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Where is the evaporator for the refrigerator half The refrigerator is not cooling. The condenser lines are not hot, so no heat is being picked up. There is no evidencer of a leak. where is the evaporator located. I need to see if it is plugged.

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Hi,

Check out these tips...they can help you figure out whats going wrong with your refrigerator and why it is not cooling

Refrigerator not Cooling or Fridge not Cooling

How to Defrost Refrigerator Defrost Timer Problem

Water Running in refrigerator from Freezer

heatman101

Posted on Sep 03, 2010

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6ya6ya
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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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In garage/works perfectly/slow leak coming from an insulated hose that goes directly into the bottom of the freezer itself.


The hose coming from the bottom of the freezer is draining the melted water produced during the automatic defrost cycle. Usually the water is collected in a pan somewhere around the hot compressor motor so the heat can evaporate the water.

The hot copper tube by the compressor is the high pressure tube going to the condenser. The other tube going to the compressor is the return line from the evaporator and, after normal operation, is cold to the touch. It is this cold refrigerant returning to the compressor that cools the motor.

Aug 19, 2015 | Refrigerators

Tip

Why your unit is freezing up.


To understand why your AC or heat pump is freezing up, it helps to know how your system works.

There are 7 major parts to an AC system, 9 with a heat pump.

1 - Condenser/heat pump (The outdoor unit)
2 - Air Handler (the indoor unit unless the system is a package unit, then all is outside in one system. The air handler is usually found under the home, in an attic, or in a closet.)

In the condenser are the following major parts.

3 - Compressor
4 - Condenser coil
5 - Condenser fan
6 - (HPs only) reversing valve

In the air handler are the following major parts.

7 - Blower motor
8 - Evaporator coil
9 - (HPs only) electric heat strips

Some systems known as "dual fuel systems" use another heat source in place of the heat strips, usually a gas furnace. I will address gas furnaces in another post.

When an air conditioner is operating properly several things are taking place.

1 - The compressor is compressing or "pumping" refrigerant through the system.

2 - through changes in pressure, the refrigerant makes the evaporator coil get very cold, and the condenser coil gets very hot.

3 - The blower motor/fan circulates air across the evaporator coils, as the room temperature air (Also known as "indoor ambient") goes through the cold coil, it exits, cooled approximately 15 to 20 degrees cooler than when it entered. (In a ducted system, the blower is also the fan that circulates the air throughout the home.)

4 - The condenser fan circulates air across the condenser coils. As the outdoor air goes through the condenser coil, it removes heat from the coils that are very hot. This in turn removes heat from the refrigerant so it can run its cycle again, and through pressure changes, cool the evap coil.

5 - With a heat pump, the reversing valve reverses the flow of refrigerant in the condenser and evaporator coils.
In AC mode, the evaporator coils get cold, and the condenser coils get hot. But in heat mode, the evaporator gets very hot, and the condenser very cold.

Now, whichever coil is getting cold will freeze up if there is inadequate air flow across the coil, as the refrigerant in it is far below freezing, and there is not enough airflow to keep the humidity in the air from freezing on the coil.

Things that can cause poor airflow are,

1 - Dirty/clogged coils
2 - dirty/clogged filter (will only effect evaporator coil)
3 - Closed/blocked vents (will only effect evaporator coil)
4 - Malfunctioning or dirty fan

Low refrigerant will also cause a coil to freeze up, reduce efficiency and cause the system to run for long periods of time. Not to mention, shortening the life of the unit.

With a heat pump, in heat mode only, the condenser (outdoor) coil will routinely begin to freeze up in cold temperatures. This is due to the fact that the refrigerant is below freezing, and the cold outdoor ambient temp is not warm enough to keep the condensation in the air from freezing on the coil.

Note, a properly working AC should never freeze up.

A heat pump is equipped with defrost controls to prevent ice buildup.
Some are controlled by timers, some by temp.

When a HP is going into defrost mode, the condenser fan shuts down, the reversing valve reverses the flow of refrigerant and the once cold condenser coil now gets very hot, defrosting the coil. (Many people have said this process sounds like the unit is coming apart, or about to explode and are frightened by the "smoke" which is really just steam from melting ice that comes off the unit.)

During defrost mode, the secondary or "auxiliary" heat comes on to ensure that you are still getting warm air from the vents. (Again, this can be electric heat strips or a dual fuel system)

If you are experiencing cold air from the vents during defrost, that means your auxiliary heat is malfunctioning.

The auxiliary heat is used for three purposes.

1 - during defrost mode to maintain warm airflow (automatic)
2 - when the HP cannot maintain the set temp due to extreme outdoor temps. It comes on when the indoor temp drops several degrees below the set temp on the thermostat (automatic)
3 - For emergency heat source when the HP is not working. (Manual)

To recap....

Iced up coils?

Poor airflow
low refrigerant
Malfunctioning fan
failing defrost system


There are two things that can be done in a pinch to help de-ice frozen coils. This may get you by until the repairman can get there, or you can fix the system if you are a do-it-yourselfer.

HPs frozen outdoor coil in heat mode, not going into defrost?

Cover most of the vents, and turn the system onto cooling mode until the outdoor coil is thawed. then uncover vents and return to heat, or emergency heat. (this usually takes 15 min or less)

Frozen coils in AC mode with a heat pump?
Turn the system to heat with the thermostat on just high enough to get the system to come on. (again, usually takes 15 min or less to thaw.)

AC only, with frozen evap coils? (this can sometimes be seen frozen all the way outside to the compressor on the copper lines.)

Turn the system off, and the fan switch from "auto" to on".
This will usually defrost the coils within 1 to 2 hours.
(If your system has the furnace in line before the evap coil, turn the system to heat, and the furnace will defrost the coil within minutes.)



on Dec 25, 2008 | Carrier XHB123D X/Y Series Heat/Cool Air...

1 Answer

A copper thin tube from the unit is very hot. Is it normal?


Yes, well somewhat normal. The refrigerant leaves the compressor at high temperature and flows through the condenser coil where it cools about 20 degrees warmer than the outside air flowing through the condenser. Many small air conditioner units use a small copper tube (capillary tube) of a specific diameter and length for that system to cause a decrease in refrigerant pressure between the condenser and the evaporator. The refrigerant leaves the compressor as a gas at high pressure, cools in the condenser and changes into a liquid. The liquid flows through the cap tube and cools more as the pressure decreases and gets closer to the evaporator. The refrigerant boils and evaporates under the low pressure of the evaporator and turns back into a gas. That gas is pulled back to the compressor.
If the condenser is not cooling the refrigerant enough, the tube can become extra hot. Efficiency is reduced. Actual temperatures throughout the system depend on the type refrigerant used, suction and discharge pressure at the compressor, outside and inside temperature. Tables, charts and graphs for various pressure-temperature relationships can be found in refrigeration books and chemical web sites.

Mar 17, 2015 | Carrier FB4ANF060 HVAC Electric Unit & AC...

1 Answer

Using as heater and unit is blowing cold air


A heat pump is an air conditioner that reverses its refrigerant flow. In the cooling mode, the evaporator is cold to the room and its condenser is hot. In the heating mode, a valve reverses the refrigerant flow and makes the evaporator warm and the condenser cold.

Nov 24, 2013 | Soleus 10,000 Btu Portable Ac Air...

1 Answer

Conair mini split heat pump isn't cooling but has cold suction line but warm liquid line and is not freezing up the evaporator. Thinking a sucking reversing valve?? What could cause that? Both evapor


Make sure that your refrigerant charge is good first. Reversing valve has 4 pipes coming off of it. The one alone is discharge and centre of 3 is suction always. The two sides are the reversing pipes. One side should be same temp as discharge and other same temp (+-5F) as suction. If not then you have bypassing refrigerant in valve. Bad.

Jul 13, 2013 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

Lennox 10HPB36-10P is blowing luke warm air.


What coil is getting cold? In cooling the evaporator coil should be getting cold not the outdoor condensing coil. Verify you have the tstat setup for heat pump, verify you have a proper refrigerant charge.

Apr 19, 2017 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

Took car to shop today with A/C problem that developed yesterday. A/C was cycling on and off (cool air not the blower), then finally stopped. Shop said there was "power" at the clutch but...


your clutch can be good and the compressor has gone bad, The compressor puts the refrigerant under pressure and sends it to the condensing coils. In your car, these coils are generally in front of the radiator. Compressing a gas makes it quite hot. In the condenser, this added heat and the heat the refrigerant picked up in the evaporator is expelled to the air flowing across it from outside the car. When the refrigerant is cooled to its saturation temperature, it will change phase from a gas back into a liquid (this gives off a bundle of heat known as the "latent heat of vaporization"). The liquid then passes through the expansion valve to the evaporator, the coils inside of your car, where it loses pressure that was added to it in the compressor. This causes some of the liquid to change to a low-pressure gas as it cools the remaining liquid. This two-phase mixture enters the evaporator, and the liquid portion of the refrigerant absorbs the heat from the air across the coil and evaporates. Your car's blower circulates air across the cold evaporator and into the interior. The refrigerant goes back through the cycle again and again.

Jul 13, 2011 | Air Conditioning and Heat for Suzuki Aerio

2 Answers

CONDENSATE LOOP


Hi, A condensate loop in a refrigerator is any device that produce heat in certain areas, most commom is around refrigerator door, which are mullion heaters that produce mild heat, to prevent ice build up around doors, prevent door gasket from getting stuck, another type of condensate loop are found under or back of most refrigerator, hot gas line from compressor, sometimes are loop under ref. or other location of ref. before it is connect to ref. condenser, most ref. condensate loop are used to evaporate water collected from evaporator. to prevent clouding of glass on doors, etc, and it could be electrical, or mechanical, base on applications.

Aug 06, 2009 | Federal Industries CGR5042DZ Commercial...

1 Answer

MY FREEZE DOES NOT FREEZ BUT IS COOLD DOES IT NEEDS GAS


When the compressor is running, two fans should be running. One inside the freezer compartment that moves air over the evaporator coils. The other is under/behind the fridge that cools the condenser coils.

If the fan on the condenser coil (the one under/behind the fridge) stops working, the system cannot dissipate the heat from those coils, and thus cannot sufficiently cool the inside of either the freezer nor fresh food compartment.

On mine, when the condenser fan failed, I noticed right away. The front face of the wall separating the compartments became very hot. Extremely hot.

Apparently the refrigeration system is designed so that waste heat keeps condensation from forming where the magnetic gaskets on the door need to seal. When the condenser fan failed, there was too much waste heat (because no heat was being dissipated from the condenser coils by the fan), thus making that gasket-sealing area very hot.

If it is your condenser coil fan, you can relieve the problem temporarily by removing the bottom back panel from the fridge and aiming a box fan (a regular room or window fan) at the condenser coils. This will circulate air over the coils, thus removing heat from the coils.


Jul 29, 2009 | GE GSH25JFR Side by Side Refrigerator

1 Answer

Rudd 2 ton 10 S


The small copper line should not be really hot its supposed to be carrying liquid refrigerant which has already had the heat "pressed" out of it by the compressor and carried of by the air flowing over the condenser coil. This could indicate a few things; that your unit is overcharged, you have a mismatched evaporator coil and condenser, an ineffective condenser fan motor or a clogged condenser coil and as a result your compressor is shutting of due to an overload condition from the building heat and back pressure between the compressor outlet and the evaporator inlet.

First make sure your condenser is clean and that adequate air is flowing over the fins of the condenser coil. Then be sure your equipment is a matched system. A indication that your condenser fan motor is not at speed is slow starting a humming sound and excessive heat. In my experience this complaint is generally the result of a bad condenser fan motor that over heats and shuts of after a short period and the build up of heat in the liquid refrigerant line of course trips the compressor overload circuit- which by the way usually takes hours to reset. I hope you've already resolved this, but in case you haven't......

Aug 01, 2008 | Ruud Matching Split Air Conditioner

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