Question about Onkyo TX-DS777

2 Answers

No Life, does NOT power up, Fuse is OK

The unit fails to power up. There is no problem with the AC fuse, but somehow the 13 VDC dos not get generated. The 13 Volts transformer is OK. The "POWER" pin from the connector on the AC input PCB does not seem to be getting the up. Any thoughts? ? ? Thanks

SAM

Posted by on

  • TAWDI May 10, 2008

    Thank you much for trying. There is no problem with the standby transformer, secondary OK, Bridge rectifier across the secondary [13 v ] OK, but the unit does NOT even light up, nor does the power On/Off switch do anything. Even if the AC line is brought directly to the primary of the main power transformer the receiver does not even light up. Again thank you much for trying.Tawdi

×

2 Answers

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    Genius:

    An expert who has answered 1,000 questions.

  • Master
  • 1,224 Answers

Try this since it might be dead any ways put on surge protector hit the surge button 3 times fast this can shock the system and bring it back
heres another idea why its off fraid wires in the speaker outputs jacks sometimes the little wires pull off inside when disconnecting system this can trigger a fault in sterio to complete shut down till cleaned out hair is also a very good conductor to shutting down the system

Posted on May 10, 2008

  • Level 2:

    An expert who has achieved level 2 by getting 100 points

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    Sergeant:

    An expert that has over 500 points.

    Champion:

    An expert who has answered 200 questions.

  • Expert
  • 319 Answers

There is apparently some component in the stanby circuit that is malfunctioning. There may be a milli amp fuse off the standy transformer secondary. Check - don't confuse with a resistor. It may read 2 ohms or less

Posted on May 10, 2008

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of (from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones).
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

How do i turn on a compaq ps-7231 power supply?


Pin Name Color
Description 1 3.3V Orange +3.3 VDC 2 3.3V Orange +3.3 VDC 3 COM Black Ground 4 5V Red +5 VDC 5 COM Black Ground 6 5V Red +5 VDC 7 COM Black Ground 8 PWR_OK Gray Power Ok is a status signal generated by the power supply to notify the computer that the DC operating voltages are within the ranges required for proper computer operation (+5 VDC when power is Ok) 9 5VSB Purple +5 VDC Standby Voltage (max 10mA, max 2A in ATX 2.2 spec) 10 12V Yellow +12 VDC 11 12V Yellow +12 VDC 12 3.3V Orange +3.3 VDC 13 3.3V Orange +3.3 VDC. ATX V2.3 / EPS12V V2.92 both define that the PSU has to use remote sensing to compensate cable drops on the 3.3V line. Because of this there is an additional brown cable crimped together with the orange cable either to pin 13 (ATX) or pin 1 (EPS12V). 14 -12V Blue -12 VDC 15 COM Black Ground 16 /PS_ON Green Power Supply On (active low). Short this pin to GND to switch power supply ON, disconnect from GND to switch OFF. 17 COM Black Ground 18 COM Black Ground 19 COM Black Ground 20 -5V White -5 VDC (this is optional on newer ATX-2 supplies, it is for use with older AT class expansion cards and can be omitted on newer units) 21 +5V Red +5 VDC 22 +5V Red +5 VDC 23 +5V Red +5 VDC 24 COM Black Ground /PSON activated by pressing and releasing the power button while the power supply is in standby mode. Activating /PSON connects the power supply's /PSON input to ground, thereby switching the power supply to full-on condition.

Feb 26, 2015 | Compaq Computers & Internet

1 Answer

How to test voltage regaltor


Voltage Regulator Bleed Test if the battery is discharging wile sitting unused.

Ensure that the regulator is connected to battery, then unplug voltage regulator connector at the engine crankcase (the stator connector) to isolate the regulator from the stator windings. THEN using a test light, touch one probe to a suitable ground and touch the other to the regulator pins, one at a time. IF the tester light glows at any time the regulator is defective (shorted) and needs to be replaced.

OTHERWISE:

Motorcycle voltage regulator connections must be clean and tight for proper operation so it must be verified that both the AC (stator) connections and the DC (battery supply side) connectors are clean, fully inserted and locked in place with the regulator latches (they should also be coated with dielectric grease to keep them clean and corrosion free).

The motorcycle voltage regulator is a series regulator that is also a rectifier that changes stator supplied alternating current (AC) to direct current (DC) which the battery system requires. If the charging system does not keep the battery properly charged both with regards to Voltage (between 13 VDC minimum and 15.5 VDC maximum) and the current supply at a high enough amperage to meet the system lighting, ignition, TSM/TSSM, security and accessory requirements plus a minimum of 3.5 more amps (3.5 amps more than the foregoing system requirements) there are a number of tests that can be done to ascertain why.

As the voltage regulator must have a good, clean, tight (and otherwise secure) ground connection for proper operation a Voltage Regulator Ground Circuit Test can be accomplished by connecting an ohmmeter to a known good ground (like the battery negative post) and the case of the regulator. If there is continuity with little resistance the ground is GOOD and nothing more needs to be done BUT if there is NO continuity or there is more than minimal resistance the ground will need to be fixed so there is a low resistance continuity by either locating and fixing the poor ground or adding a new grounding wire from the regulator case to a know good ground.

A Voltage Regulator Power Circuit Test can be accomplished by turning OFF the Ignition, disconnecting the voltage regulator and with an ohmmeter set to the Rx1 setting, testing for continuity between the voltage regulator wire harness supply terminal and the main fuse terminal (with the fuse removed) and if there is continuity present then the wiring circuit here is GOOD but if there is NO continuity then you will need to either find the open and repair it or replace the whole wire running from the voltage regulator to the main fuse.

As there should be no short circuit in the power supply from the regulator to battery (main fuse) wiring OR in the regulator internal circuitry continuity from these both need to be checked again with an ohmmeter set to the Rx1 setting. If the regulator to main fuse wiring connector is not disconnected from the regulator you can connect an ohmmeter with one lead on the regulator supply wire terminal end at the main fuse (with the main fuse removed) and the other lead to a known good ground. If there is NO continuity then you know that both the supply wire and the regulator are okay (as there is no short to ground). BUT if there is continuity then either the regulator or wiring or both is/are shorted to ground. To determine where there is a short circuit (i.e. either the wiring or the regulator internal circuitry) you must disconnect the DC side of the wiring harness (the connector at the DC side of the regulator) from the regulator and test between either or both ends of the wire i.e. from the regulator wire harness connector terminal and a known good ground and/or the main fuse terminal end of the wire and a known good ground. If there is any continuity the wire is shorted to ground and the short circuit must be found and repaired or the wire must be completely replaced. If there is no such continuity then the regulator DC supply terminal (with the DC side of the regulator connector disconnected) must be tested by putting one lead of an ohmmeter on the regulator terminal and the other on a known good ground. If there is continuity the regulator is shorted to ground and must be replaced. If there is a short in the wiring it is unlikely BUT the regulator could ALSO be internally shorted so it should also be checked either before or after any wiring short is located and repaired.

The voltage regulator must also properly regulate the rectified DC voltage supplied to the battery so that it is not less than 13 VDC or more than 15.5 VDC. If the regulator is not properly limiting supply voltage to the battery to 15.5 VDC or less it will be overcharging the battery. This can be tested for by operating the motorcycle engine at 3000 rpm while placing a voltmeter between the battery positive and negative posts and reading the supplied voltage. If the reading is greater than 15.5 VDC the regulator is defective and must be replaced. If the voltage is less than 15.5 VDC but more than 13 VDC the regulator and the rest of the charging system are operating correctly. If the supplied voltage is less than 13 VDC the AC side of the system must be tested and if the AC side is good but the supplied voltage at the battery is less than 13 VDC then the regulator is defective and must be replaced. If the AC side of the system is not providing correct AC supply then the stator must be tested and if it is bad, replaced and if it is good then the rotor inspected (cannot be electrically tested as it consists of permanent magnets but it could be inspected fro physical damage and roughly tested for strong magnetic force fields by using a ferrous metal object to see if the attraction of the magnets is strong or weak, but this is basically a better guess rather than a precise measurement). The rotor can also be physically inspected for physical signs of damage including signs of the center hole having become oval AND the stator bolts inspected for possibly having come loose and into contact with the rotor.

Sep 09, 2014 | 2004 Harley Davidson FLHTC - FLHTCI...

1 Answer

2004 Ultra classic won't charge battery


Motorcycle voltage regulator connections must be clean and tight for proper operation so it must be verified that both the AC (stator) connections and the DC (battery supply side) connectors are clean, fully inserted and locked in place with the regulator latches (they should also be coated with dielectric grease to keep them clean and corrosion free).

The motorcycle voltage regulator is a series regulator that is also a rectifier that changes stator supplied alternating current (AC) to direct current (DC) which the battery system requires. If the charging system does not keep the battery properly charged both with regards to Voltage (between 13 VDC minimum and 15.5 VDC maximum) and the current supply at a high enough amperage to meet the system lighting, ignition, TSM/TSSM, security and accessory requirements plus a minimum of 3.5 more amps (3.5 amps more than the foregoing system requirements) there are a number of tests that can be done to ascertain why.

As the voltage regulator must have a good, clean, tight (and otherwise secure) ground connection for proper operation a Voltage Regulator Ground Circuit Test can be accomplished by connecting an ohmmeter to a known good ground (like the battery negative post) and the case of the regulator. If there is continuity with little resistance the ground is GOOD and nothing more needs to be done BUT if there is NO continuity or there is more than minimal resistance the ground will need to be fixed so there is a low resistance continuity by either locating and fixing the poor ground or adding a new grounding wire from the regulator case to a know good ground.

A Voltage Regulator Power Circuit Test can be accomplished by turning OFF the Ignition, disconnecting the voltage regulator and with an ohmmeter set to the Rx1 setting, testing for continuity between the voltage regulator wire harness supply terminal and the main fuse terminal (with the fuse removed) and if there is continuity present then the wiring circuit here is GOOD but if there is NO continuity then you will need to either find the open and repair it or replace the whole wire running from the voltage regulator to the main fuse.

As there should be no short circuit in the power supply from the regulator to battery (main fuse) wiring OR in the regulator internal circuitry continuity from these both need to be checked again with an ohmmeter set to the Rx1 setting. If the regulator to main fuse wiring connector is not disconnected from the regulator you can connect an ohmmeter with one lead on the regulator supply wire terminal end at the main fuse (with the main fuse removed) and the other lead to a known good ground. If there is NO continuity then you know that both the supply wire and the regulator are okay (as there is no short to ground). BUT if there is continuity then either the regulator or wiring or both is/are shorted to ground. To determine where there is a short circuit (i.e. either the wiring or the regulator internal circuitry) you must disconnect the DC side of the wiring harness (the connector at the DC side of the regulator) from the regulator and test between either or both ends of the wire i.e. from the regulator wire harness connector terminal and a known good ground and/or the main fuse terminal end of the wire and a known good ground. If there is any continuity the wire is shorted to ground and the short circuit must be found and repaired or the wire must be completely replaced. If there is no such continuity then the regulator DC supply terminal (with the DC side of the regulator connector disconnected) must be tested by putting one lead of an ohmmeter on the regulator terminal and the other on a known good ground. If there is continuity the regulator is shorted to ground and must be replaced. If there is a short in the wiring it is unlikely BUT the regulator could ALSO be internally shorted so it should also be checked either before or after any wiring short is located and repaired.

The voltage regulator must also properly regulate the rectified DC voltage supplied to the battery so that it is not less than 13 VDC or more than 15.5 VDC. If the regulator is not properly limiting supply voltage to the battery to 15.5 VDC or less it will be overcharging the battery. This can be tested for by operating the motorcycle engine at 3000 rpm while placing a voltmeter between the battery positive and negative posts and reading the supplied voltage. If the reading is greater than 15.5 VDC the regulator is defective and must be replaced. If the voltage is less than 15.5 VDC but more than 13 VDC the regulator and the rest of the charging system are operating correctly. If the supplied voltage is less than 13 VDC the AC side of the system must be tested and if the AC side is good but the supplied voltage at the battery is less than 13 VDC then the regulator is defective and must be replaced. If the AC side of the system is not providing correct AC supply then the stator must be tested and if it is bad, replaced and if it is good then the rotor inspected (cannot be electrically tested as it consists of permanent magnets but it could be inspected fro physical damage and roughly tested for strong magnetic force fields by using a ferrous metal object to see if the attraction of the magnets is strong or weak, but this is basically a better guess rather than a precise measurement). The rotor can also be physically inspected for physical signs of damage including signs of the center hole having become oval AND the stator bolts inspected for possibly having come loose and into contact with the rotor.


AC Output Check
Disconnect the voltage regulator connector from the alternator stator wiring and then connect an AC voltmeter across both stator sockets of a two wire stator, or if a three wire stator across two of the three for example 1 & 3 and then later you will repeat the test between 2 & 3 and later between 1 & 2. THEN run the engine at as close as possible in the circumstances to 2000 RPM. The AC output should be approximately 32-40 VAC, approximately 16-20 VAC per 1000 RPM. If you have done a stator static test and the stator has proven to be in good mechanical condition and the AC output is below specifications, the charging problem is going to be a faulty rotor. If you have not done a static stator check yet and the AC output is less than as set out above it may be that the stator is defective and the static stator check will need to be done. While the regulator has nothing whatsoever to do with the alternator output, if the alternator output is good the regulator might be defective in either rectification or in limiting the output to the battery to under 15 VDC. If AC output is low and the stator has passed the static stator check then it is likely that the permanent magnets in the alternator rotor are weak. A permanent magnet can lose its magnetic strength if it is dropped or shocked such as letting it snap into place when being installed or possibly by use of an impact wrench to remove the compensator fastener etc.

Apr 28, 2014 | 2004 Harley Davidson FLHTCUI Electra Glide...

1 Answer

Transparecy issue


+24 VDC power is failed. Status Code 102-319 is displayed after 116-325 is displayed.
+24V LVPS is failed. Perform following:
Remove Rear Cover (REP 14.2).
Remove cover from +24V LVPS (PL 9.1).
Disconnect P502 on +24V LVPS (Figure 1).
Check that power is switched off. Measure resistance of fuse on +24V LVPS. Resistance is 1
ohm or less.
if no Replace +24V LVPS (PL 9.1).
if yes Switch on the power. Measure the AC voltage between the white and black wires in P2 on the
+24 VDC. 110 or 220 VAC is measured.

Sep 13, 2010 | Xerox DocuColor 3535 Copier

3 Answers

I turned the DVD player off last night and this morning it will not turn on. Any thoughts, suggestions? I do have a DVD in the player that I need to get out somehow....


it is possible that the power supply unit in the DVD has failed. You will need to open and ccheck, the fuse might be open and if a new fuse blows out then the SMPS unit is faulty.
Possible that the Sm driver IC /driver has failed. Possible also for allied components to have failed.
Or else you can change with a new unit.
Helpful?

Aug 28, 2010 | Samsung DVD-V3500 DVD Player/VCR

1 Answer

A power surge seems to have burned out my Toshiba TV/VCR combo.


The power supply does have fuses. They require removing the back cover of the unit. Note: High voltage is present so I recommend having a pro do this.
In units like this many times a part will fail and the fuses will be ok. At this point you will need a pro again.
I would replace the unit. The repair cost could be in the 60 dollar range depending on the severity of the problem and shop rates in your area.

May 08, 2010 | Toshiba MD13P3 13 in. TV/DVD Combo

1 Answer

Pin Name Color Description


Yes this is a good list of the voltages to be expected from a newer power supply on just the main header

Apr 01, 2009 | HP Compaq dc7100 PC Desktop

Not finding what you are looking for?
Onkyo TX-DS777 Logo

Related Topics:

229 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Onkyo Audio Players & Recorders Experts

Dennis McCollum

Level 2 Expert

137 Answers

 Grubhead
Grubhead

Level 3 Expert

4853 Answers

The Knight
The Knight

Level 3 Expert

72640 Answers

Are you an Onkyo Audio Player and Recorder Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...