Question about Bushnell 3" Reflector Telescope w/Talking Guideand Tripod

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Setting up scope

It says in the instructions to look for a black arrow below the azimuth mount. All I see is the white arrow for the degrees. I am having problems alighning the telescope. Howw should I do it?

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If background is black arrow must be white.No problem.Go to sky whatching.

Posted on Jul 12, 2011

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I don't know how to use your telescope Please help me


We will need much more information-- what type of scope do you own? A refractor? a reflector?

And is it mounted on an altitude azimuth mount or an EQ - equatorial mount?

Aug 01, 2011 | Telescopes

Tip

You Just Bought an EQUATORIAL Telescope Mount!


Even though we warned you not to do this, you bought one anyway! Beginners should never buy an EQ telescope mount as their first telescope. It's too late now; so I guess we will need to teach you how to use it!

Equatorial mounts move in a way that seems not to very intuitive. Unlike the easy Alt AZ mount which moves up and down and left and right, the EQ mounted telescope seems to move in TWO dissimilar directions at the same time.

Additionally you must first polar align the mount on the North star Polaris before you can use it. SEE! we told you not to buy it!

Here are the steps to roughly polar align the telescope so you can use it. If it is motorized the single Right Ascension motor will keep the sky object inside the eyepiece for long periods of time. If you do not have a Right Ascension motor, the slow motion RA knob can be slowly turned to keep the sky object centered in the eyepiece.

Begin by leveling the mount and tripod. Move the entire mount and tripod so it is pointing roughly to North, as close as possible using the steps below or a compass. Don't forget to adjust for your magnetic deviation. My location's compass reading is about 5 degrees away from true North. This is called magnetic deviation. You can find your location's deviation on the internet. Then proceed with the steps below.

First, adjust the Declination to the latitude for your observing site. Declination is the angle that the scope is pointing UP, and it's the same as your latitude. For example Dallas, Texas is about 32 degrees North latitude, adjust the scope so the small indicator reads 32 degrees. By the way, the North star in Dallas, TX is about 32 degrees above the horizon. Your latitude matches the elevation of Polaris (the North star) above the horizon.

Second, either look through the polar alignment scope buried in the axis of the telescope mount, or look along side the axis, and get the star Polaris lined up in the cross-hair of the polar alignment scope, or as best you can by looking along the side of the mount axis, or lining it up using your compass.. This will put the scope to within about 3/4 of 1 degree of the TRUE North celestial sphere. This is good enough for VISUAL observation, but NOT good enough to do astro-photography..

Adjust the DECLINATION up or down, and move the entire mount left or right until you can see Polaris as indicated above, or it is lined up as close as possible.

Now you are roughly polar aligned. Now you can move the tube around by loosening the Right Ascension lock, and or the Declination lock until your sky object appears in the small finder scope mounted on top of the main telescope tube.(DO NOT MOVE THE MOUNT, and the counter weight should never be higher than the telescope tube) Lock down the scope in both axis and use the fine adjustment RA and DEC knobs to center the target. Again, DO NOT move the mount or tripod. The mount should still be pointing at Polaris.

This web site illustrates this procedure:
http://www.astronomy.net/articles/4/polaralign.html

also this web site

http://www.telescopes.com/telescopes/polaralignmentarticle.cfm

You should be able to keep an object within the field of view of the eyepiece by slowing turning the Right Ascension slow motion control knob-------- IF you are actually accurately polar aligned. Small adjustments may also be needed with the DEC slow motion knob since you are not exactly polar aligned using this rough alignment technique.

However it can be used successfully for visual observation. Your scope will now track the motion of the stars as they move across the sky.

Hope that helps you!

Clear Skies!
TelescopeMan

www.telescopeman.tumblr.com

on Dec 29, 2009 | Telescopes

1 Answer

I inherited a blue Skywatcher telescope about 4 years ago without instructions . it has D = 70mm and F = 900 mm printed on the side . it came with two eye peices and extender and a 45 Degree 'erecting...


Any manual for a 70mm (refractor?) style telescope will show you how to set this up. You never said what type of mount the scope is on-- Altitude-Azimuth, up down left right--- or an equatorial mount??

Anyway Meade has manuals for all of their telescopes available for free download. Go to the Meade site listed below and look under the REFRACTOR heading (or the 4.5 inch REFLECTOR) heading for one that is similar to your scope. They are all assembled and used in a similar fashion.

http://www.meade.com/manuals/index.html

and look at my TIPS on my profile page-- and read this web site-- to learn about the types of telescopes and mounts:

http://texasastro.org/telescope.php

http://texasastro.org/mounts.php

Jun 04, 2011 | Telescopes

1 Answer

Hi I have a meade ETX 105 pe I can get the scope to move Alt motion with the controller but it wont move in the Azimuth position with the controller. Might I be doing something wrong


This can be caused by 4 things-

A stuck button on the hand controller.

A bad hand controller cable

A burned out circuit board inside

A burned out Azimuth motor

(Long shot) bad firmware in the hand controller. DO a Reset and reload the firmware.

Try to borrow another hand controller and buy a new cable. If these two do not fix it then it's a mechanical problem or a circuit board problem inside the scope.

Meade can repair this but you will need to send them the scope:
http://www.meade.com/support/index.html

Mar 26, 2011 | Meade ETX-105AT (420 x 105mm) Telescope

1 Answer

Hi, Bought a used telescope with a GT mount. The polar adjustment will not go below 46 degrees without binding. The binding screw only turns 1/4 turn in each direction and appears to be binding the...


This scope does NOT need to be polar aligned --

Here is the manual:
http://www.celestron.com/c3/images/files/downloads/1228334587_nexstargt.pdf

This is an ALT AZ goto scope. Read the manual above. You use the hand controller to move the scope in Altitude and Azimuth(left-right).

You must align it on 2 stars in order for it to has successful gotos.

Read the manual above.

Aug 21, 2010 | Celestron NexStar 114GT (269 x 114mm)...

1 Answer

Celestron 114EQ polar setting and Equatorial settings


The ALTITUDE adjustment matches your LATITUDE. I live at 32.5 degrees North latitude. So the scope is first adjusted to 32.5 degrees UP.

Then the Right Ascension is point to Polaris the North star by MOVING the entire scope and mount.

Read my Equatorial mount TIP on my profile page, and read this web site.

http://www.astro-tom.com/tips_and_advice/precision_polar_alignment.htm#Rough%20Polar%20Alignment

May 05, 2010 | Celestron PowerSeeker 114 EQ Telescope

1 Answer

The azimuth adjustment keys don't work


Send it back along with the hand controller describing the problem. Could be several things including a bad hand controller. If there is a local astronomy shop nearby take the scope there and ask to try one of the hand controllers in the shop and test it. If it now works you just need to buy another hand controller.

Otherwise send it in for repair

Jul 01, 2009 | Celestron NexStar 5 SE (300 x 44.45mm)...

1 Answer

The Azimuth Dial isn't firmly attached cause altitude cannot be fixed to an angle


Most of the small telescopes setting circles really cannot be used to find anything--- just not accurate enough---

Try using a star chart -- and star hopping --- to what you want to see.

A free monthly star chart is available at :
www.skymaps.com

Jan 03, 2009 | Bushnell Voyager 78-9945 Telescope

2 Answers

Instruction manual for 1970's custom .22 scope with BDC


Hold the outer portion of the elevation knob and unscrew the screw on top. then pull up on the outer portion and you'll see a silver screw marked with an arrow and the word "Up". Sight the rifle at a known distance and then line up the knob with that distance as you push it down on the scope and replace the screw. I have one of these and figured this out on my own, however I'm missing the mount and would like some pictures and dimensions of the mount if any of you can get some. I'm gonna be machining a new one and would like to keep it as close to the original as possible.

Sep 08, 2008 | Telescopes

1 Answer

Celestron nexstar 11" gps scope


Be sure that the Azimuth Axis is Lock, you migth want to try and move the telescope in the Azimuth to make sure it is it is locked. Be carful not to force it. I have seen on some post where the locking part of the Azimuth somtimes breaks. and the Azimuth Axis will just spin freely Locked down or not.

May 19, 2008 | Celestron NexStar 11 GPS (660 x 279mm)...

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