Question about Computers & Internet

1 Answer

True or false computers process information (output) into data (input)

Posted by on

  • 2 more comments 
  • jayniko2000 Sep 01, 2010

    are you there

  • jayniko2000 Sep 01, 2010

    true or false communications has become an essential element of the information processing cycle

  • jayniko2000 Sep 01, 2010

    true or false a client controls how data and instructions are entered and how information displays on the screen

  • jayniko2000 Sep 01, 2010

    True or fase the user interface controls how data and instructions are entered and how information displays on the screen

×

1 Answer

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    Superstar:

    An expert that got 20 achievements.

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

  • Master
  • 4,472 Answers

False, it takes raw data as input to produce information as output.
Thank you and enjoy,
Lee

Posted on Sep 01, 2010

  • Lee A.
    Lee A. Sep 01, 2010

    Our system is based off of answering one question that you enter, not unlimited for future reference.
    true or false communications has become an essential element of the information processing cycle = true
    true or false a client controls how data and instructions are entered and how information displays on the screen =false a user interface does this.

    True or false the user interface controls how data and instructions are
    entered and how information displays on the screen = true.

    Thank you and enjoy and as always thank you for using FixYa!,
    Lee

×

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of (from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones).
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

The information contained in movie false or true?


The answer to any "true or false" question is always YES.
Only one of "true" or "false" needs to be satisfied for the answer to be YES.

Mar 07, 2015 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

What is electronic data processing


That is where any kind of data, numeric or alpha or both, is fed into an app, like a database or spreadsheet or some more complex program, and output is obtained in the desired format.

So the hallmark here is that the output depend on 3 things, quality of data input, quality of the app, and quality of the processing machine.

Jun 23, 2014 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Debug error


An "assertion" is a booby-trap inside a computer program.

Under normal conditions, the programmer has determined that his/her program will always find that the \'ASSERT\' statement is "true", e.g., \'ASSERT X > 0\'. However, in your case, somehow the value of \'X\' makes the statement to be "false". Then, the program "stops", due to something seriously being "wrong".

It\'s either some incorrect input data being fed to the program, or a "software-bug" inside the program.

Check your input.

Contact the author of the program.

Mar 13, 2014 | Microsoft XP Computers & Internet

1 Answer

With help of a diagram describe a data processing cycle.


Some would say Input, Processing, Output. The diagram would be an arrow from input to processing, then an arrow from processing to to output. Then an arrow from output to Input in this way of looking at it. You will find more complicated descriptions and diagrams, too.

http://technology.blurtit.com/300718/what-is-data-processing-cycle
The data processing cycle:

It is Sequence of steps performed repeatedly by a computer in the execution of a program. The computer's central processing unit (CPU) continuously works through a loop. It fetches a program instruction from memory. Then the CPU fetches any data it needs. Then it applies the data to the program. It stores the result in memory. Then it fetches another program instruction.
Others include more stages: http://www.enterprisefeatures.com/6-important-stages-in-the-data-processing-cycle/

data collection
data preparation
data input
data processing
data storage
data output

Aug 03, 2011 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

The most common output device is the speakker ? true or false?


depends but yes, the common output devices are the Monitor that lets you see whats happening on the computer without this you cant see or do anything then i would say the speakers as you can use a computer with or without speakers. the input devices are usually the keyboard then the mouse as you can still control a computer without a mouse just a bit more complicated. If i have helped please rate me Kronoguy

Jul 12, 2011 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

I keep getting the message The data file 'personal folders' was not closed properly when I open Outlook, how can I prevent this from happening?


Hi,


The underlying reason why Outlook displays this "data file" check is very simple. There is a single flag in the header of the data file that is a Boolean value (True or False). While you use Outlook the value of this flag is constantly changing as the data file is updated. When the update begins the value is changed to False and then when the update completes the value is changed back to True (implying the update is finished and successful).


So, the key to the problem is the shut down process because once the Outlook.exe process is exited this flag value cannot be changed. If the Outlook.exe process was terminated prematurely or a 3rd party add-in did not properly set the flag value to True then the flag value can be left at False. If you start Outlook with a data file where the value of the flag is False you are guaranteed to see the "data file" check. If the value of the flag is True then you will not see the "data file" check.


Right now, there are a few known common causes for this issue:


- Shutting down Windows before the Outlook.exe process has exited

- 3rd party add-ins improperly "closing" the data file

- Outlook crashing

- Non-Outlook process accessing the data file


http://support.microsoft.com/kb/954642/en-us

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/948733/en-us


Regarding the post advised by Rod, I would like to explain more detailed:

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

When you shut down Outlook, the Outlook window goes away, but the Outlook.exe process can continue to run for some time. That's why you can see Outlook.exe sitting in Task Manager for a few minutes after closing the Outlook window. If you shut down Windows while the Outlook.exe process is still running Windows will not wait for the Outlook.exe process to exit. So, you increase the likelihood of encountering the "data file check" issue the next time you start Outlook (because the Outlook.exe process was not able to "close" your data file(s) completely before Windows was shut down).

On the other hand, if you leave Outlook running when you shut down Windows the Outlook.exe process will continue to run and exit on its own. When Windows is shut down, it sends messages to all visible window frames telling them to quit, and will wait for those programs to quit before shutting down. Not until all processes with open windows have exited will Windows finally shut down. This is somewhat counter-intuitive to most people as traditional training has always advised manually closing applications before shutting down Windows.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Mar 10, 2011 | Microsoft Computers & Internet

2 Answers

Parts of computers and its function


Computer: A machine that processes information and performs computations.
Tower or CPU: The "box" or case that holds the parts that make up a computer: CPU, hard disk drive, floppy drive, memory chips, power supply, interface cards, etc.

CPU: Central Processing Unit, or "brains" of the Computer.
Monitor: An output display device (looks similar to a TV) in a computer system. You see information on the monitor's screen.
Screen: The viewing area on a monitor or the information or image displayed.
Disk Drive: A device that reads data from (input) or records data onto a disk for storage (output).
Hard Drive: The main device that a computer uses to store information. Most computers come with a hard drive, called drive C, located inside the computer case.
CD-ROM: ROM means Read-Only-Memory - you can only "read" information, not save. A CD can store a large amount of data including documents, photographs, software, and music (about 20 songs)
Mouse: A hand-held input device you roll on your desk to point to and select items on your screen. When you move the mouse, the mouse pointer on the screen moves in the same direction.
Speakers: Output device that produces sound and music when connected to the computer. Speakers come in different shapes and may even be in the monitor's case.
Headphones: Output device for listening that is held over the ears by a band worn on the head.
Microphone: Input device in which sound energy is changed into electrical energy for the sending or recording sound (your voice).
Scanner: Input device that reads copy as an image and digitally records the image.





Jul 05, 2010 | Dell Inspiron 530 Desktop Computer

1 Answer

Validating in jsp


JavaScript Form Validation JavaScript can be used to validate input data in HTML forms before sending off the content to a server.
Form data that typically are checked by a JavaScript could be:
  • has the user left required fields empty?
  • has the user entered a valid e-mail address?
  • has the user entered a valid date?
  • has the user entered text in a numeric field?
Required Fields The function below checks if a required field has been left empty. If the required field is blank, an alert box alerts a message and the function returns false. If a value is entered, the function returns true (means that data is OK):
function validate_required(field,alerttxt)
{
with (field)
{
if (value==null||value=="")
{
alert(alerttxt);return false;
}
else
{
return true;
}
}
} The entire script, with the HTML form could look something like this:
<html>
<head>
<script type="text/javascript">
function validate_required(field,alerttxt)
{
with (field)
{
if (value==null||value=="")
{alert(alerttxt);return false;}
else {return true}
}
} function validate_form(thisform)
{
with (thisform)
{
if (validate_required(email,"Email must be filled out!")==false)
{email.focus();return false;}
}
}
</script>
</head> <body>
<form action="submitpage.htm"
onsubmit="return validate_form(this)"
method="post">
Email: <input type="text" name="email" size="30">
<input type="submit" value="Submit">
</form>
</body> </html>
E-mail Validation The function below checks if the content has the general syntax of an email.
This means that the input data must contain at least an @ sign and a dot (.). Also, the @ must not be the first character of the email address, and the last dot must at least be one character after the @ sign:
function validate_email(field,alerttxt)
{
with (field)
{
apos=value.indexOf("@");
dotpos=value.lastIndexOf(".");
if (apos<1||dotpos-apos<2)
{alert(alerttxt);return false;}
else {return true;}
}
} The entire script, with the HTML form could look something like this:
<html>
<head>
<script type="text/javascript">
function validate_email(field,alerttxt)
{
with (field)
{
apos=value.indexOf("@");
dotpos=value.lastIndexOf(".");
if (apos<1||dotpos-apos<2)
{alert(alerttxt);return false;}
else {return true;}
}
} function validate_form(thisform)
{
with (thisform)
{
if (validate_email(email,"Not a valid e-mail address!")==false)
{email.focus();return false;}
}
}
</script>
</head> <body>
<form action="submitpage.htm"
onsubmit="return validate_form(this);"
method="post">
Email: <input type="text" name="email" size="30">
<input type="submit" value="Submit">
</form>
</body> </html>


P.S.: If this information was helpful, please rate this solution.

Mar 13, 2009 | Sun Java Programming Language (cdj-275)

1 Answer

Validation code using single loop for multiple fields in javascript


As example, use it:

JavaScript Form ValidationJavaScript can be used to validate input data in HTML forms before sending off the content to a server.
Form data that typically are checked by a JavaScript could be:
  • has the user left required fields empty?
  • has the user entered a valid e-mail address?
  • has the user entered a valid date?
  • has the user entered text in a numeric field?
Required FieldsThe function below checks if a required field has been left empty. If the required field is blank, an alert box alerts a message and the function returns false. If a value is entered, the function returns true (means that data is OK):
function validate_required(field,alerttxt)
{
with (field)
{
if (value==null||value=="")
{
alert(alerttxt);return false;
}
else
{
return true;
}
}
}The entire script, with the HTML form could look something like this:
<html>
<head>
<script type="text/javascript">
function validate_required(field,alerttxt)
{
with (field)
{
if (value==null||value=="")
{alert(alerttxt);return false;}
else {return true}
}
}function validate_form(thisform)
{
with (thisform)
{
if (validate_required(email,"Email must be filled out!")==false)
{email.focus();return false;}
}
}
</script>
</head><body>
<form action="submitpage.htm"
onsubmit="return validate_form(this)"
method="post">
Email: <input type="text" name="email" size="30">
<input type="submit" value="Submit">
</form>
</body></html>
E-mail ValidationThe function below checks if the content has the general syntax of an email.
This means that the input data must contain at least an @ sign and a dot (.). Also, the @ must not be the first character of the email address, and the last dot must at least be one character after the @ sign:
function validate_email(field,alerttxt)
{
with (field)
{
apos=value.indexOf("@");
dotpos=value.lastIndexOf(".");
if (apos<1||dotpos-apos<2)
{alert(alerttxt);return false;}
else {return true;}
}
}The entire script, with the HTML form could look something like this:
<html>
<head>
<script type="text/javascript">
function validate_email(field,alerttxt)
{
with (field)
{
apos=value.indexOf("@");
dotpos=value.lastIndexOf(".");
if (apos<1||dotpos-apos<2)
{alert(alerttxt);return false;}
else {return true;}
}
}function validate_form(thisform)
{
with (thisform)
{
if (validate_email(email,"Not a valid e-mail address!")==false)
{email.focus();return false;}
}
}
</script>
</head><body>
<form action="submitpage.htm"
onsubmit="return validate_form(this);"
method="post">
Email: <input type="text" name="email" size="30">
<input type="submit" value="Submit">
</form>


P.S.: If this information was helpful, please rate this solution.
</body></html>

Mar 04, 2009 | Computers & Internet

Not finding what you are looking for?
Computers & Internet Logo

Related Topics:

1,350 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Computers & Internet Experts

Doctor PC
Doctor PC

Level 3 Expert

7733 Answers

kakima

Level 3 Expert

102366 Answers

David Payne
David Payne

Level 3 Expert

14161 Answers

Are you a Computer and Internet Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...