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My 10X42 #28-4210 binoculars - I am unable to focus them. Can't get both eyes to focus together.

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Posted on Dec 02, 2008

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Posted on Jun 29, 2009

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Posted on Aug 02, 2009

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SOURCE: unable to focus my Bushnell 7x35 insta-vision binoculars

insta-vision bino's are self focusing no adjustments.

Posted on Nov 02, 2009

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I see double image unless I take the lens as close as the binoculars can go


thats how binoculars are. Yours in this case is really strong. the closer you are to something, looking at it, the more magiflyed you going to be. try view things far a distance, really far away. no more double right?
Everything you need to know to become an expert:
on this website: http://www.chuckhawks.com/binocular_basics.htm
It is surprising how many people do not know how to focus binoculars correctly. There are two common focusing systems used in binoculars.
The first is individual eyepiece focus. This system is simple to understand, and easy to manufacture. It also lends itself well to sealed optical tubes, and thus is usually the focusing system used for waterproof binoculars. Individual eyepiece focus means that to focus the binoculars to your eyes, you simply focus the left eyepiece to your left eye and the right eyepiece to your right eye. There is no centrally located focusing mechanism. It is done like this. Look at something in the distance. Close the right eye (or cover the front of the right binocular), and focus the left eyepiece to your left eye. Close the left eye (or cover the front of the left binocular), and focus the right eyepiece to your right eye. You are finished, until you need to look at something at a different distance, in which case you need to repeat the process.
Because individual eyepiece focus is time-consuming, center focus is more common. Unfortunately, very few people understand how to correctly use center focus binoculars. Here is how it is done. Aim your binoculars at something in the distance. Close the right eye (or cover the front of the right tube), and focus the left side of the binocular to your left eye using the center focus control, which is concentric with the pivot shaft between the binoculars. (Note: the left eyepiece itself does not focus on center focus binoculars.) Next, close your left eye (or cover the front of the left tube), and focus the right eyepiece to your right eye. DO NOT touch the center focus control while you are focusing the right eyepiece to your right eye. Now you are finished. What you have just done is adjust the binoculars for your individual eyes. (Practically everybody's left and right eyes are different.) From now on, you only need to adjust the center focus control when you look at things at different distances. Center focus is faster and easier to use than individual eyepiece focus, once you have initially set the binoculars for your eyes.
Binoculars are commonly described by using a pair of numbers, as in "7x50" or "8x25." The first of these numbers refers to the magnification offered by the binocular. Magnification is why most people buy a pair of binoculars. In the examples above, "7x" means the binocular makes whatever you look at appear seven times closer than it does to the unaided human eye. "8x" means the binocular makes whatever you look at eight times closer than the unaided human eye. "10x" makes things look ten times closer, and so on. The first number used to describe binoculars always refers to their magnification. Common binocular magnifications are 6x, 7x, 8x, 9x, and 10x.
There are also variable power (zoom) binoculars, such as 7-21x50. These almost always perform much better at the low power setting than they do at the higher settings. This is natural, since the front objective cannot enlarge to let in more light as the power is increased, so the view gets dimmer. At 7x, the 50mm front objective provides a 7.1mm exit pupil, but at 21x, the same front objective provides only a 2.38mm exit pupil. Also, the optical quality of a zoom binocular at any given power is inferior to that of a fixed power binocular of that power. In general, zoom binoculars are not the bargain they seem to be.
Remember that everything (including movement) is magnified when you look through a pair of binoculars, especially your own shakes and tremors. So the higher the power, the harder it seems to hold the binoculars steady. 6, 7, or 8 power binoculars are easier for most people, even those with very steady hands, to hold reasonably still. The higher powers sound like a good deal, but often result in jiggly, blurred views. This is why 7x binoculars are chosen by so many experts, including the military.
Power affects brightness. Other things being equal, the higher the power, the dimmer the view. And power also affects the field of view of the binoculars. Again, everything being equal, the higher the power, the smaller the field of view. So, as you can see, power must be balanced against other desirable characteristics when choosing binoculars.

May 09, 2011 | Bushnell 240842 Binocular

1 Answer

I am seeing a double image whel I look through my binocular.


Hi,

Most binoculars should allow you to grip the two sides and pull them closer together to fit the distance between your eyes.. Have you tried this?
What you should see is the two images come together to form one.

If you have tried this already and you still get the two images then it's possible the model is just too wide for your eyes.. If they're new you could try return them for another type that fit better..

If this works for you then here are the instructions for setting up the binoculars to give you the best result for your eyesight..


This is more common than you would think.. Here's how to set up a pair of binoculars to suit yourself.
Any good binocular will be able to do this and the reason is to allow you to adjust them for the difference in strenght between your two eyes. I wear glasses myself and sometimes contact lenses so it's good to be able to quickly adjust them.

1. turn the binoculars over so you are looking at the underside.
2. on the eyepieces can you see on one eye(usually the right eye) a little plus - minus marking. The eyepiece should be able to rotate a little to each side of this marking.
3. Set the rotating eyepiece to the middle setting.
4. Look through the binoculars as normal and bring the two sides together until you form the two circles that you see into one.
5. Pick an object app 10 meters away.
6 Presuming that the adjustable eyepiece is on the right hand side then close your right eye, look at the middle distance object you chose with your left eye and use the central focusing knob/wheel in the middle to bring your left eyepiece into focus.
7. Now, close your left eye and adjust the rotating right hand eyepiece while looking at the same object until your right eyepiece is in focus.
8. The binoculars should now be set for the differences in strenght of your eyes and you can use the middle focus control as normal.

Most binoculars have a soft rubber eyepiece that can be folded back for people who wear glasses but I, like most people I know who wear glasses, find it horribly uncomfortable.

This method allows you to set them for yourself and if someone else uses your binoculars you can quickly reset them for you.

Hope this helps...


- Oh yeah, sorry, forgot to mention.. This set up is so you can use them without wearing your glasses.. Much more comfortable!!

Oct 20, 2009 | Sharper Image Optics

1 Answer

I wear glasses. I can't see through binoculars with glasses on or off.


Hi,

This is more common than you would think.. Here's how to set up a pair of binoculars to suit yourself.
Any good binocular will be able to do this and the reason is to allow you to adjust them for the difference in strenght between your two eyes. I wear glasses myself and sometimes contact lenses so it's good to be able to quickly adjust them.

1. turn the binoculars over so you are looking at the underside.
2. on the eyepieces can you see on one eye(usually the right eye) a little plus - minus marking. The eyepiece should be able to rotate a little to each side of this marking.
3. Set the rotating eyepiece to the middle setting.
4. Look through the binoculars as normal and bring the two sides together until you form the two circles that you see into one.
5. Pick an object app 10 meters away.
6 Presuming that the adjustable eyepiece is on the right hand side then close your right eye, look at the middle distance object you chose with your left eye and use the central focusing knob/wheel in the middle to bring your left eyepiece into focus.
7. Now, close your left eye and adjust the rotating right hand eyepiece while looking at the same object until your right eyepiece is in focus.
8. The binoculars should now be set for the differences in strenght of your eyes and you can use the middle focus control as normal.

Most binoculars have a soft rubber eyepiece that can be folded back for people who wear glasses but I, like most people I know who wear glasses, find it horribly uncomfortable.

This method allows you to set them for yourself and if someone else uses your binoculars you can quickly reset them for you.

Hope this helps...

Oct 12, 2009 | Bushnell Optics

1 Answer

I have a jason 2000 and when i look through it i see double and was wondering how to adjust it back to be able to see right


Hi,

You should be able to grab both sides of the binoculars and pull them together until the two images merge into one.. If you've done this already then the chances are that this model is too wide for the distance between your eyes (It happens more than you would think!!)
If this is the case, and they're new, you could try returning them to exchange for a better fitting pair..

Here are the instructions for setting up binoculars to suit your own eye-set and strength. You should be familiar with this when buying binoculars so you can test them in the shop..
The model you have is permafocus so you won't be able to adjust the focus but the first part should get you started..

This is more common than you would think.. Here's how to set up a pair of binoculars to suit yourself.
Any good binocular will be able to do this and the reason is to allow you to adjust them for the difference in strenght between your two eyes. I wear glasses myself and sometimes contact lenses so it's good to be able to quickly adjust them.

1. turn the binoculars over so you are looking at the underside.
2. on the eyepieces can you see on one eye(usually the right eye) a little plus - minus marking. The eyepiece should be able to rotate a little to each side of this marking.
3. Set the rotating eyepiece to the middle setting.
4. Look through the binoculars as normal and bring the two sides together until you form the two circles that you see into one.
5. Pick an object app 10 meters away.
6 Presuming that the adjustable eyepiece is on the right hand side then close your right eye, look at the middle distance object you chose with your left eye and use the central focusing knob/wheel in the middle to bring your left eyepiece into focus.
7. Now, close your left eye and adjust the rotating right hand eyepiece while looking at the same object until your right eyepiece is in focus.
8. The binoculars should now be set for the differences in strenght of your eyes and you can use the middle focus control as normal.

Most binoculars have a soft rubber eyepiece that can be folded back for people who wear glasses but I, like most people I know who wear glasses, find it horribly uncomfortable.

This method allows you to set them for yourself and if someone else uses your binoculars you can quickly reset them for you.

Hope this helps...


- Oh yeah, sorry, forgot to mention.. This set up is so you can use them without wearing your glasses.. Much more comfortable!!

Oct 09, 2009 | Optics

1 Answer

I see 2 planes of vision on my 8x24 weaver binocular


Hi,

This is more common than you would think.. Here's how to set up a pair of binoculars to suit yourself.
Any good binocular will be able to do this and the reason is to allow you to adjust them for the difference in strenght between your two eyes. I wear glasses myself and sometimes contact lenses so it's good to be able to quickly adjust them.

1. turn the binoculars over so you are looking at the underside.
2. on the eyepieces can you see on one eye(usually the right eye) a little plus - minus marking. The eyepiece should be able to rotate a little to each side of this marking.
3. Set the rotating eyepiece to the middle setting.
4. Look through the binoculars as normal and bring the two sides together until you form the two circles that you see into one.
5. Pick an object app 10 meters away.
6 Presuming that the adjustable eyepiece is on the right hand side then close your right eye, look at the middle distance object you chose with your left eye and use the central focusing knob/wheel in the middle to bring your left eyepiece into focus.
7. Now, close your left eye and adjust the rotating right hand eyepiece while looking at the same object until your right eyepiece is in focus.
8. The binoculars should now be set for the differences in strenght of your eyes and you can use the middle focus control as normal.

Most binoculars have a soft rubber eyepiece that can be folded back for people who wear glasses but I, like most people I know who wear glasses, find it horribly uncomfortable.

This method allows you to set them for yourself and if someone else uses your binoculars you can quickly reset them for you.

Hope this helps...


- Oh yeah, sorry, forgot to mention.. This set up is so you can use them without wearing your glasses.. Much more comfortable!!

Sep 28, 2009 | Weaver 849433 (8x24) Binocular

1 Answer

Each eye is clear, but they aren't lined up right...it is like being crosseyed.


Hi,

This is more common than you would think.. Here's how to set up a pair of binoculars to suit yourself.
Any good binocular will be able to do this and the reason is to allow you to adjust them for the difference in strenght between your two eyes. I wear glasses myself and sometimes contact lenses so it's good to be able to quickly adjust them.

1. turn the binoculars over so you are looking at the underside.
2. on the eyepieces can you see on one eye(usually the right eye) a little plus - minus marking. The eyepiece should be able to rotate a little to each side of this marking.
3. Set the rotating eyepiece to the middle setting.
4. Look through the binoculars as normal and bring the two sides together until you form the two circles that you see into one.
5. Pick an object app 10 meters away.
6 Presuming that the adjustable eyepiece is on the right hand side then close your right eye, look at the middle distance object you chose with your left eye and use the central focusing knob/wheel in the middle to bring your left eyepiece into focus.
7. Now, close your left eye and adjust the rotating right hand eyepiece while looking at the same object until your right eyepiece is in focus.
8. The binoculars should now be set for the differences in strenght of your eyes and you can use the middle focus control as normal.

Most binoculars have a soft rubber eyepiece that can be folded back for people who wear glasses but I, like most people I know who wear glasses, find it horribly uncomfortable.

This method allows you to set them for yourself and if someone else uses your binoculars you can quickly reset them for you.

Hope this helps...


- Oh yeah, sorry, forgot to mention.. This set up is so you can use them without wearing your glasses.. Much more comfortable!!

Sep 26, 2009 | Nikon Travelite V Binocular

1 Answer

Double vision in minolta binoculars


Hi,

This is more common than you would think.. Here's how to set up a pair of binoculars to suit yourself.
Any good binocular will be able to do this and the reason is to allow you to adjust them for the difference in strenght between your two eyes. I wear glasses myself and sometimes contact lenses so it's good to be able to quickly adjust them.

1. turn the binoculars over so you are looking at the underside.
2. on the eyepieces can you see on one eye(usually the right eye) a little plus - minus marking. The eyepiece should be able to rotate a little to each side of this marking.
3. Set the rotating eyepiece to the middle setting.
4. Look through the binoculars as normal and bring the two sides together until you form the two circles that you see into one.
5. Pick an object app 10 meters away.
6 Presuming that the adjustable eyepiece is on the right hand side then close your right eye, look at the middle distance object you chose with your left eye and use the central focusing knob/wheel in the middle to bring your left eyepiece into focus.
7. Now, close your left eye and adjust the rotating right hand eyepiece while looking at the same object until your right eyepiece is in focus.
8. The binoculars should now be set for the differences in strenght of your eyes and you can use the middle focus control as normal.

Most binoculars have a soft rubber eyepiece that can be folded back for people who wear glasses but I, like most people I know who wear glasses, find it horribly uncomfortable.

This method allows you to set them for yourself and if someone else uses your binoculars you can quickly reset them for you.

Hope this helps...


- Oh yeah, sorry, forgot to mention.. This set up is so you can use them without wearing your glasses.. Much more comfortable!!

Aug 30, 2009 | Minolta Activa Standard Zoom Binocular

1 Answer

Cannot get them into clear focus


Hi,

This is more common than you would think.. Here's how to set up a pair of binoculars to suit yourself.
Any good binocular will be able to do this and the reason is to allow you to adjust them for the difference in strenght between your two eyes. I wear glasses myself and sometimes contact lenses so it's good to be able to quickly adjust them.

1. turn the binoculars over so you are looking at the underside.
2. on the eyepieces can you see on one eye(usually the right eye) a little plus - minus marking. The eyepiece should be able to rotate a little to each side of this marking.
3. Set the rotating eyepiece to the middle setting.
4. Look through the binoculars as normal and bring the two sides together until you form the two circles that you see into one.
5. Pick an object app 10 meters away.
6 Presuming that the adjustable eyepiece is on the right hand side then close your right eye, look at the middle distance object you chose with your left eye and use the central focusing knob/wheel in the middle to bring your left eyepiece into focus.
7. Now, close your left eye and adjust the rotating right hand eyepiece while looking at the same object until your right eyepiece is in focus.
8. The binoculars should now be set for the differences in strenght of your eyes and you can use the middle focus control as normal.

Most binoculars have a soft rubber eyepiece that can be folded back for people who wear glasses but I, like most people I know who wear glasses, find it horribly uncomfortable.

This method allows you to set them for yourself and if someone else uses your binoculars you can quickly reset them for you.

Hope this helps...


- Oh yeah, sorry, forgot to mention.. This set up is so you can use them without wearing your glasses.. Much more comfortable!!

Aug 17, 2009 | Swarovski Optik Optics

1 Answer

Differnt focus for each eye?


All binoculars (except some really cheap rubbish) have a different focus for each eye. There are two types. Binoculars that have two individual eyepieces that turn and no center focus wheel. This is common to military, astronomy and binoculars used at sea.

The other is the usual center focus binoculars that have a wheel between the two barrels. They will also allow either the left or right eyepiece to turn to focus for one eye. The reason is that manufacturers take into account that each eye is slightly different.

Jul 04, 2009 | Optics

2 Answers

How to focus my Zeiss 10x40B TP binoculars


Your binoculars are known as the Zeiss Classic or what was once known as the Dialyt. They focus differently from the usual binoculars like those mentioned. The rear wheel is to focus both binocular barrels while using them. The front focus wheel is adjust the right eyepiece to suit your right eye. Binocular manufacturers take into account each eye is slightly different. To focus the Dialyt...First close your right eye and turn the rear wheel until the image is sharp in the left barrel. Leave the focus wheel alone. Now close left eye and adjust the front wheel until the image is sharp for your right eye. The image should now be clear and in focus for both eyes. It should not be needed to use the front wheel from now on. The rear wheel is what you will use to change the focus from near to far objects.

May 31, 2009 | Zeiss Classic B/GA 524013 Binocular

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