Question about EliteGroup P4VXASD (P4VXASD-R) Motherboard

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Upgrade of WinXP home to SP2 failed on 3 attempts. System just reboots and reboots. Got message from Microsoft that my bios does not match the CPU. MB is P4VXASD. BIOS is AMI 07.00T ver 2.3 4/2/2001

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Hi, you give us the M/B and Bios but don't say what the CPU is? What is the complete message you got from WinXP? SP2 often gives that message when you have changed your CPU, or Flashed your BIOS sometimes other hardware changes. SP2 recognises that something has changed since your first install of XP, and that message is usually not an error exactly, but part of a bigger message. That is usually just the part where SP2 says "by the way, as I was fiddling about I noticed that the BIOS and CPU are different to what I expected" Failures after applying a service pack are rarely anything to do ith BIOS or CPU especially if the system was working OK before applying the patch. Have you Flashed your BIOS very recently? like just before apply SP2? Most likely is that a file is corrupt, often NTKRNL, Please give more detail on how you applied the Spack, and all error messages thanks SB

Posted on Sep 02, 2010

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What is the possible problem when your computer is automatic shutdown while using?


A number of things - all bad.
If I were betting on problems I've experienced, I'd be betting on reasons #5, #6 (memory), or
reason #8 (overheating due to failing fan), unless its reason #3 (virus).

(1) you laptop (if you have a laptop) battery is dying, and the system is hibernating in response to the low power indication.
(2) your computer's "Standby" button is being accidentally pressed (or the button has failed), and the computer is going into "Standby mode" since it thinks that the "Standby" button has just been pressed.
(3) a virus/worm/Trojan horse/spyware or other malware infecting your system can cause a system restart. While your computer is actually up, run an anti-virus scan and let it run until the system
shuts itself down, and keep running these anti-virus scans until it finds something, or the scan
finally runs to completion. Only when malware is eliminated as the cause of your system shutdowns can you proceed to address any other cause(s) of random system restarts/shutdowns.
(4) You're accidentally pressing the system "Reset" or "Power off" button (if you system is a tower).
(5) Your computer has developed a memory error in the area of RAM where the kernel is resident.
(6) Your computer has developed a memory error in the area of RAM where the ROM BIOS is loaded.
In the case of #5, or #6 perform an in-depth system memory diagnostic using your system's
ROM BIOS resident diagnostics. Access these diagnostic programs by entering SETUP while
your system is booting - usually by holding down F2 (or other system-specific function key) while the system is booting.
(7) Other software problem(s)
In this case, boot your system (and use it for awhile) in SAFE MODE. Safe mode is selected by holding down F8 (or other system specific function key). If you system does not randomly restart while in safe mode, then you have a software problem causing the restarts when in "nonSafe mode"

For Windows XP users

Windows XP is designed to automatically reboot each time an error occurs such as a BSoD (Blue Screen of Death). Although this may be nice for errors that do not occur often, users who have a re-occurring error may wish to identify the error to troubleshoot it. Below are the steps on how this feature can be disabled and enabled in Windows XP.

1. From the desktop right-click on My Computer.
2. Click the Properties option.
3. In the System Properties window click the Advanced tab.
4. In Advanced click the Settings button under Startup and Recovery.
5. In the Startup and Recovery window uncheck the Automatically restart check box.
6. Click Ok.

Now if the computer generates an error it should not automatically restart and enable you to display any errors your computer may be experiencing.

(8) Possible Heat related issue

Many computers today are designed to turn off or automatically reboot if the computer, processor, or other device in your computer gets too hot. If you have heard any abnormal noises coming from your computer recently such as a high squealing this could indicate a fan may be failing in your computer. If the CPU fan is starting to fail, the motherboard will shutdown the PC when the CPU
temperature exceeds a CMOS-set threshold, which protects the CPU from a thermal meltdown.

First, verify the fan on the power supply is working by examining the back of the computer and see if the fan is moving and moving smoothly. For all other fans in the computer (e.g. CPU fan and/or
a tower case fan (if you system has one)) you will need to either open the computer and visually verify that all fans are working.

If your BIOS monitors the RPM of the fans enter CMOS Setup and verify it does not report any errors.

(9) Issue with the operating system (operating system bug)

If after following each of the above recommendations your computer still continues to reboot it is likely that you are experiencing a Microsoft Windows operating system related issue (an operating system bug). To help make sure this is the case try the below steps.

1. Reboot the computer and enter CMOS setup as the computer is booting.
2. After you have loaded the computer in CMOS setup let the computer sit for a long time.

If the computer does not reboot while letting the computer sit in CMOS it is likely that you are in fact experiencing an issue with Microsoft Windows and it is recommend that if you have followed all of the above recommendations that you reinstall Microsoft Windows - or, since you're running
WinXP Service Pack 2, you may want to simply install (free) Service pack 3 and/or Service Pack 4,
and see if that resolves the operating system bug issue. Note that Windows XP SP2 is a particularly stable version of Windows, and it is unlikely that your "random restart" issue is going to be an operating system bug.

Sep 19, 2011 | Microsoft Windows XP Professional SP2

Tip

How to change your winxp sp2 to sp3


there is some games you can't play in winxp sp2, like gta IV online.
you have to reinstall or format your computer just to turn your operating system in winxp sp3, just to play this game. do'nt waste your time to format or reinstall your hard drive just follow this quick step




Step 1: Run Regedit by Clicking on Start -> Run , type in regedit and press enter
Step 2: Make a backup of your registry (just in case)
Step 3: Browse to "HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESYSTEMCurrentControlSetControlWindows"
Step 4: Modify the value of "CSDVersion" from "0x00000200" (SP2) to the Windows XP SP3 value of "0x00000300"
Step 5: Close registry editor
Step 6: Reboot
Step 7: Start GTA and freakin enjoy it already!

on Jan 16, 2010 | Microsoft Windows XP Professional SP2

1 Answer

How to solve pci.sys error during reformating of the hard drive


You have two ways to solve the problem of "Pci.sys Is Missing or Corrupt"
Error Message When You Start Windows.

1.Booting with WinXP CD to access the Recovery Console’s Repair option,
and then copy from WinXP CD the missing or damaged Pci.sys file to
Systemdrive:\Windows\System32\drivers folder , Exit and Reboot.

start the recovery console and type:
set AllowAllPaths = true
expand d:\i386\pci.sy_ c:\windows\system\drivers32 /y
If you don't type
set AllowAllPaths = true you can't access the windows folder.

2. Booting with WinXP CD and then perform a Windows XP Repair Reinstall
of the currently installed system.

If you need detailed assistance post with details of your Operating system
[WinXP Home vs WinXP Pro and the SP status i.e SP1 or SP2 ]

See
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=319136

Jan 12, 2010 | Microsoft Windows XP Home Edition

1 Answer

IBM T42 gave fan error, replaced and can not get it to reboot


make sure the fan is pluged in correctly and you didnt unplug anything else such as memory or etc or bump the cpu... did you put any thermal paste on the cpu when you put the fan on it? its needed to bond the too together to make a better cooling system there maybe a setting in your bios to disable fan monitoring or cpu temp etc have to look at your bios to see

May 27, 2009 | IBM ThinkPad T42 Notebook

1 Answer

Windows XP SP2 Repair


Solution: Rename the C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32\CATROOT2 folder to something such as catold to prevent WinXP's Setup program from locating the folder and halting the installation. If you are still in Setup, press SHIFT-F10 to launch a command prompt from within Setup. At the command prompt, type cd\win dows\System32 to open the System32 folder and then type rename CATROOT2 catold, press ENTER, restart the computer, and attempt the upgrade again.

If you cannot reach a command prompt from Setup, reboot the computer from a Win95, Win98, or WinMe startup disk and rename the folder from the command prompt. You can also launch a command prompt by booting from the WinXP installation CD and running the Recovery Console.

Mar 25, 2009 | Toshiba Satellite 5105-S501 Notebook

2 Answers

My windows cannot open exefile and I cannot install spybotsd162.


Dear johan_poliwa, ur windows installer has corrupted or have been deleted. The best possible solution is that u format ur OS.

Mar 19, 2009 | Microsoft Windows Vista Home Basic Edition

1 Answer

Frezes at verifying DMI settings. Already changed MB and Power supply. Lan connection only flashes green once in a while should be constant. Tried on a working terminal and does the same.


The Desktop Management Interface (DMI) is a new
method of managing computers in an enterprise. The
main component of DMI is the Management Information
Format Database, or MIFD (the DMI Pool Data). This
database contains all the information about the
computing system and its components.
At times, some systems may experience hang
conditions after partitioning, formatting and initial
bootup of a hard drive. The message, "Verifying DMI
Pool Data" appears and the system hangs. This
condition may continue after the drive has been
removed.
! WARNING ! ALL SUGGESTIONS LISTED IN THIS
INFORMATION BULLETIN ARE BIOS RELATED. FOR
A PERMANENT SOLUTION, MAXTOR RECOMMENDS
THAT USERS CONSULT THEIR SYSTEM OR
MOTHERBOARD MANUFACTURER FOR BIOS
UPGRADES.
Suggestions to Resolve the Condition:
1.Apply power to the computer. 
2.Access the system BIOS. 
Set the drive type as None or Not Installed. 
Load BIOS Defaults 
Load SETUP Defaults 
3.Save the BIOS changes and reboot the PC to a
System Boot Diskette. 
4.Shut down the PC after the memory count is
displayed. 
5.Reconnect the power and interface cables to the
hard drive. 
6.Access the System BIOS. 
7.Auto-Detect the hard drive. Ensure that the LBA
Mode option is enabled. 
8.Save the BIOS changes and boot the PC with a
System Diskette. 
9.Partition and format the hard drive via the
operating system. 
10.Reboot the system. On bootup, the screen should
read: 
Verifying DMI Pool Data
Update Successful
The system should continue booting normally.
Other Possible Solutions:
1.Apply power to the computer. 
2.Access the System BIOS. 
3.Disable both the Internal and External CPU Cache.
These features are located in either the "BIOS
Features" or "Advanced Settings" options of the
BIOS Setup.
NOTE: Consult the System or Motherboard User's
Manual for exact location of the Internal and
External CPU Cache settings. 
4.Save the BIOS changes and reboot the PC to a
System Boot Diskette. On bootup, the screen
should read: 
Verifying DMI Pool Data
Update Successful
The system should continue booting normally.
5.After the system successfully boots, re-start the
PC and access the system BIOS. 
6.Enable the External CPU Cache. This feature is
located in the "BIOS Features" or "Advanced
Settings".
NOTE: Consult the System or Motherboard User's
Manual for exact location of the External CPU
Cache setting.
! WARNING ! User's MUST re-enable this feature
for optimal system performance. 
7.Save the BIOS changes and reboot the PC to a
System Boot Diskette. On bootup, the screen
should read: 
Verifying DMI Pool Data
Update Successful
The system should continue booting normally.
NOTE: If the aforementioned suggestions fail to
resolve the issue, contact the system or motherboard
manufacturer to:
Remove the "Clear CMOS" Jumper and reset the
system BIOS 
Obtain a Flash BIOS Upgrade

from pc help;
SYSTEM HANGS AT MESSAGE: "VERIFYING DMA POOL DATA":
You did not say what operating system you are running but I assume Windows 95 or 98. It is possible some Windows
system files are corrupted or perhaps the system doesn't like your ram (if you added or installed ram recently). There
is also a possibility that there is something wrong with your BIOS and you *may* have to update it, but I would avoid
doing that if at all possible.
A quick fix - if the problem is software related - is to:
1. boot to a Windows startup disk (one that matches your operating system). this step assumes that your PC is setup
to boot to the A: drive before the C: drive (via the BIOS SETUP program). If you don't have a Windows startup disk,
you will have to make one on another person's computer that has the same version of Windows. You make one via:
my_computer/control_panel/add_remove_programs/startup_disk
2. run "scandisk c:" to make sure that any file corruption is fixed before going to next step
3. do a "sys c:" from the "a:" prompt to transfer a good copy of Windows system files to c: drive
4. remove the boot floppy, reboot the system and see if all is well.
If that does not solve the problem you may have to reinstall Windows 95/98. Ouch!
I recently had someone bring me a computer that had this DMI error message problem and I tried the "sys c:" method
(with the startup disk) without success and had to entirely reinstall windows 95 (and almost all applications except for
some programs that did not need to be placed in any Program Files directory or other special location) to cure the
problem. However nasty a job that is, it did cure the problem.


Jun 23, 2008 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

UPGRADING PROCESOR


Make sure your BIOS can handle an upgraded CPU. I would go into bios, check the "default" or "fail safe" boot option and then power down. Lift keyboard or access your CPU and change out. Remember to touch something metallic before you operate so you discharge any static electricity (killed a CPU and a video card by not doing this ONCE) Boot up and notice any BIOS messages, may want to start in safe mode just to get a basic working config going, then power down, access BIOS and start getting it back to your best config, maybe stepping one item at a time, rebooting and continuing until you get a stable platform.

Jan 22, 2008 | Sony VGN-S150 MBX109 (M9_32 (A1072469A) PC...

3 Answers

NO Sound - 865PE Neo2-PFS Platinum Edition


You need to install the correct version of the sound drivers from the MSI website under your motherboard type. Third party or from Realtek sound drivers won't make you sound chip works. If after installing sound drivers from MSI website still don't work then your on board sound chip colud be defective.

Jun 29, 2007 | Abit AS8 Motherboard

1 Answer

TOTAL UPGRADE


>Can I upgrade the processor as well? Pentium 3 is compatible and what is the maximum MHz? Maximum CPU for GA-6BXE is Celeron-1400 (Tualatin core, with PowerLeap Adapter: http://www.powerleap.ca/Products/PL-370T.htm ...and patched bios by BIOS Patcher: http://forum.rom.by/topic5071.html&highlight=6BXE (last official BIOS don`t support Tualatin CPU-s) >A bigger HD will be compatible? With last F3a-version or patched bios - upto 128Gb. >The BIOS can aslo be upgraded? For max CPU / HDD - must be upgraded.

Sep 23, 2006 | Gigabyte Slot 1 GA-6BXE Motherboard

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