-converters for recording VHS to the native DVD-R, but VHS VCR's are NOT inherently digital audio devices so I'm pretty sure you need to run an analog RCA pair for the VHS video.

Feb 22, 2010 | Denon AVR588 Receiver

1 Answer

No audio on any channel, even in audio setup mode, no audio headp


If you have any of its sound outputs connected to a TV or tape deck do they get the signal? If so, then we know there is sound processing somewhere inside the unit but not emerging to anyplace that requires amplification.

A quick basic check would be to tune an FM station, run an RCA cable pair from the audio output for a tape deck (see the picture at the link) to an analog audio input on your TV. Select that input on the TV and you shouls hear the FM station, or anything the receiver is configured to play. If it's silent then there is no audio signal circulating in the receiver to get out to the amplifiers.

http://www.onkyousa.com/images/hookup/TX-SR803/detail_tapedeck.jpg

Check to make sure Multi-Channel input is not selected unless that is what you're listening to as it bypasses all other sources analog and digital EXCEPT the tape; and check any Mute or Zone Controls, too.

If you hear the program on the TV but not through any attached speakers, then the amplifiers are all disabled for some reason. The click I asked about before... when you turn it on does it get a click about 5 seconds later. That would be the protection circuitry turning OFF to allow the amplifiers to function.

I notice it has a Tape function. Make sure it isn't selected as it assumes a tape deck or processor is attached and will only play back what would be coming FROM the tape deck or processor. On my Pioneer receiver it also disables any digital signal processing.

Sometimes when I'm watching TV with the remote on the seat someone moves and something bad happens. It's always some unfamiliar button that gets touched unintentionally. Look over the remote for things like MUTE, Multi-CH, Tape.

Apr 02, 2009 | Onkyo TX-SR803 Receiver

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