Question about Acoustic Research AR3 Speaker

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I have original AR3a speakers. Both speakers have T1 and 2 shorted with wire in the back, but still I am not getting sound on the tweeter and mid on both speakers? I got positive wire(red) on 1 and negative on 2. Any idea how to troubleshoot this? How do I open the grill? Where do I probe the ohmeter to see if there is a disconnect or blown part?

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An ohmmeter wont help from the terminals as the mid and tweet will have capacitors in series and wont tell you ohms --the woofer can be read however and those are the bottom terminals --can you unscrew the crossover on the back and read ohms from there? traditionaly the blue wire is for the tweeter and the green is the mid ,ohm either to the black wire from where they first solder to the board--should be approx 6ohms each

Posted on Sep 04, 2010

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I have the same problem with my AR-3 speakers (circa 1967) To remove the grill you simply have to loosen the grill cloth on the long side of the speaker and then cut the cloth straight across. Having done that you can take a heavy knife or pryer and carefully start loosening the glue that is holding the grill frame in position. (plastic molded frame) AR went crazy with glue! So go slowly the grill frame will come loose with a bit of firm careful prying.
NOTE: The grill was originally designed to slide into a alcove on each end of the enclosure.
DL

Posted on Nov 10, 2010

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Hi,i hear alot about bi wireing could someone explain what it actually is used for and what's it meant to do could I'm thinking bout trying it on my speakers?


It's a big job, but the results are great. Bi amp-ing is where the tweeters and mid range speakers are separated and connected to separate amplifiers. You'll need to have the correct gear before messing inside your speakers. You'll need to have another amplifier. Not knowing what amp you have now, getting a stereo signal into the second amp may be a problem since you'll need a line level signal into the second amp. An external crossover is best. Technically, you could use the ones in the speakers, since you'll be removing them anyway. Now for the speaker mods: On the panel where the posts for the speaker wires are you'll need to install another set of binding posts. We're assuming you have separate subs. Open the speakers and remove the cross over. The wires from the original posts should now connect to the mid range speaker. Add wires from the second set of posts and wire it to the tweeters. Now connect the output of the amp to the removed cross over and wire the mid range out on the cross over to the posts that connect to the mid range speaker. Do the same for the tweeters.If you have three way speakers, you'll have to run a 3rd set of wires from the crossover to the woofers in the cabinet using another set of binding posts. Controlling the volume on the second amp will be difficult since you'll have to adjust it manually. Remote control volume level will be lost on the second amp.

Aug 08, 2015 | Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

Hooking up speakers


first off stock wiring for speakers,and or amp are with minimal wiring.Rewire system for better sound quality,also use noise suppresors if needed.

Jan 18, 2014 | Toyota Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

No sound from tweeter bx5a


First of all, never connect the audio from your receiver directly to the tweeter. You can blow the tweeter instantly. The mid-bass driver can be damaged from a direct connection as well.

Since you get absolutely no sound from either driver, this seems to implicate the crossover. If the crossover has opened, no signal gets through, if it has opened early in the signal path.

But, it is also possible that a short exists, and that perhaps your amp cuts off the output having sensed a short. The short could be in the crossover or one of the drivers.

Here are some troubleshooting tips--

To prevent damage to your amp, turn it off while making or breaking any connections inside the speaker boxes.

Write down which wires get connected to which place on the drivers, so you can get them back where they belong.

With your amp turned off, connect the bad speaker to your amp. You've already verified that no sound is produced when both drivers are connected.

So, with your amp off, disconnect one wire from the tweeter in the bad box.

Briefly turn your amp on and listen for sound.

If you get sound, the tweeter is shorted.

If you get no sound, with the amp off, reconnect the tweeter in the bad box and disconnect one wire from the mid-bass driver.

Briefly turn the amp on and listen before turning the amp off.

If you get sound now, but not before, the mid-bass driver is shorted.

If you got no sound either way, check the DC resistance of the mid-bass driver (only, not the tweeter. Ohmmeters put out a small DC voltage to test resistance. That DC voltage might damage a tweeter, maybe. Don't risk it). Ohm the mid-bass driver while it is not connected to the crossover. If the driver is good, you should read some ohms--a little less than the stated impedance. An 8 ohm driver might read 6.5 ohms, for instance. If you get an open or a short (with the crossover disconnected from the mid-bass driver) you have a blown driver. Two actually, since neither the tweeter nor the mid-bass driver produced any sound in the previous tests.

If you can't get ahold of an ohmmeter, try this--

Open the good, working speaker and place the two side by side.

Connect your amp to the bad speaker box only.

With your amp turned off, disconnect the wires from the mid-bass driver in the bad box and connect them to the mid-bass driver in the good box. Disconnect one of the wires from the "good" mid-bass driver first, so you don't have two crossovers connected to it at the same time--even if only one of them will get powered on. It keeps the confusion down to a minimum when trying to isolate your problem. Oh, and disconnect one wire from the bad tweeter, in case it is shorted.

Turn the amp on and listen briefly before turning the amp off.

If you got sound, the "bad" crossover is fine, but the "bad" mid-bass driver is blown. And, since you got no sound in the previous tests, the "bad" tweeter is blown, as well.

If you got no sound, try it the other way around. Meaning--

With the amp off, disconnect the speaker wires coming from your amp from the bad speaker box and connect them to the good speaker box.

Your amp is now connected only to the good speaker box.

With the amp still off, connect the mid-bass wires from the good box to the mid-bass driver in the bad box. Remember to disconnect one of the "bad" crossover wires from its own driver first, so only one crossover is connected to the "bad" mid-midbass driver. Remember to disconnect one wire from the "good" and "bad" tweeters, so the only sound you hear--if any--is from the "bad" mid-bass driver, powered by the "good" crossover.

If this produces sound, but the previous attempts failed, you have a crossover problem.

If you still get no sound, something went wrong and you need to retest the good speaker by itself and back up a few steps and try again.

Assuming you got sound from the "good" crossover while it was driving your "bad" mid-bass, make sure no wires have come loose inside the "bad" box. Assuming you have sound connections at each end of each wire, you now need to desolder the electrolytic capacitors from the circuit board.

Make sure you mark them first, so you can put them back where they belong.

You can remove only one at a time, if that helps.

Use an ohmmeter to check some components.

The big red coil should read pretty close to a short, maybe one ohm.

The capacitors should read open or infinite resistance, although you might see a steadily increasing resistance while the capacitor charges up from the ohmmeter. If you read a steady low resistance on a capacitor after it has been removed from the circuit board, that capacitor is bad and must be replaced. The markings on the capacitor should give you some clues as to the proper replacement.

All things considered, I suspect that your problem is a shorted electrolytic capacitor. But, I gave you all I could think of so you can narrow it down and isolate the problem, whatever it might be.

I hope this helps.

Feb 23, 2011 | M-Audio BX5a Speaker

1 Answer

The tweeter and upper mid-range speaker quit working in one of my JBL s412p speakers. All wires are connected. Would this be a cross-over assembly problem? If so, where can I purchase a replacement?


Remove the speaker wire from your amplifier. Using a 1.5v battery place the wire on both ends of the battery. Observe if you can hear a cracking sound on the tweeter and the mid-range. If there is no sound., your speaker is busted and needs to be rewind or replaced.

Dec 06, 2010 | JBL S412P Main / Stereo Speaker

1 Answer

Can't get wharfedale melton 2 tweeter to work. Looked inside cabinet and need advice on internal wiring please. These are very old but one works perfectly and the 12'' bass driver on the problem speaker is...


The tweeter has burned out and cannot be salvaged. I also own a pair of (ex) Melton 2s. In the beginning Wharfedale were good at supplying spares (see www.wharfedale.co.uk for contact info and advice). A few years ago after my cat destroyed the 12 inch unit in one, i invested in new insides, including state of the art 12 inch woofers, 4 inch mid range and 1inch tweeters with a good 3 way crossover. The cabinet is great so consider asking a techie friend to do this for you. Please don't just cut out and connect to amp speaker wires! You will get terrible sound and risk ruining both amp and speakers! Best regards Karl (karl@simpson.nom.fr)

May 12, 2010 | Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

Stock audio wiring diagram


Car Radio Battery Constant 12v+ Wire: Green
Car Radio Accessory Switched 12v+ Wire: Green/Orange
Car Radio Ground Wire: Black
Car Radio Illumination Wire: Red/Blue
Car Stereo Dimmer Wire: Yellow
Car Stereo Antenna Trigger Wire: N/A
Car Stereo Amp Trigger Wire: N/A
Car Stereo Amplifier Location: Under the Driver Seat.
Car Audio Front Speakers Size: N/A
Car Audio Front Speakers Location: N/A
Left Front Tweeter Speaker Positive Wire (+): Blue
Left Front Tweeter Speaker Negative Wire (-): Brown/Red
Left Front Mid Speaker Positive Wire (+): Black
Left Front Mid Speaker Negative Wire (-): White
Left Front Low Speaker Positive Wire (+): Yellow
Left Front Low Speaker Negative Wire (-): Blue
Right Front Tweeter Speaker Positive Wire (+): Blue/Orange
Right Front Tweeter Speaker Negative Wire (-): Green/Orange
Right Front Mid Speaker Positive Wire (+): Black
Right Front Mid Speaker Negative Wire (-): Brown/Red
Right Front Low Speaker Positive Wire (+): Black
Right Front Low Speaker Negative Wire (-): White
Car Audio Rear Speakers Size: N/A
Car Audio Rear Speakers Location: N/A
Left Rear Speaker Positive Wire (+): Blue
Left Rear Speaker Negative Wire (-): Green
Right Rear Speaker Positive Wire (+): Yellow
Right Rear Speaker Negative Wire (-): Blue

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May 11, 2010 | 2003 Kia Sorento

1 Answer

Just the tweeter is playing and not the mid


It's a midrange component speaker. Possibly your midrange speaker is blown. Check your wiring.

You hear the tweeters i am assuming because the vehicle has tweeter component speakers that are separate from the midrange and low components.

Apr 19, 2010 | VIFA P17WJ-00-08 Car Mid-Range Speaker

1 Answer

No sound out of tweeters, highs out of woofers?


it does sound like you shorted out your crossover which can be fixed if you know what you are doing, but in the long run i would try to get another one i know that raidoshack sells some small ones and is also cheap, if your positive that you didnt short out the crossover se if it needs power, see if you can cross your woffers and tweeters on the crossover, if not is there any settings that u can change on the crossover? hope i helped :)

Apr 28, 2009 | Jl Audio VR650-CSi Car Component System

1 Answer

Bi-amp


After examining a picture of a 5802 ( I have been servicing adcom for over 20 years ), these are not bi amp posts, but bi wire posts.

Bi-amp means that 2 amps are being used, one for highs, one for lows. This means that you have no crossovers in the speakers, instead, you have an electronic crossover between the amps and the pre-amp. The highs and lows are separated in the electronic crossover. One amp handles the lows, one handles the highs.

Bi-wire means that you have the crossovers still inside the speakers. The amp handles the full range of music ( highs-mids-lows ). Different kinds of speaker wire produce different results. If you have bi-Wire terminals on your speaker, they come with shorting wires, that tie the tweeter + to the woofer + on the back of the speaker, and the tweeter - to the woofer - . When the shorting wires are removed completely, you have now electrically separated the tweeter and woofer from each other, while maintinaing the crossovers ( inside the speaker ) for each.When this is done, you can now bi-wire the speakers and amp, and use different kinds of wire for the lower frequencies and the upper frequencies, depending on your ears ( everyone hears a little differently, thats why there are so may makers of components, and wire ).

Why do we have crossovers?.....the tweeter voice coils ( the things that make the sound ) are made of hair thin wire. This wire cannot handle much power and if you were to put bass in to a tweeter, you would burn the tweeter out almost instantly. A tweeter is a very light, fast moving device which can react very quickly to high frequency sounds ( symbols, triangles, guitar strings....). Woofers are more rugged. They have voice coils made of heavier wire and are designed for larger movements that Bass demands. Subsequently, woofers aren't very good for high frequencies because they are slower devices.

So what do we do ?.....Keep the lows away from the tweter and the highs away from the woofer.....thats the job of the crossover.

In the event that your speaker has the crossover OUTSIDE the speaker box, you should check ( as always ) with the manufacturer of the speaker to see how it can be changed to suit your needs. Remember to always read and follow your owners manual. Good luck....Rob

Feb 22, 2008 | Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

No sound from mids and bass


there is prolly just a short in the wire somewhere

Nov 28, 2007 | RCA RS2656 Shelf System

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