Question about Celestron NexStar 114GT (269 x 114mm) Telescope

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When viewing venus or other stars there a black spot in the center of the object. It appears to be the 2nd mirror refleting to the main miror. what have I done incorrect?

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You are NOT in focus. Turn the focus knob a little until you see a perfect "disk" for the planet. Stars are always POINTS of light, with a telescope or without a telescope.

Posted on Aug 28, 2010

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1 Answer

When using telescope for the first time (looking at venus) it would not focus, also the cross at the front of the tube was most prominent.


Do stars appear as small pinpoints in your scope? If not then it sounds like you have not adjusted the focus properly. I recommend you take your telescope outside in the daytime and point it toward a building or tree or hilltop that is somewhat distant from you. The exact distance is not important, but it should a block or more.

With the telescope pointed at the distant object, focus the telescope until the object is sharp and clear. The object might appear upside down -- that's normal for many astronomical telescopes. When you have achieved a sharp focus, leave the focus control alone until you are outside at night under the stars.

The focus should now be fairly close for viewing stars and planets. Small adjustments of the focus control may still be necessary for the sharpest view.

Venus is sometimes a difficult object. It is often fairly low in the sky where the atmosphere is most likely to blur the view. Find a bright star and focus it to a pinpoint, then swing your scope toward Venus.

- Jeff

Dec 27, 2016 | Celestron Optics

1 Answer

Why can I not see the difference from the sky and a star even when I allign my laser well?


It sounds like you have not adjusted the focus properly. I recommend you take your telescope outside in the daytime and point it toward a building or tree or hilltop that is somewhat distant from you. The exact distance is not important, but it should a block or more.

With the telescope pointed at the distant object, focus the telescope until the object is sharp and clear. The object might appear upside down -- that's normal for many astronomical telescopes. When you have achieved a sharp focus, leave the focus control alone until you are outside at night under the stars.

The focus should now be fairly close for viewing stars and planets. Small adjustments of the focus control may still be necessary for the sharpest view.

- Jeff

Jun 08, 2014 | Celestron NexStar 4 SE Telescope

1 Answer

I just received New Star 4SE. In Iraq with the army and cannot see anything thru the view finder. Batteries are in and hand control functions. Caps are off. Scope will adjust with hand controller


First you must line up the small finder scope with the main tuibe--

Point the scope at a distant object like the top of a telephone pole. Center the top in the eyepiece of the main scope-- then without moving the scope center the red dot on the same exact spot on the telephone pole.

Also practice focusing on a distant object during the day time-- use the eyepiece with the largest number written on it and DO NOT use the 2x barlow if you have one. Turn the fopcus knob slowly until the object comes to focus.

www.telescopeman.org
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Jul 05, 2011 | Celestron NexStar 4 SE Telescope

1 Answer

I got an inphase telescope for a present secondhand. There are no instructions and I have never used one before, could you advise me please?


The bit of information I can find on this model tells me this scope is probably a Newtonian reflector Telescope.


The following is the most basic steps I can think of to get you in the driver's seat.. by doing a few simple internet searches in regards to astronomy.. you should be able to greatly expand on my few simple tips.


The primary mirror is at the bottom.. the heavy end.. of the tube... if you can see screws holding it in place... resist the urge to "tighten them up".. doing so will probably misalign the mirror.


You should have a small finder scope mounted on the side


Near the finder scope will be the eyepiece/holder with focuser.. all this should be closer to the skyward end of the scope than the earth end of the scope.. so to speak.


As you peer into the eyepiece you are basically looking at a right angle to the primary mirror into a smaller secondary mirror which in turn is reflecting the image of the primary (bottom) mirror. By adding various eyepieces with different magnification factors you are enlarging that image.


Most folks don't realize how bad a typical looking glass mirror is..but if you look really close at the old bathroom mirror.. you will see how much the glass distorts the image reflected on the silver coating.


Which is why your telescopes mirror has a top coating of silver on the glass.. not behind the glass..


To get started..

I suggest doing all of the following things during daylight hours or near dusk on a clear nite so you can see what you are doing.. to get familiar with the scope.


Using the lowest powered eyepiece you have.. once inserted into the focuser .. aim the telescope at an object a few hundred yards away and attempt to focus..


Remember that everything will be upside down.. looking at the moon, planets and stars..it won't really matter.


Once you have managed to point and focus easily.. you can align your finder scope.. again.. using a fixed terrestrial target


Aim the scope at this object.. the further away the object is.. the better.. get the object as close to center as possible.. slightly increase the magnification if you have a stronger eyepiece.. if not.. proceed.


Fix the scopes position by tightening any set screws on the mount.


Check the position of the spotted object again ..make adjustments until you have the object centered.


Look through the finder scope.. adjust the mount screws until the object is centered in the crosshairs..


Check all settings.. your done.


Start out looking at the brightest objects in the nite sky using the lowest magnification..


Once you become familiar with how to find/spot and focus on simple bright objects.. like the moon and perhaps Jupiter... you can read various articles at websites such as Sky and Telescope to learn how to properly align your scope with the polar (north) star.. of course this depends on the type of mount.. and drive if any... Or simply enjoy point and look backyard astronomy.. some of my most fun star gazing has been using bincoulars.. a star chart.. and a lounge chair.


Remember to keep it simple at first.. be ready to dress warm.. and take your time.. your eyes will need almost 30 minutes to really adjust to nite vision..in this cooler weather it helps to let the scope cool down for a while outside (covered) to keep things aligned properly.. of course the darker it is the better the view..


Even inexpensive scopes can give a lot of satisfaction to a point... especially if it's your first..


Good luck!


Washoe

Jan 30, 2011 | Optics

1 Answer

When i view a star or small object through my reflecting telescope i can see the reflecting mirror in front of the image. this does not happen when viewing the moon.


You may need to realign the mirrors and the view piece. You can look at the mirror from the front and your eyeball should ne centered.

Aug 28, 2009 | Optics

1 Answer

Want to see images right side up


You do not need an erecting prism to view objects at night. These are used if you wish to view terrestrial objects since it turns them right side up.

If you have a reflecting telescope (it uses mirrors) it's normal to not use an erecting prism or as they are also known as star diagonals. Objects will appear inverted and that's normal. A refracting telescope (no mirrors, just lenses) will also invert the image but it is quite often used with a star diagonal to make it easier to view. There are many other types of telescopes that use a combination of mirrors and lenses.

I hope this helps.

-jodair

Mar 29, 2009 | Optics

1 Answer

Obscured view through telescope


You can slow down dew forming on the mirror by NOT pointing the telescope toward the sky during cool-down-- just leave it parallel to the ground. Same goes for your eyepieces -- leave them covered, or inside a case.

Dec 26, 2008 | Celestron AstroMaster 130EQ Telescope

2 Answers

Black spot in the center of the image viewed in telescope


If this is a Newtonian reflector or a catadioptric scope (Schmidt Cassegrain or Maksutov) you may be trying to use it at too low of a magnification. Your magnification needs to be high enough that the exit pupil is less than 5 mm; to figure this divide the focal length of the eyepiece by the f-ratio of the optical tube. If this quotient is 5 mm or more the black spot you are seeing is the shadow of the secondary mirror.

Dec 14, 2008 | Celestron NexStar 5 SE (300 x 44.45mm)...

2 Answers

Telescope venture rx9 view blocked


I have this same issue. A star or planet is vlocked by a circle with 3 prongs - like the mirror holder in the tube.

Jun 13, 2008 | Bushnell 675x5 EQ Reflector Telescope

2 Answers

Viewing planets and stars


The problem is you are way out of focus. Turn the focus knob alot, until the star image gets much much smaller. Keep going until it looks like a pin point or a star!. The spider vane and center black dot will disappear. This black dot is actually the secondary diagonal mirror reflection in the primary mirror. The peace signs are the secondary supports. Use the lowest power eye pieces. I would not use the Barlow lens that comes with this scope as it very poor quality. Also, using this high power with this small an aperature (tube diamter) & unstable mount will be very difficult indeed. Invest in some wide angle, long eye relief low power lens. Use these for a while before going to higher powers.

Nov 19, 2007 | Bushnell NorthStar 78-8831 (525 x 76mm)...

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