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Analog to digital receiver has static noise from audio

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Analog isnt perfect basically its saying were back in the stone age with poor quality signal try a better antena

Posted on May 07, 2008

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How do I hook up a tv to a Sony D311 receiver


The Sony STR-D311 only has analog audio inputs. If your TV has an analog audio output, use the appropriate RCA cable (2 M/M plugs on each end, usually red and white). If your TV has a headphone jack, use a 3.5 mm to RCA adapter. However, if your TV only has digital audio outputs, you will need a digital to analog audio converter, like this: https://www.amazon.com/Digital-Optical-Analog-audio-converter/dp/B004C4WPXA . You will also need the appropriate analog audio and digital audio cables.

The manual for the receiver is on the product support page: https://esupport.sony.com/US/p/model-find.pl?mdl=STRD311 . The direct link to the manual is currently https://docs.sony.com/release//STRD311.PDF .

I hope this helps.

Cindy Wells

Dec 04, 2016 | Sony Str D311 Receiver

1 Answer

Static sound in surround sound


Check your cables ... speaker wires and everything. Are you running Analog or digital source?

Apr 22, 2014 | Audio Players & Recorders

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When watching TV the video will go black for 3 to 4 seconds then come back on. When this happens the audio continues. Some times this happens every 5 to 10 minutes then other times it happens every 2 to...


Try a new HDMI cable. Digital signals don't tolerate static in the line & would result in no video (as opposed to static in the output allowed by analog signals).

Jan 27, 2014 | Marantz SR7002 6.1 Channels Receiver

1 Answer

Need to hook up a Realistic model 31-2000 equalizer to a Yahama receiver.


Be advised that the engagement of any device in a Tape Monitor loop on a late-model Audio/Video Receiver will effectively tie the receiver down to stereo-only analog sound reproduction. I'll explain.


The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop.


In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).


Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.


The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.


EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically converted to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose a STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Monitor as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.


In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? They would NOT be processed. That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Monitor is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that's the way it is. Nature of the digital beast.



Okay, back to the hook-up: Receiver Tape- or VCR Out to the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Amp-, Tape- or Rec-In; Receiver Tape- or VCR In from the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Amp-, Tape- or Rec-Out.



So, to sum up, you can only use the EQ for analog stereo sources. If you actually want to use an analog recording deck you could place it within the typical Equalizer's own Tape Monitor loop(s). Many have two to facilitate equalized dubbing between decks.


[Or you could obtain a dbx Program Route Selector (check eBay, I highly recommend the 400x, of which I have two) and it would, while only using one receiver Tape Loop, allow for three discrete attachment paths for processors and three for tape decks with the added flexibility of front-panel selection of any and all, with the processors being before, after or between the source or tape decks. Plus it has a dedicated facility for an inline dbx Noise Reduction Processor that can also be juggled around via pushbuttons. Pretty neat.]

Jan 17, 2011 | Audio Players & Recorders

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While listening to DVD audio through the Amp, the audio muted with no selection on the remote. The mute light was not lit. Turned the amp off and then back on, the audio returned for 30 seconds, and then...


If I understand you correctly, you're listening to a DVD-A (high resolution audio) through the 5.1 analog inputs.

OTOH, if you're listening to a DTS soundtrack via a digital connection it will produce loud hash noise if played via analog means. You may have digital audio, stereo analog and 5.1 audio cables running from your DVD player to the receiver (I do). Look to see if the digital feed is dropping out. Three should be a light in the receiver to indicate 'digital'. The unit couldc be defaulting to analog stereo in the absence of a good digital bitstream.

Then you might want to look at the DVD player to make sure it isn't malfunctioning.

In this world of ripped portable music and earbuds it's nice to hear someone else appreciates high fidelity on DVD-A. Too bad the retail market for them and SACD died. I found dozens of them on eBay so at least I have a lot to listen to.

Aug 08, 2010 | Kenwood KRF-X9060D Receiver

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Static in speakers


I own this receiver, I assume you refer to the "hiss" rather than actual static.

I've found it seems to be related to temperature/humidity changes especially going from warmer to colder. And it is more pronounced from the analog audio outputs. Here is what I've done to remedy the problem quite effectively and the noise floor is now very very low, inaudible in fact.

Don't turn it off. You don't have to be powering anything with it, just leave it on. It doesn't have a standby mode but leaving it on will help keep it a constant temp. It doesn't produce much heat at all even when playing very loud.
The digital outputs are considerably quieter than the analog outs. I haven't completely remedied the problem with the analog outs.
Use ferrite clamps on the power cord and the analog audio outputs. Three on each helps.

You may notice that if you turn it off for a while, or your room gets cold or humid it gets more pronounced even when the above tips are employed. In this case I've discovered that simply playing it, let it "warm up" for example while movie previews are on at a moderate level, can make it go away.

Mar 22, 2010 | Sony STR-DA3000ES Receiver

1 Answer

Hi i have problems with SOny STR-DE958 and DTS. I use Win7 and optic cable. When i test for DTS my Sony didn`t make any noice. Only work Dolby. I test with normal cables in Multi in all work. And optic...


What's connected to what? And which way are you going? Is a PC part of this scenario (you mention Win7)? Maybe you should start there.

The Sony knows DTS. The PC, who can say?

DTS is a bitstream-audio function and many sources need to be told to send it to their digital outputs because without decoding it will only sound like high volume static noise. The DTS-compatible receiver decodes it to its analog multiple channels. It doesn't suk. Look it up on Wiki.

Feb 10, 2010 | Sony STR-DE598 Receiver

1 Answer

No analog comming out of receiver when optical input is used .


as a rule...in order to get analog audio out of a receiver, it must have an analog input. you could use a digital to analog converter between the tv and stereo or come out of both of your source devices (ps3, cable) with analog to the receiver. good luck

Feb 10, 2010 | Yamaha HTR-5740 Receiver

1 Answer

User hears faint static while on a call. It's not load enough to make it hard to hear the caller, but a noticable crackling/static noise can be heard in the background. happens on every call.


Cell phones transmit the sound as digital data. The data when converted back to analog to listen too CAN have "digitizing noise" which will sound like static.

WORSENING the problem is if there is noise in the background of the person sending the voice and the worst possiblle is to have MUSIC in the background. These both drive the CODEC (the analog conversion system) crazy and will create what you describe. The CODEC is designed to transmit ONLY voice.

Oct 23, 2009 | Motorola Mobility Moto Q

1 Answer

On my walkman model Sony MEGA Bass Walkman SRF-M85v all I receive in static on the tv channels. Is it because of the digital switch?


Yes. The Sony was designed to receive analog TV signals. As of June 12th, the signals are all ATSC (Digital) rather than the old NTSC analog. Dan

Jun 15, 2009 | Sony Audio Players & Recorders

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