Question about Digital Cameras

1 Answer

Image Properties shown....

1. What is Exposure Bias?
2. What is the actual distance between the subject with a property of 9.11 focal length?
3. What is the actual distance between the subject with a property of 4.6
focal length?
4. What is the Digital Zoom Ratio? i.e. 3072/3072
5. Is there anyway that a person who's Image Properties is 4.6 take their own picture and have the picture come out with good clarity, no movement showing, centered.
6. can they take 3 good pictures within 1 minute by using the timer?

Posted by on

1 Answer

  • Level 2:

    An expert who has achieved level 2 by getting 100 points

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    Scholar:

    An expert who has written 20 answers of more than 400 characters.

    Hot-Shot:

    An expert who has answered 20 questions.

  • Expert
  • 173 Answers

1: bias means voltage a neg or plus I assume the plus means more exposure.
2: focal length in feet ..if not using auto-focus
3: 4.6 feet
4: digital zoom is something I would never mess with but 3072/3072 sounds like a 3 megapixal square.
5: yes set the exposure to a fast shutter or bias in your case like - 3
6: why sure and quite a few pics in 1 minute with the right camera.

Posted on May 10, 2008

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

I couldn't seem to blur my portrait backgrounds with the canon powershot a1200. can you help me with step by step instructions? does the a1200 have an AV mode at all? thanks


You're trying for what's called a narrow depth-of-field (DoF).

DoF is controlled by three factors: the aperture of the lens, distance to the subject, and the focal length of the lens. This has nothing to do with any particular design, it's simply physics.

The wider the aperture (smaller the f/number), the narrower the DoF. The A1200 does not have an Av mode which would let you control the aperture directly. However, it does have a Portrait mode, which is supposed to give you a wider aperture.

The closer you are to the subject, the narrower the DoF. This suggests that you get as close to the subject as practicable. However, in general you don't want to get too close for portraits as this tends to exaggerate certain facial features, like making noses look bigger.

The longer the focal length of the lens, the narrower the DoF. This suggests that you back away and zoom in. Yes, this conflicts with the previous paragraph.

Unfortunately, it's the actual focal length of the lens that matters here, not the "35mm equivalent" often quoted in the spces. The lens on the A1200 zooms from 5mm to 20mm. Landscape photographers like to use 24mm lenses on their 35mm cameras because that gives them practically infinite depth-of-field, from the flower in the foreground to the mountains in the background. The lens on your camera is shorter than that, so you're going to have a hard time blurring portrait backgrounds.

The best I can recommend is to put the camera into Portrait mode, put as much distance as possible between the subject and the background, get as close to the subject as possible, and zoom in to the longest focal length you have (remembering that the last two are in conflict).

Jun 14, 2011 | Canon A1200 Digital Camera

Tip

Controlling Depth of Field


A photographed object will only appear sharp in an area a specific distance from the camera. The human eye and brain still accept some areas of the image as acceptably sharp if they lie near the plane of focus and already show a small degree of blur. This zone, which is still in acceptably sharp focus, is called depth of field.

You'd typically want a wide depth of field when shooting landscapes, so as to have everything from the flower in the foreground to the mountains on the horizon in focus. You'd typically want a narrow depth of field for such subjects as portraits and flowers, blurring the background to avoid distractions.

How large this depth of field is depends on the distance to the subject, the aperture, and the focal length of the lens. Whether you're shooting film or digital makes no difference.

If the plane of focus lies further away from the camera, the depth of field is wider than if the camera focuses on an object close by.

Small apertures (large f/numbers) result in a wider depth of field.

Short focal length lenses (wide angle) have a wider depth of field than long focal length lenses (telephoto).

The depth of field is determined by the actual focal length of the lens, not the "35-mm equivalent" often used in the camera specifications. Because most compact cameras have sensors much smaller than SLRs, they have much shorter lenses, giving wider depth of field. This is great for landscapes, not so great for portraits.

To get a narrow depth of field, set the aperture as large as you can (smaller f/numbers), move in close to the subject, and zoom in. If your camera doesn't give you direct control over the aperture, try using the Portrait mode. And yes, the last two items above, moving in close and zooming in, are in opposition, You'll have to decide on the best balance for your picture.

To get a wide depth of field, set the aperture as small as you can (larger f/numbers), move away from the subject, and zoom out. If your camera doesn't give you direct control over the aperture, try using the Landscape mode.

Before going on vacation or shooting your child's wedding, experiment with these factors. Shoot things in your backyard or at a park, trying for both narrow and deep depth of field, then look at the pictures on your computer.

on Jun 23, 2011 | Digital Cameras

1 Answer

What shooting mode do i need to shoot a subject clear but the background blurred


If you're using the point&shoot modes, use the Portrait mode. For more control you're going to want the PSAM modes.

What you want is a narrow depth of field. Depth of field is controlled by three factors. The first is the lens aperture: the wider the aperture (smaller f/numbers) the narrower the DoF. The second is the lens focal length: the longer the lens the narrower the DoF. The third is the camera-to-subject distance: the nearer you are to the subject the narrower the DoF.

The easiest way to control the aperture is to use the A mode. This lets you set the aperture and the camera will automatically set the appropriate shutter speed to give the proper exposure.

You can zoom in farther and move in closer (yes, the two are in conflict, you'll have to determine the proper position and focal length for the picture you want).

Feb 14, 2011 | Nikon D40x Digital Camera

1 Answer

How do you take a pic with the Nikon d60 where the background is blurred?


You're trying for what's called a narrow depth of field. DoF is controlled by three factors: distance from camera to subject, lens focal length, and lens aperture. The closer the camera is to the subject, the narrower the DoF. The longer the lens focal length, the narrower the DoF. The larger the lens aperture, the narrower the DoF.

Get as close to the subject as practical, and use as long a focal length as practical. I realize these two aims conflict with each other. For portraits, you want a focal length in the 50-90mm range and move in to fill the frame.

You want to shoot with as wide an aperture as you can. Unfortunately most lenses are not at their sharpest wide open. Also, the 18-55mm lens doesn't open up all that wide, f/3.5 at 18mm and f/5.6 at 55mm. To get the widest aperture, you can shoot in the P or A modes. If you don't want to leave the point&shoot modes, try using the Portrait mode.

Since you're not paying for film, I suggest you experiment with the different settings and shooting setups, moving closer and farther from the subject, using different focal lengths, and using different apertures, and see what results you get.

Nov 22, 2010 | Nikon D60 Digital Camera with 18-55mm lens

1 Answer

I want to take a picture that is focused on the subject, while everything else in the picture is blurry


What you want is a limited depth of field. There are three factors that control the depth of field: subject distance, lens focal length, and lens aperture. The greater the distance, the wider the DoF. The shorter the lens, the greater the DoF. The smaller the aperture, the greater the DoF.

One problem with compact cameras is that they have very small sensors. This means that they have short lenses. And short lenses mean they have wide depth of field. This is often an advantage, in that more of the scene is in focus. Unfortunately, this works against you when you don't want a wide DoF.

At the short end, the S2's lens focal length is 6mm. This will put just about everything in focus. Even at the other end, the focal length is 72mm. With a 35mm film camera, most portrait photographers use lenses at least 85mm in focal length in an attempt to minimize DoF to draw attention to the face and blur the background.

Unfortunately, the best you'll be able to do is to set the camera to the portrait mode, get as close to the subject as possible, and zoom in as much as possible. I realize the last two conflict with each other, you'll just have to find the proper balance for whatever you're photographing.

Nov 18, 2010 | Canon PowerShot S2 IS Digital Camera

1 Answer

How to blur the background in picture taking?


Get another camera :-(

You want to reduce the depth-of-field so that the subject is in focus while the foreground and background are out of focus and blurred. Depth of field (DoF) is dependent on three factors: distance, lens aperture, and lens focal length.

The farther the subject, the deeper the DoF. If you take a picture of a distant mountain peak, the mountain behind that and sunlit the clouds on the horizon will also be in focus. If you get close enough to a flower, you might get the front petals in focus while the petals in the back might blur.

The smaller the lens aperture, the deeper the DoF. Landscape mode, for example, will try to use a smaller aperture in order to get everything in focus while portrait mode will try to use a larger aperture in order to blur the background.

The shorter the lens focal length, the deeper the DoF. This is the killer. Due to the small size of the image sensor, the EX-Z750 has a very short lens: 7.9mm to 23.7mm. Even at the telephoto end of the range, 23.7mm would be considered very wide by film photograpers. A 24mm lens would give film photographers a sharp shot from foreground to horizon and, unfortunately, you're seeing that as well.

Note that the DoF is dependent on the actual focal length, not the 35mm equivalent you may have read about. This is a law of physics, not something that lens designers can easily alter.

Mar 04, 2010 | Casio Exilim EX-Z750 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Image Properties shown....You've been great!!!! Few more....


1: it just adds and copies existing pixels with the digi zoom. I never fooled with it for you can just take the image with a paint program and blow it up as big as you want.. with decreasing detail.just start with a nice high megapixel like 5M camera but you'll need a bigger memory card.

2: exposure bias at 0.0 is what the camera sets as standard. adjusting this in the "M" mode allows more exposure "+" or less "-". making the aperture bigger or smaller to allow more light or less at higher shutter speeds or low speeds. 1/100 is good.
3: yes but try it out and put it on automatic first.
4: focal length or f stop I'm confused. The aperture setting is known as the f-stop. The lowest number f-stop lets the most amount of light reach the image sensor. A high f-stop increases the depth of the field.witch is focal length. so I think I was wrong in the "feet" meaning f/2.8 for portrait or up close f'/16 for front and background or landscape. also set your ISO around 80 - 120 for the best exposures or pictures.

May 10, 2008 | Digital Cameras

1 Answer

Focus


What is the focal length of your lens?

In order to work with depth-of-field, two things are essentially contributors to fully focused image without depth, 1) it depends on your lens focal length 18-70mm or 70-200mm, 2) your f-stop. 2.8 (large iris) or 30 (small iris).

Simply put, a smaller iris (>15 fstop) increases the DOF, or makes things in front-of and behind the subject more visible/clear. Larger iris (<15 ftop) reduces the DOF, or makes things in front-of and behind the subject less focused/recognizable.

There's quite a lot that goes in to DOF, so check out the link above for the details.

Nov 13, 2007 | Nikon D50 Digital Camera with 18-55mm Lens

1 Answer

What is the distance at Macro mode?


In wide-angle macro mode, the minimum focus range is as close as 30cm from CCD (21cm from the lens front.) At this point, the magnification is 0.03x (equivalent to 0.12x in 35mm format).(Focal length is 7.2mm. At maximum magnification 283mm x 213mm of the subject can be captured.) In telephoto macro mode, the minimum focus range is 25cm from CCD (13 cm from the lens front) and the magnification is 0.18x (equivalent to 0.7x in 35mm format). (Focal length is 42.7mm to 50.8mm. At maximum magnification 52mm x 39mm of the subject can be captured.)

Sep 15, 2005 | Konica Minolta DiMAGE A200 Digital Camera

1 Answer

What is the distance at Macro mode?


In wide-angle macro mode, the minimum focus range is as close as 30cm from CCD(21cm from the lens front.) At this point, the magnification is 0.03x (equivalent to 0.12x in 35mm format). (Focal length is7.2mm. At maximum magnification 283mmx213mm of the subject can be captured.) In telephoto macro mode, the minimum focus range is 25cm from CCD(13cm from the lens front )and the magnification is 0.177x (equivalent to 0.7x in 35mm format). (Focal length is42.7mm to 50.8mm. At maximum magnification 50mmx37mm of the subject can be captured.)

Sep 15, 2005 | Konica Minolta DiMAGE A1 Digital Camera

Not finding what you are looking for?
Digital Cameras Logo

Related Topics:

55 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Digital Cameras Experts

kakima

Level 3 Expert

96627 Answers

Donald DCruz
Donald DCruz

Level 3 Expert

17129 Answers

Steve

Level 3 Expert

3287 Answers

Are you a Digital Camera Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...