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I have a Busgnell 10X-30X50 Insta Focul binoculars. There is always a double image at all powers. Can I do anythingabout it.

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

  • 112 Answers

SOURCE: Bushnell 10 - 30X50 adjustment

on some models the center focus control is located on the center hinge,it should be flat,and not hard to find,if there is no center wheel this is where it should be...good luck...larry@reichinstruments.com

Posted on Nov 27, 2008

  • 112 Answers

SOURCE: bushnell binoculars /double image

they have to be aligned if you want mail them to me for an estimate..larry@reichinstruments.com

Posted on Apr 22, 2009

  • 7 Answers

SOURCE: mis-alignement between eyepieces

Up close to the eyepieces around the barrels are small screws that you can use to "collaminate" your binocs. The screws aren't meant to be accessed by the owner and most manufacturers cover them up with the material that surrounds the binocs. Of course the binocs in their current state are useless anyhow, so I wouldn't hesitate to peel up the material to look for the screws. If you do it carefully, you can reseat the material anyhow. Then once you locate the small screws, put the binocs on a stand or a table outside. Focus on something far away using one eye. Then using both eyes, you adjust the screw on the other eyepiece while looking through the binocs. Adjust until you get a single image. You can use loctite, or nail polish to "glue" the screw in the final position if it is really loose.

Posted on May 09, 2009

  • 7 Answers

SOURCE: I am suddenly seeing double images theough my binoculars.

Up close to the eyepieces around the barrels are small screws that you can use to "collaminate" your binocs. The screws aren't meant to be accessed by the owner and most manufacturers cover them up with the material that surrounds the binocs. Of course the binocs in their current state are useless anyhow, so I wouldn't hesitate to peel up the material to look for the screws. If you do it carefully, you can reseat the material anyhow. Then once you locate the small screws, put the binocs on a stand or a table outside. Focus on something far away using one eye. Then using both eyes, you adjust the screw on the other eyepiece while looking through the binocs. Adjust until you get a single image. You can use loctite, or nail polish to "glue" the screw in the final position if it is really loose.

Posted on May 09, 2009

Obertelli
  • 3006 Answers

SOURCE: double vision

The yoke which connects the eyepieces and keeps them aligned as the focus changes is damaged. If you can easily move one eyepiece back and forth with respect to the other then the yoke has broken, if not then it's bent, probably cracked and waiting to break.This is easily the most common fault on most binoculars, and it's always uneconomic to repair on budget brands such as Bushnell.

If bent, the yoke *might* be able to be straightened, but it will be weakened and the alignment afterwards will rarely be spot-on. If broken, then the yoke must be replaced professionally but the repair will cost more than replacing the binoculars with new. In any case, it's unlikely that Bushnell even list the spare part for it. The break cannot be simply glued: the contact area is too small to carry the loads it has to carry, and you also usually find that the yoke bent before breaking anyway so you then have all the same problems as you do with a bent yoke.

The fragile nature of the yoke is why binoculars must always be inserted into their case with the objective lenses facing down; this avoids shock loads on the delicate yoke assembly.

I hope that you've found my posting to be of use and in return ask only that you take a moment to rate my answer.

Posted on Feb 13, 2010

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I see double image unless I take the lens as close as the binoculars can go


thats how binoculars are. Yours in this case is really strong. the closer you are to something, looking at it, the more magiflyed you going to be. try view things far a distance, really far away. no more double right?
Everything you need to know to become an expert:
on this website: http://www.chuckhawks.com/binocular_basics.htm
It is surprising how many people do not know how to focus binoculars correctly. There are two common focusing systems used in binoculars.
The first is individual eyepiece focus. This system is simple to understand, and easy to manufacture. It also lends itself well to sealed optical tubes, and thus is usually the focusing system used for waterproof binoculars. Individual eyepiece focus means that to focus the binoculars to your eyes, you simply focus the left eyepiece to your left eye and the right eyepiece to your right eye. There is no centrally located focusing mechanism. It is done like this. Look at something in the distance. Close the right eye (or cover the front of the right binocular), and focus the left eyepiece to your left eye. Close the left eye (or cover the front of the left binocular), and focus the right eyepiece to your right eye. You are finished, until you need to look at something at a different distance, in which case you need to repeat the process.
Because individual eyepiece focus is time-consuming, center focus is more common. Unfortunately, very few people understand how to correctly use center focus binoculars. Here is how it is done. Aim your binoculars at something in the distance. Close the right eye (or cover the front of the right tube), and focus the left side of the binocular to your left eye using the center focus control, which is concentric with the pivot shaft between the binoculars. (Note: the left eyepiece itself does not focus on center focus binoculars.) Next, close your left eye (or cover the front of the left tube), and focus the right eyepiece to your right eye. DO NOT touch the center focus control while you are focusing the right eyepiece to your right eye. Now you are finished. What you have just done is adjust the binoculars for your individual eyes. (Practically everybody's left and right eyes are different.) From now on, you only need to adjust the center focus control when you look at things at different distances. Center focus is faster and easier to use than individual eyepiece focus, once you have initially set the binoculars for your eyes.
Binoculars are commonly described by using a pair of numbers, as in "7x50" or "8x25." The first of these numbers refers to the magnification offered by the binocular. Magnification is why most people buy a pair of binoculars. In the examples above, "7x" means the binocular makes whatever you look at appear seven times closer than it does to the unaided human eye. "8x" means the binocular makes whatever you look at eight times closer than the unaided human eye. "10x" makes things look ten times closer, and so on. The first number used to describe binoculars always refers to their magnification. Common binocular magnifications are 6x, 7x, 8x, 9x, and 10x.
There are also variable power (zoom) binoculars, such as 7-21x50. These almost always perform much better at the low power setting than they do at the higher settings. This is natural, since the front objective cannot enlarge to let in more light as the power is increased, so the view gets dimmer. At 7x, the 50mm front objective provides a 7.1mm exit pupil, but at 21x, the same front objective provides only a 2.38mm exit pupil. Also, the optical quality of a zoom binocular at any given power is inferior to that of a fixed power binocular of that power. In general, zoom binoculars are not the bargain they seem to be.
Remember that everything (including movement) is magnified when you look through a pair of binoculars, especially your own shakes and tremors. So the higher the power, the harder it seems to hold the binoculars steady. 6, 7, or 8 power binoculars are easier for most people, even those with very steady hands, to hold reasonably still. The higher powers sound like a good deal, but often result in jiggly, blurred views. This is why 7x binoculars are chosen by so many experts, including the military.
Power affects brightness. Other things being equal, the higher the power, the dimmer the view. And power also affects the field of view of the binoculars. Again, everything being equal, the higher the power, the smaller the field of view. So, as you can see, power must be balanced against other desirable characteristics when choosing binoculars.

May 09, 2011 | Bushnell 240842 Binocular

1 Answer

My grandson dropped the binoculars and now I see double. How can I fix this? These worked great until this happened. I see the screws on either side of the eyepieces but don't know if I am supposed to use...


Hello. When the binocs were dropped one of the lenses popped out of it's retaining frame. If this is an old set you can open it up and see what you can do. However, my recommendation is to call Tasco Customer Service at: (800) 423-3537. Opening it up will void any warranty and introduce dust into the interior which will appear and annoy you. Joe

Apr 14, 2010 | Tasco Futura LE 14-103050-1 (10-30x50)...

1 Answer

Need new eye cups for Bushnell Banner 7 X 35 Insta-focus - 25 years old


call customer service at 800-423-3537 pressing option 1. you will need to send this into repair to procure the parts you need.

Sep 29, 2009 | Bushnell "Insta-Focus" Binoculars

1 Answer

See two images at higher power.


Your binoculars are out of collimation. That means that the optical path needs to be aligned. Binoculars are designed so that the focus point of each barrel is the same over long and as short as possible distances. Binoculars that are properly aligned will still show a double image if you attempt to focus at something close that is too close for the models design. However this is not the same for long distances. The image at a long distance must not be doubled.

If they are under warranty and you haven't damaged them by dropping etc send them for repair to the manufacturer or ask the retailer where to send them.

If you are going to pay to have them fixed get a quote first. Binoculars that are of the zoom variety are not well thought of among binocular officionados as the quality of image degrades at higher magnification. For the price of repair you may be able to source a higher quality non zoom binocular.

Jul 20, 2009 | Sharper Image Spion (AR001)

2 Answers

Unable to focus my Bushnell 7x35 insta-vision binoculars


insta-vision bino's are self focusing no adjustments.

Jun 05, 2009 | Bushnell "Insta-Focus" Binoculars

1 Answer

Image appears double and slighly off when viewing


I was having a double vision problem with my Barska 10-30X50 zoom, 195FT/100YDS binoculars. One image was always higher than the other. This was tolerable at low zoom, but was further aggravated the more I zoomed in. I found that I could grasp both barrels and twist them in opposite directions (one side up, the other side down) and force the two images to merge--but that was a strain and an unpleasant viewing experience. As an experiment, while looking through the binoculars, I grasped the far end of the right barrel and twisted it on its axis. Nothing happened at first, but after a certain amount of resistance it began to rotate independently of the body. Lo and behold, this shifted the barrel's axis, and the image for that eye moved vertically! I turned it until the two images merged, and now I'm thrilled to say that the problem is solved! I don't have a clue if this would work on any other brand or model, but it's worth a try!

Apr 06, 2009 | Tasco Sonoma 16-840WA-1 (8x40MM) Binocular

1 Answer

Insta-Focus focusing problem


first open and close the binoculars untill they fit you eye width,now adjust left eye with the flat section located on the center hinge,now turn right eyepiece till clear. note: once you have adjusted right eyepiece you only have to leave it in that position in order to focus from near and far.........good luck......larry@reichinstruments.com

Nov 24, 2008 | Bushnell "Insta-Focus" Binoculars

1 Answer

Bushnell 10 - 30X50 adjustment


on some models the center focus control is located on the center hinge,it should be flat,and not hard to find,if there is no center wheel this is where it should be...good luck...larry@reichinstruments.com

Nov 19, 2008 | Optics

1 Answer

Double image


The distance between the centers of the eyepieces of your binocular must be the same as the distance between your pupils. This distance is adjusted as follows: 1. Focus on a distant object. 2. Pivot the two halves of your binocular farther or closer apart until you can see a single unobstructed, circular field of view. Make sure to focus on a distant object when you do this because when you focus on a close object you always see two slightly overlapping circular fields. Your binocular may have a scale on the top, between the eyepieces, to help you remember this setting.

Aug 03, 2007 | Bushnell 10 x 42mm Sportsman Binoculars

1 Answer

Double vision


The distance between the centers of the eyepieces of your binocular must be the same as the distance between your pupils. This distance is adjusted as follows: 1. Focus on a distant object. 2. Pivot the two halves of your binocular farther or closer apart until you can see a single unobstructed, circular field of view. Make sure to focus on a distant object when you do this because when you focus on a close object you always see two slightly overlapping circular fields. Your binocular may have a scale on the top, between the eyepieces, to help you remember this setting.

Jul 03, 2007 | Bushnell Powerview - Compact 10 x 25...

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