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How to retrieve my facebook password using md5 hash to convert into simple or plain password text? Please help me, thank you so much.

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I don't think decrypting software like md5 has is helpful to recover a lost online account password. If you haven't saved the password on your browser, you have to get it from the facebook, not from anywhere. You'll need to follow the "Forgot your password". Since you facebook password is stored on the online facebook server, not on your computer, there's no possibility even if you are using the best software to decrypt the encrypted password or other codes.

But if you have the password saved on your browser, I mean if you did accept the browser to save your password, then it's possible to get it without using any tools or software. Let me know if you need my help with the name of your internet browser, i.e. internet explorer, firefox, googlechrome,etc..etc..

Good luck.

Thanks for using FixYa.

Posted on Sep 02, 2010

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Why Does the TCP Connection Fail Even If the Server and Client Both Initiate a TCP Connection?


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Oct 08, 2016 | Computers & Internet

Tip

In most cases, the Internet is a safe place. However, there are places that...


In most cases, the Internet is a safe place. However, there are places that we need to be safer than others. We do everything from banking and online purchased on the web to more mundane things like gaming and Tweeting. All of these activities require a password. However, how we need to handle these password varies.

This tip is intended to make your life easier, yet more secure on the web. In Part I, we will discuss the concept of levels of security. Part II explains how passwords are stored on service providers. Part III introduces the concept of passwords and trade offs that you can make in deciding a password. Part IV is the conclusion.

Part I: Levels of Security
Think about how you treat your valuables. Do you treat all of your valuables the same? No. For example, if you have a cheap watch, you might leave it your locker at the gym without a lock. Suppose that you have a nice, expensive watch; you might put it in the locker with a lock. Suppose you have a gold Rolex; you might leave it at home. Finally, suppose you have a diamond-encrusted, solid-platinum Rolex. You might leave that at the bank.

So, you need to think about you, your identity, your valuable information, your reputation, and your bank account differently.

Of course, the safest thing to do is not to get on the Internet. However, that is unreasonable. So, instead have a plan for how you are on how you will use the different resources and how you will protect them.

I suggest the use of rings or grouping of trust. See Figure 1 for a possible relationship of resources you might use on the Internet.

Figure 1: Levels of Security
a2d857e.gif

Clearly, our bank is important to us. If a hacker broke into the bank, we would lose money. The same is true of our broker where our retirement fund might be held. These need high security.

Our mail and blog are also important to us. They represent our face to the world. If our blog password is stolen, our content may not represent us. If the mail is stolen, false information could be sent out. Intimate thoughts might be exposed. However, compared to our retirement accounts and bank account, these are less important but are used more frequently. So, we want a password that is easy to type and remember.

We all have accounts that we may never use again or not for several weeks. These passwords are important. However, if they are not protecting my credit card information. I'm not so worried if they get broken into.

Part II: Password Verification
If you ever use the same password, you need to be aware how your password is stored on a server. In most case password verification is the only mechanism a server uses in determining if you are who you say you are and if you are permitted to perform some action.

There are other methods of verification. For example, you have seen retina (eye) scans to see if you are person allowed into a particular room. There are finger print analyzers to determine if you can login to your laptop.

Since passwords are most commonly used, you need to be aware of the two ways that your password might be stored:
  1. plain text: the password is stored exactly like you typed it in
  2. hashed text: the password is converted into a form that is undecipherable
Plain text passwords are a bad idea. However, they are the most common. If you can request that your password be sent to you, it is stored in plain text. However, what if someone gets a hold of the database of plain text passwords? If you use that password on another machine, the robbers now have your password on other machines. Figure 2 shows the storage of the plain text password ("password") in the data base for later validation of the password. A user who enters "password" will be verified. A user who enters a wrong password, like "drowssap", will not be logged on.

Figure 2: Plain text passwords
b0ce123.gif

A hashed text password is a password that under goes a mathematical conversion. The conversion makes it impossible to decrypt the password. So, even if someone gets into the database, it is impossible to know what your real password is.

In Figure 3, the password is entered as "password" but the processor ('the light bulb') use a mathematical algorithm to convert it to "3vxeXW". This unusual value is all that is stored in the database.

Figure 3 Using Hashed Passwords

ef35cae.gif

So, how is your password verified when you login? Well, the password that you enter goes through the same mathematical conversion as your real password did. If the mathematical conversion of your typed password matches the converted (or hashed) password, you are allowed to logon. If the two converted passwords do not match, you are denied.

In Figure 3, notice that the stored value in the database is not "password" but the mathematical converted value. So, the only way to verify that the password entered by the user is to compare the mathematical converted value the user enters. So, note that of course "password" again becomes "3vxeXW". If the user enters a wrong value, the mathematical function will not return "3vxeXW" but some other value and the values will not match.

You don't have a choice as to whether the system will store a hashed version or a plain text version of your password. However, you can know for sure if they use plain text passwords if they return your password when you ask for a reminder, etc. You can be more comfortable if they offer to reset your password rather than to send it. While a reset password does not guarantee that your password is hashed, it is a good indicator that a hashed password is used.

Part III: Passwords
I have suggested three levels for my passwords: ones that must remain private, ones that should remain private, and ones that are not critical.

This leads us to think about how to make and maintain the password. Look at Figure 4,

Figure 4: Password Trade Offs
8bdf756.gif
When you think of passwords, consider these three factors:
  1. How complex is your password? Do you use upper and lower case? Do include numbers in your password? Do you include symbols?
  2. How often do you change your password? monthly, quarterly, yearly?
  3. Do you use different passwords? Every account is different? Some accounts are different? Every account is the same?
Many would argue that every account have a different password. While this is admirable, I would guess that I have over 200 accounts. For me to remember that many passwords, I would have to write them down or store them somewhere. Writing them down is clearly bad. Many people have a password locker which allows them to store all of them on the computer (or PDA) with a secure password. This is not a bad solution. However, it can be very inconvenient.

I argue that it is sufficient to have a set of passwords based at the level of security required. So, yes, I might have a different bank and different brokerage password. However, my blog and email password might be the same. When it comes to little sites, I might have only a handful of passwords that I use. In total, I might have as few as ten passwords for my 200 accounts at any given time.

Part IV: Conclusion
If you read this whole article, you know why you should make your passwords in a particular way. However, even if you did not read the article I would like to make the following summary observation and suggestions.

  1. If you want to be the most secure, every website should have a different password. However, this can be very confusing. Use a password locker on your PC or PDA to keep all of the passwords.
  2. If you do share passwords between sites, make sure that you share them with like levels of consequence of a security breach. Don't use the same password for your bank account as for your knitting club. Always decide the cost of a security breach at each site. The higher the cost of a breach the better the password should be, the more frequently the password should be changed, and the fewer sites that should share the password.
  3. Some sites use plain text passwords which means that anyone who has access to the website internals has your password. If you use the same password at the knitting site and your bank, those that have access to the internals of the knitting site can use your password at the bank. While the people at the knitting club may not try to get into your bank account, you should not assume that someone who breaks into the knitting site will not try to break into your account.
  4. It is always good to change your password regularly. However, this can be confusing. Change the high security passwords more often than sites which do not require as much security.
About the author:
Jack Briner has a Ph.D. in Computer Science from Duke University. He has taught courses in networking, network security, PC repair, A+ certification, web design and others. He is the founder of Flowertown Technology, LLC and its PC repair division, FixYaPC.com.

on May 19, 2010 | Computers & Internet

Tip

Security and the Internet


In most cases, the Internet is a safe place. However, there are places that we need to be safer than others. We do everything from banking and online purchased on the web to more mundane things like gaming and Tweeting. All of these activities require a password. However, how we need to handle these password varies.

This tip is intended to make your life easier, yet more secure on the web. In Part I, we will discuss the concept of levels of security. Part II explains how passwords are stored on service providers. Part III introduces the concept of passwords and trade offs that you can make in deciding a password. Part IV is the conclusion.

Part I: Levels of Security
Think about how you treat your valuables. Do you treat all of your valuables the same? No. For example, if you have a cheap watch, you might leave it your locker at the gym without a lock. Suppose that you have a nice, expensive watch; you might put it in the locker with a lock. Suppose you have a gold Rolex; you might leave it at home. Finally, suppose you have a diamond-encrusted, solid-platinum Rolex. You might leave that at the bank.

So, you need to think about you, your identity, your valuable information, your reputation, and your bank account differently.

Of course, the safest thing to do is not to get on the Internet. However, that is unreasonable. So, instead have a plan for how you are on how you will use the different resources and how you will protect them.

I suggest the use of rings or grouping of trust. See Figure 1 for a possible relationship of resources you might use on the Internet.

Figure 1: Levels of Security
a2d857e.gif

Clearly, our bank is important to us. If a hacker broke into the bank, we would lose money. The same is true of our broker where our retirement fund might be held. These need high security.

Our mail and blog are also important to us. They represent our face to the world. If our blog password is stolen, our content may not represent us. If the mail is stolen, false information could be sent out. Intimate thoughts might be exposed. However, compared to our retirement accounts and bank account, these are less important but are used more frequently. So, we want a password that is easy to type and remember.

We all have accounts that we may never use again or not for several weeks. These passwords are important. However, if they are not protecting my credit card information. I'm not so worried if they get broken into.

Part II: Password Verification
If you ever use the same password, you need to be aware how your password is stored on a server. In most case password verification is the only mechanism a server uses in determining if you are who you say you are and if you are permitted to perform some action.

There are other methods of verification. For example, you have seen retina (eye) scans to see if you are person allowed into a particular room. There are finger print analyzers to determine if you can login to your laptop.

Since passwords are most commonly used, you need to be aware of the two ways that your password might be stored:
  1. plain text: the password is stored exactly like you typed it in
  2. hashed text: the password is converted into a form that is undecipherable
Plain text passwords are a bad idea. However, they are the most common. If you can request that your password be sent to you, it is stored in plain text. However, what if someone gets a hold of the database of plain text passwords? If you use that password on another machine, the robbers now have your password on other machines. Figure 2 shows the storage of the plain text password ("password") in the data base for later validation of the password. A user who enters "password" will be verified. A user who enters a wrong password, like "drowssap", will not be logged on.

Figure 2: Plain text passwords
b0ce123.gif

A hashed text password is a password that under goes a mathematical conversion. The conversion makes it impossible to decrypt the password. So, even if someone gets into the database, it is impossible to know what your real password is.

In Figure 3, the password is entered as "password" but the processor ('the light bulb') use a mathematical algorithm to convert it to "3vxeXW". This unusual value is all that is stored in the database.

Figure 3 Using Hashed Passwords

ef35cae.gif

So, how is your password verified when you login? Well, the password that you enter goes through the same mathematical conversion as your real password did. If the mathematical conversion of your typed password matches the converted (or hashed) password, you are allowed to logon. If the two converted passwords do not match, you are denied.

In Figure 3, notice that the stored value in the database is not "password" but the mathematical converted value. So, the only way to verify that the password entered by the user is to compare the mathematical converted value the user enters. So, note that of course "password" again becomes "3vxeXW". If the user enters a wrong value, the mathematical function will not return "3vxeXW" but some other value and the values will not match.

You don't have a choice as to whether the system will store a hashed version or a plain text version of your password. However, you can know for sure if they use plain text passwords if they return your password when you ask for a reminder, etc. You can be more comfortable if they offer to reset your password rather than to send it. While a reset password does not guarantee that your password is hashed, it is a good indicator that a hashed password is used.

Part III: Passwords
I have suggested three levels for my passwords: ones that must remain private, ones that should remain private, and ones that are not critical.

This leads us to think about how to make and maintain the password. Look at Figure 4,

Figure 4: Password Trade Offs
8bdf756.gif
When you think of passwords, consider these three factors:
  1. How complex is your password? Do you use upper and lower case? Do include numbers in your password? Do you include symbols?
  2. How often do you change your password? monthly, quarterly, yearly?
  3. Do you use different passwords? Every account is different? Some accounts are different? Every account is the same?
Many would argue that every account have a different password. While this is admirable, I would guess that I have over 200 accounts. For me to remember that many passwords, I would have to write them down or store them somewhere. Writing them down is clearly bad. Many people have a password locker which allows them to store all of them on the computer (or PDA) with a secure password. This is not a bad solution. However, it can be very inconvenient.

I argue that it is sufficient to have a set of passwords based at the level of security required. So, yes, I might have a different bank and different brokerage password. However, my blog and email password might be the same. When it comes to little sites, I might have only a handful of passwords that I use. In total, I might have as few as ten passwords for my 200 accounts at any given time.

Part IV: Conclusion
If you read this whole article, you know why you should make your passwords in a particular way. However, even if you did not read the article I would like to make the following summary observation and suggestions.

  1. If you want to be the most secure, every website should have a different password. However, this can be very confusing. Use a password locker on your PC or PDA to keep all of the passwords.
  2. If you do share passwords between sites, make sure that you share them with like levels of consequence of a security breach. Don't use the same password for your bank account as for your knitting club. Always decide the cost of a security breach at each site. The higher the cost of a breach the better the password should be, the more frequently the password should be changed, and the fewer sites that should share the password.
  3. Some sites use plain text passwords which means that anyone who has access to the website internals has your password. If you use the same password at the knitting site and your bank, those that have access to the internals of the knitting site can use your password at the bank. While the people at the knitting club may not try to get into your bank account, you should not assume that someone who breaks into the knitting site will not try to break into your account.
  4. It is always good to change your password regularly. However, this can be confusing. Change the high security passwords more often than sites which do not require as much security.
About the author:
Jack Briner has a Ph.D. in Computer Science from Duke University. He has taught courses in networking, network security, PC repair, A+ certification, web design and others. He is the founder of Flowertown Technology, LLC and its PC repair division, FixYaPC.com.

on May 19, 2010 | Computers & Internet

6 Answers

Help me with Facebook password hacker v2.9.8


Hello. I'm living in Iran. Unit of Rails is our money. I can not activate cod buy from you. I do not have anyone outside of Iran. Please help me .. It is very important to me. I want the code ... Well I can not speak English. Please help me and my Khvash fast. Please ......
My email: miladjanbaz50@yahoo.com
Facebook is my address: https://www.facebook.com/milad.janbaz.526
Please tell me .. Give pm to Facebook

Aug 21, 2013 | Computers & Internet

4 Answers

A good facebook hacking software


*********** testing of your website sceurity audit(s) DATABASE RETRIEVAL, HACKING OF WEBSITES & Hacking Accounts which include FACEBOOK,TWITTER this is pretty easy,MYSPACE,SKYPE, OVO .and email accounts such YAHOO,AOL ,HOTMAIL ,GMX,GMAIL AND OTHER EMAIL SERVICES BOTH PRIVATE AND GENERAL i send you a SCREENSHOT.I require either a Name, Friend ID, or E-mail address of the targets account(s)i can also get into BLACKBERRY AND APPLE SMARTPHONES AND OTHER SMART PHONES AND GET VALUABLE DATA. I ALSO SELL SMTP ,LEADS ,PHONE VERIFIED ACCOUNTS (CRAIGLIST,FACEBOOK,EMAILS,) ICAN POST ON CRIAGLIST) I ALSO SELL PAYPALL ACCOUNT, WESTERN UNION PAYOUT INFORMATION I have the help of a current 0-Day Exploit that allows me to gain remote access to the website servers and from there I find the password which is usually in an MD5 hash, from that I must decrypt to get the real password. The entire process takes about 10 minutes-15 hourS to complete. All passwords are tested out 3 times before they get issued to any clients.I also rip Standards from websites.I accept payment through LR (Liberty Reserve) Only.I hardly ever USE WESTERN UNION!

Apr 20, 2012 | Community Hacker

Tip

Hacking Terminology-Guide for Complete Noobs


Bot - A bot is a program that is ran secretly in the background of a customer’s computer. The bot connects to an IRC channel usually where a Bot Herder(its creator) can use a number of commands to control these computers that are now it’s under control. A zombie computer(a pc under control of a bot herder) can be manipulated in a number of ways. Some functions of a bot include stealing customers passwords, Password Recovery Tool, ddosing a server to cause it to crash, turning on the webcam and being able to watch the zombie computer’s users, visiting a website(to gain money + traffic for a bot herder), clicking ads, making ads appear randomly, destroying itself(the pc), and sending spam to email contacts.

serverNET – A bunch of bot’s connected to a server (usually IRC or web) that can be controlled and manipulated by its owner.

RAT (Remote Administration Tool) – Sort of like a serverNET in regards that you can gain acess to the customers computer and do stuff like look at their files, webcam, etc. Only this malware connects back to you, apposed to aserver.

Crypter – A crypter is used to make well known hacker’s viruses (such as keyloggers and botnets) undetectable by anti-virus software by changing the virus program signatures that anti virus programs have in their databases to make them easier to spread.

Binder – A binder is used to bind a virus(such as a Password Recovery Tool,etc) to another program making it undetechtable and able to fool users into thinking its something else. (IE a customer will click an installPhotoshop.exe and it will install photoshop as well as your virus secretly.)
FUD – Term for fully undetectable virus. (made by either coding your own virus or by crypting and binding an existing virus) Use http://novirusthanks.com (uncheck distribute sample) to check if your virus is undetectable.
Database – Used by most websites to store things such as User names, Passwords, Email, etc of an entire website or community.

SQL Injection
– A way of manipulating a website’s forms as a way of retrieving it’s databases. This can be used to find users and passwords as well as obtaining admin on a website in order to deface it.
XSS (Cross Site Scripting) – a type of computer security vulnerability typically found in web applications which allow code injection by malicious web users into the web pages viewed by other users. An exploited cross-site scripting vulnerability can be used by attackers to bypass access controls such as the same origin policy. Vulnerabilities of this kind have been exploited to craft powerful phishing attacks and browser exploits.

Password Recovery Tool – A Password Recovery Tool is a program, usualy ran secretly in the background that records what users type, then the typed output is usually sent via email or uploaded by thePassword Recovery Tool somewhere to the web in secret. These can be attached to other executables so you never even know you ran them in the first place, once you click it once it often is started at startup from their on.

Cookie Stealing/Spoofing – Used to fool a customer into clicking a link that will steal their cookies to websites which you can then use to have their privileges to various parts of a website or forum.
BruteForcer – Program used to crack passwords by trying every password/password list on various forms.

Hashes - How passwords are usually stored, this is a way of crypting a password so it is not plain text, harder passwords are very hard to crack but simple ones have often been cracked and can be found on online databases. Some common password hashes include MD5 and SHA.

Social Engineering – Tricking a customer into doing something you want them to do by disguising or enticing them into doing what you want.

Phishing - Creating a fake login page to a well known website (IE Facebook) and then fooling a customer into entering their information on the fake login page through social engineering.

on Jan 15, 2010 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Help my pls i will the MD5 hash keyy


Hi M5 hash keys are 126bits long , they represent a value which as been encrypted by the MD5 hash algorithm. They can't be reversed just by looking at the hash value, the only way to find out what the value of the hash is, is by using md5 hash tools which go though very combination of symbols,letters and numbers to find the same hash also know as a brute force attack. MD5 hashes can also be used on files such as images, if the images is changed by a single bit a new md5 hash is created and therefore you are aware of a chnage to an image.

What i have typed above is just the basic of it.
Example

MD5 hash for = alan is 3a451c30f2d29bd3fb3229e66ae45c9f

to find out the value alan from the MD5 hash , the hash tool will search though all combinations until that md5 hash is the same once found the tool will now it represents alan. the md5 hash for all will always be the same has above.

if you change it to Alan it will be 08dcf80f988e0f038a9582b9563dff17
as you can see a simple letter change changes the entire MD5 hash value.

May 09, 2011 | Computers & Internet

2 Answers

I cant remember my password and its the same as my hotmail address password


To reset your Facebook password, please click "Lost password?" - it's located right below the text field where you usually fill in your password. Facebook will then offer you several methods for reclaiming your account.

Mar 13, 2011 | Facebook Social Network

1 Answer

How do i retrieve my face book pass word


Use this form (click here to open) to reset your password. Open the link, enter the "captcha" shown in the "Text box" and type in your email address (or you can use your mobile number if it's already been activated with facebook), press enter and you'll be asked if you are sure to reset your password, click "Reset my password" and then check your email while the windows still opened. You must have received an email with the "confirmation reset code" with the subject line "Facebook Password Reset Confirmation", copy the code (something like this "42973a5d", both with texts and numbers) and paste it into the "confirmation reset code" box, press "'Submit". Done, you will be presented another page with another text boxes to enter your new password.

Good luck.

Thanks for using FixYa.

Aug 08, 2010 | Facebook Social Network

1 Answer

I moderate a site and can't remember my password. HELP!


If you have access to the database - go to users and change the password

If the password is plain text then fine - if not you need to count how many chars are there

30ish Chars = MD5
40ish Chars = Sha1

Go to an online MD5 / Sha1 site and enter your password in normal text - copy the result from the site into the users table and hey presto your back in business!

Sep 30, 2009 | Microsoft Internet Explorer 7

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