Question about Skagen Watches

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The little metal ring inside the watch face has come out and is preventing the watch hands from turning

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It would be best if you didn't trying repairing this yourself. Take it to a trusted Jeweler in your town, or find a Skagen Authorized Dealer to send it to. Thanks.

Posted on Sep 01, 2010

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Minute hand on Braun AB1A has curved up stopping second hand


The whole front square face of the clock has 4 little nails which are located in the middle of each side (inside and next to the edge of the joint), so you have to carefully insert a screwdriver and lever the front out. After this you have to remove the hands (remember to set the clock and alarm hand to 12:00 before taking those away). The face will be loose, and you'll have access to the mechanism. Clean the alarm contact (look for a double silver metal arm that touches an small bronze stick. Alarm button can be release by gently lever the little nail that shows in the center when button is up at clock's backside.
Cheers from Argentina

Jul 04, 2012 | Braun Ab1a Alarm Clock - Black By Rams &...

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Watch glossary: D


DEPTH ALARM
An alarm on a divers' watch that sounds when the wearer exceeds a pre-set depth.
DEPTH METER or DEPTH SENSOR
A device on a divers' watch that determines the wearer's depth by measuring water pressure. It shows the depth either by analog hands and a scale on the watch face or through a digital display.
DECK WATCH
A large-sized ship's chronometer.
DEVIATION
A progressive natural change of a watch's rate with respect to objective time. In case of a watch's faster rate, the deviation is defined positive, in the opposite case negative.
DIAL
Face of a watch, on which time and further functions are displayed by markers, hands, discs or through windows. Normally it is made of a brass - sometimes silver or gold.
DIGITAL WATCH
Said of watches whose indications are displayed mostly inside an aperture or window on the dial.
DIVERS' WATCH
A watch that is water resistant to 200M. Has a unidirectional rotating bezel and a screw-on crown and back. Has a metal or rubber strap (not leather). May have a sapphire crystal and possibly, a wet-suit extension.

on Jan 11, 2010 | Watches

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Watch glossary: B


BAGUETTE
Ladies style watch with a thin, elongated face; usually rectangular in shape but may be oval.
BALANCE
Oscillating device that, together with the balance spring, makes up the movement's heart in as much as its oscillations determine the frequency of its functioning and precision.
BALANCE SPRING
Component of the regulating unit that, together with the balance, determines the movement's precision. The material used is mostly a steel alloy (e.g. Nivarox, s.), an extremely stable metal compound. In order to prevent the system's center of gravity from continuous shifts, hence differences in rate due to the watch's position, some modifications were adopted. These modifications included Breguet's overcoil (closing the terminal part of the spring partly on itself, so as to assure an almost perfect centering) and Philips curve (helping to eliminate the lateral pressure of the balance-staff pivots against their bearings). Today, thanks to the quality of materials, it is possible to assure an excellent precision of movement working even with a flat spring.
BARREL
Component of the movement containing the mainspring, whose toothed rim meshes with the pinion of the first gear of the train. Due to the fact that the whole movement - made up of barrel and mainspring - transmits the motive force, it is also considered to be the very motor. Inside the barrel, the mainspring is wound around an arbor turned by the winding crown or, in the case of automatic movements, also by the gear powered by the rotor.
BASE METAL
Any non-precious metal.
BATTERY
Device that converts chemical energy into electricity. Most watch batteries are silver oxide type delivering 1.5 volts. Much longer-lasting lithium batteries are 3 volt.
BATTERY LIFE
The minimum period of time that a battery will continue to provide power to run the watch. Life begins at the point of manufacture when the factory initially installs the battery.
BATTERY RESERVE INDICATOR
Some battery-operated watches have a feature that indicates when the battery is approaching the end of its life. This is often indicated by the second hand moving in two second intervals instead of each second.
BEARING
Part on which a pivot turns, in watches it represented mostly by jewels.
BEVELING
Chamfering of edges of levers, bridges and other elements of a movement by 45░, a treatment typically found in high-grade movements.
BEZEL
Top part of case, often in a shape of the ring surrounding the watch face, sometimes holds the crystal. It may be integrated with the case middle or may be a separate element. It is snapped or screwed on to the middle.
BRACELET
A metal band attached to the case. It is called integral if there is no apparent discontinuity between case and bracelet and the profile of attachments is similar to the first link.
BRIDGE
Structural metal element of a movement - sometimes called **** or bar - supporting the wheel train, balance, escapement and barrel. Each bridge is fastened to the plate by means of screws and locked in a specific position by pins. In high-quality movements the sight surface is finished with various types of decoration.
BRUSHED, BRUSHING
Topical finishing giving metals a line finish, a clean and uniform look.
BUCKLE
Usually matching the case, it attaches the two parts of the leather strap around the wrist.
BUTTON
Push piece controls, usually at 2 o'clock and/or 4 o'clock on the dial to control special functions such as the chronograph or the alarm.

on Jan 11, 2010 | Watches

1 Answer

How do I set the time on an old Regina pocket watch. I can wind it and it runs well. The piece to wind the watch does not pull in or out to set the hands.


If you can wind your pocket watch using the crown, but you cannot see any way of setting the watch, you probably have a "lever-set" movement, though it's possible you might also have a "pin-set" movement. Do you see a little button you can push in, either at 1-2:00 or 10-11:00 on the watch case? If you, you have a pin set watch. Push and hold that little button in while you twist the winding crown, and that will let you set the time. End of problem.

Setting the time on a lever-set watch is a bit more complicated and will require taking off the front bezel of your pocket watch--the metal ring that holds the watch crystal in place. Pocket watch cases of this time are usually made in 3 pieces: the bezel, the main case body, and the back. The procedure used to remove your bezel depends on the type of watch case you have.

Take a close look at the front of your pocket watch. Do you see any hinges at the bottom (that is, below 6:00 and where the bezel meets the main case body)? I suspect that you won't, as double-hinged cases are usually associated with an older style of pocket watch, but it's worth checking. If you do see little hinges for the FRONT (it's more likely that the back will be hinged), then look for a little lip on the bezel that's used to pry open the front. Pull on that to open the case.

If you don't see hinges, which is what I expect, your front bezel unscrews. You can try to do this with your bare hands, but it's a lot easier if you have a bit of "gripping" rubber so your hands don't slip so badly. I have a small rectangle of shelf non-slip stuff that works perfectly for this. Turn the bezel counterclockwise. It may resist a little bit at first due to accumulated dirt, but then it should easily screw off.

Once you have the bezel away from the face, look closely at about 2:00 on the watch dial. Just at the edge of the dial, you should see a little lever or button. GENTLY pull this away from the watch face until it stops. Now, when you turn the winding crown, you should be able to set the time. Once the time is set, gently push the lever back to its prior position. Now, you should be able to wind the watch without changing the time.

Be very careful when screwing the bezel back onto the watch body. These parts typically have very fine threads, and it's easy to cross-thread the pieces. Don't force the two pieces together; once the threads catch properly, the front bezel will screw on easily without resistance.

An older style of pocket watch required the use of a little key to set the time from the back of the pocket watch movement. However, these watches were also wound by the same key, so the fact that you're able to wind this watch with a crown suggests to me that your watch doesn't use this system.

May 27, 2011 | Watches

1 Answer

I recently changed the battery on my casio 437 watch and now it won't turn on


There is a 437 stamped into the back of the case for one of the two versions (437 and 438) of Casio WR watches, with the 437 being the kind with raised rubbery number buttons. The model no. for the 437, also on the back case is CA-53W, useful for ordering parts (see below). These instructions are for the 437 but should be useful in many cases for other Casio watches, with numbers other than 437 or 438 on the back of the case. For example, the resetting process described in step 5 below appears to be common to many if not all Casio watches. There is no manual on the casio.com website for many watches, including the 437 and 438. There are no instructions for changing the watch battery in the manual for the 437 or 438 either, nor for many if not all Casio watches. If there is a 438 stamped on the back of the case, the chip is the same as on the 437. The buttons on the face of the 438 watch are flat plastic rather than raised and rubbery. The two buttons near the top serve the same function on the 438 watch as the right side buttons on the 437. The left top button on the 438 corresponds to the top right side of case nonindented button on the 437. The right top button on the 438 corresponds to the bottom right side of case lower indented button on the 437. Save time and money by replacing the battery yourself If you send your Casio watch off to have the battery replaced, it will likely cost you about $30 USD. Many jewelers will routinely send a Casio watch off for battery replacement rather than replace the battery themselves, so these instructions may help save you from delays and expense if you do it yourself. Likewise, jewelers may find these instructions useful for satisfying customers by replacing the battery on the spot rather than having to send the watch off to Casio. Materials needed a. 5/64" Phillips head screwdriver (A set of different size screwdrivers in a small black plastic case, including the 5/64" was bought for $1 USD at a local Dollar Tree store in the USA.) b. Watch battery identically numbered to the dead battery on the watch (2016 on 437 case back number) c. Metal tweezers to reset the watch d. Sil glyde gel grease or any other grease, to maintain water resistance f. Toothpick or similar to spread grease in O ring slot g. Ziplock plastic bag or bowl to hold the 4 small screws so they don't get lost Instructions on replacing the battery and resetting the watch 1. Take off 4 back screws, using the 5/64" Phillips head screwdriver. One screw was balky and needed to have the screwdriver handle attached to a vise grip pliars, with the watch held in the other hand and rotated. Putting the screwdriver handle in a vise would also work to stabilize the screwdriver, while turning the watch held in one hand. Set the 4 small screws aside in a ziplock bag or bowl. 2. Remove the red cellophane cover on the battery, held by two tabs cut into the cellophane fitting into a slot on the metal hold down battery strap atop the battery. 3. With a fingernail or toothpick (nothing metal), slide the battery to the side, out from under the metal hold down strap atop the battery. 4. Insert new battery with fingers/fingernails, sliding it into place from the side. The side, with the battery number showing (2016 on 437 case back number) faces outward, just as on the removed battery before it came out. The watch will continue to appear dead, with nothing showing on the display until the electronics are reset in step 5. 5. Reset the electronics by using a pair of metal tweezers to simultaneously touch with metal, the outward facing side of the battery, and the brass terminal in an indentation in the plastic about 4 o'clock and about 1/8" outside the battery diameter. To aid in orientation, there is a barely visible small AC (presumably meaning "all clear") pressed into the metal near the battery and the indented brass terminal at about 4 o'clock. It may be necessary to tilt the watch in the light so the light strikes the AC so it becomes visible. Verify the display is working. Resetting the time will be in step 11. 6. Reinsert the red cellophane cover removed in step 2. It may be necessary to slide a knife or similar between the strap holding the battery down, and the battery, to make room for the two cellophane tabs to be inserted in a small air space between the strap and the battery. (When installed, the cellophane tabs do not prevent current from flowing between the top of the battery and the battery hold down strap.) If you use a knife or other metallic object to open up the strap to battery space to allow entrance of the cellophane tabs, take care not to short the battery against metal parts of the watch other than the hold down strap. Quickly glance to see make sure the display is still working after the cellophane is back in place. If display not working, repeat steps 2, 5 and 6 (remove cellophane, reset watch, reinstall cellophane). 7. Remove the rectangular O ring from the case back removed in step 1, or the case, and coat it with Sil Glyde silicone gel grease or similar, to retain water resistance. White grease or any grease should also work. Set the coated O ring on the inside of the metal case back removed in step 1. The O ring will eventually mate back with the O ring slot in the plastic case. 8. Using a toothpick or similar, coat the rectangular O ring slot in the plastic case with the same grease used to coat the O ring in the metal case back, to provide extra water resistance. Grease is nonconductive, so there should be no damage from shorting if some of the grease gets inside the watch. 9. Wipe hands clean and wash hands and/or use plastic gloves to avoid putting too much grease on the outside of the watch. 10. Replace case back removed in step 1. Screw in the 4 removed screws with your 5/64" Phillips head screwdriver.

Dec 21, 2010 | Casio Watches

1 Answer

I have a Fossil Arkitekt wristwatch (FS-2919). on of the hands on one of the three tiny dials has come loose and is floating around the face. I probably wouldn't care, but the main watch hands get caught...


You will have to remove the back off the watch (cant take off the face). You MIGHT be able to access the hand from there, but you may have to adjust some of the watch inner movement and that will be risky but you can try.
Goood luck

Aug 21, 2010 | Fossil FS2919 Wrist Watch

1 Answer

How do you take the face of the watch off? the second hand fell off and I would like to fix it


This is called watch crystal or watch glass, not face. Do not even try to get it out, as this is not possible from the outside of watch. Nobody takes off watch crystal for refitting hands. For this you have to open your watch case, get the whole movement out and only then refit the hand. If you are not sure how to do that, better go and see watchmaker, or you may damage your watch and then repairs will cost much more than the cost for hand refitting. Rate me, plz.

Feb 19, 2010 | Fossil Metal Casual Quick Turn Sport...

1 Answer

Need help replacing battery in my nike Imara Womens watch? Which way does battery go in with plastic cradle?


1. Use a coin turn the battery hatch one-quarter turn counter-clockwise
2. Remove old battery from compartment. Keep plastic cradle and replate with 395/SW927R battery. Replace the new battery positive side facing up in the plastic cradle into the metal compartment in the watch. Ensure all three little tabs line up and twist cradle to lock into place. Make sure the O-ring is in proper placement on the cover and replace the battery hatch ensuring it is sealed completely!

Jan 28, 2010 | Nike Imara Run WR0075-014 Wrist Watch

1 Answer

Divers watch needs refurbished & repair.


http://service.movadogroup.com/pages.cfm?pid=4CD4575A-AB5B-AB72-9CDA4CE49DDD9176

This is a link to the Movado Group service centers, they make ESQ watches. It appears your watch has had water seep inside the case. It could be the seals around the caseback or crown. Whether repair is worth it, is up to you. I have had Casio dive watches I have sent into repair because I liked them, not for the value of the watch. In general ESQ makes a nice watch and if you like it, why not see what repair would cost. However, if this is a moisture problem, more than just visible corrosion has probably occured and the movement could compromised, if that is the case the costs of repair might outweigh just purchasing another watch. Good luck and I hope you found this helpful,

Apr 03, 2009 | ESQ Blackfin 300m Dive Watch Black Dial...

1 Answer

Skagen watch


Yoy have to take off the back. Does the back have notches(5 of them) around the back cover? If it does take a pair of needle nose pliers and turn counter-clockwise to loosen. If the back has no notches then there must be a little lip where you have to pry off the back. Look carefully sometimes it is hard to see.. You have to use a sharp strong knife, like a swiss army knife, something that is sharp but has a little meat to it. Once the back is off,look at the movement. Now pull out the crown ( the part for setting the watch) and as you do, look for a metal piece that is in the movement (probibly to the derect left if you are right handed) that has a little dimple and moves as you pull in and out on the crown. Once you find that, use a small pin and LIGHTY push down on the that piece as you pull out the crown. The crown and a long piece should come out (the crown and the stem which are connected) You should be able to take out the movement now. Some advice: don't use super glue, it has gasses in it that will ruin your face of the watch.Maybe a model glue would be better, I being a watchmaker usr jewelers glue. Do not put the movement back in for about a hour just in case of any gasses.When done gently push the stem and crown back in and close the back. If you have any problems,please let me know. Maybe I can walk you through it. Good Luck!!!

Aug 04, 2008 | Watches

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