Question about Pentax K100D Digital Camera

2 Answers

Indoor picture too dark with flash

When I shoot indoors with flash my Pentax K100D the picture seems a little dark over 20 feet away but it seems to work .

Posted by on

  • Jewdeit May 06, 2008

    When I shoot indoors with flash my Pentax K100D the picture seems a little dark over 20 feet away but it seems to work outside .

  • macrandy Feb 08, 2009

    Mine used to work fine, now all the pictures I take AT THE BASKET GYM are dark. Home and outside seem fine. The gym pictures I took last time I was there worked fine.

×

2 Answers

  • Level 1:

    An expert who has achieved level 1.

    Corporal:

    An expert that has over 10 points.

    Mayor:

    An expert whose answer got voted for 2 times.

    Problem Solver:

    An expert who has answered 5 questions.

  • Contributor
  • 18 Answers

Hello,

I have just started experimenting with my K100D to figure out how to trick the camera into giving me better indoor pictures in exactly this situation.

I haven't perfected it yet, but this is where I currently am . . .

1) Turn on the camera.
2) Pop-up the flash.
3) On the mode dial, turn it to Night mode.
4) In the Menu function, adjust the Flash compensation to -2. This will reduce the power of your flash. (I know, it sounds backwards, but there is a logic to this.)

Here's my thought process . . .

The night mode is supposed to hold the shutter open a little after the flash goes in order to fill in some of the details in the background during dark lighting situations.

Turning down the flash will reduce the chance that the flash will burn-out (over expose) your "closer" subject matter (ie. the people you are trying to photograph.)

I have tried this indoors in my house, and I am really pleased with the results. I haven't tried it in large rooms yet, but would be interested in any feedback on anyone who tries this out.

Take care & Happy Imaging!
Glen
:)

Posted on Jul 26, 2008

  • looking227 Aug 15, 2008

    Hello,

    If you don't want to buy an external (or carry one around), I just saw an attachment that will bounce your built-in flash off the ceiling!

    I didn't know this was available until just now.

    http://www.lightscoop.com

    It attaches to your hotshoe and rests in front of your built-in flash. When the flash fires, it is bounced off a mirror and then the roof, thus diffusing the light for a more even exposure.

    I have to find out where I can pick this puppy up!

    Take care and happing imaging!
    Glen
    :)



×

  • Level 2:

    An expert who has achieved level 2 by getting 100 points

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    Legend:

    An expert who has written 200 answers of more than 400 characters.

  • Expert
  • 480 Answers

Hey Jewdeit,
The built in flash on the K100D has guide # of 52 at iso 200 which does fine for close-up photography and as fill flash outdoors, but is not a powerful enough flash for shooting far away subjects indoors. What you probably should do is purchase an external shoe mounted flash such as the AF540FGZ which has a much higher guide number of 148 at iso 100. When shooting with flash if you are using aperture priority or full manual you can also try opening the aperture to let in more light that the flash put out, but doing this might over expose anything in the foreground.

Sincerely,
Allan
Go Ahead. Use Us.

Posted on May 06, 2008

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

The problem is that u know the sony hdv xr500x when u put it on the picture is very dark we have tried it under light too put but the picture is still dark


Hello
When you look at your pictures are they dark, murky and hard to see? If you took pictures at a wedding, dance recital, theater performance or any indoor event and they came out dark, read on to learn why your pictures are dark, and how to fix this common camera problem.

Many people take pictures of indoor events, only to be unsatisfied with the final outcome of their photos. Although you may have bought the top of the line film or digital camera, there are a few limitations that you need to know about.
To correctly expose your pictures, you camera needs a lot of light. The compact point and shoot varieties adjust for this when you're outside during the daytime, and usually your pictures turn out fine, right? Well, then how come when you take indoor pictures, they sometimes come out too dark? There are two culprits; your zoom function and your flash.
Most compact cameras today offer a zoom function. When I used to work in retail photography sales, the first feature that consumers would ask for is zoom. People love to get close-up pictures without using their feet. Although zoom does bring your subject matter in closer, it also decreases the amount of light that can get into your camera. Essentially, the more you zoom, the less light your camera can receive, and your pictures will be darker.
So, if your taking pictures indoors, in a dark church, gym or other window-less room it is very difficult for your camera to get enough light to properly expose your pictures.
This is when most photographers decide to turn on their flash. The flash on your camera is a great tool to illuminate dark situations that are in close proximity to the camera. Most built-in flash units are designed to allow the light to travel 8-10 feet away in poor quality light and up to 15-20 feet in brighter situations.
What most camera users fail to realize is that although your zoom function is visually bringing you closer to the action, you flash cannot reach that far to illuminate the subject, and your pictures will be dark.
Hope it helps, if so do rate the solution

Dec 21, 2010 | Sony Digital Cameras

Tip

My camera has spots in the picture



The spots are caused by the flash being SO close to the lens. Anyobject that can reflect the flash reflects it right back at the camera.
This is an image problem with most point and shoot digitals. Watch forreflective surfaces and stand at an angle to them. Turn on more lightsin the room before using flash. Most indoor pictures start way too dark.
Stand at a slight angle to the image orperson you are photographing - don't shoot straight on. (I kneel downand shoot up - makes a good shot too.)
If you are shooting toward the sun lit side of an image, shield the lens from direct sunlight with your hand (Keep your hand out of the picture!)
A professional photographer has the flash way away from the lens for a reason...

on Mar 31, 2010 | Digital Cameras

1 Answer

On every picture shooted by my K100D, I am having dark spots on top right and left of the pictures. This indicates, there are some dirty spots on the lens. How to clean this?


Actually, it means you have dust on the sensor if the spots are in the same place on every picture. Google the words "cleaning a DSLR sensor" for instructions with pictures on how to clean it yourself. The sites also list places to obtain the supplies you will need.

Oct 21, 2010 | Pentax K100D Digital Camera

1 Answer

A630 Indoor pictures are too dark in Auto, Flash


try using night mode indoors. otherwise, simply get into setup and go back to factory settings, and use AUTO mode. hope it helps

Oct 07, 2009 | Canon PowerShot A630 Digital Camera

2 Answers

What setting to use while using A PENTAX K100D WITH A ZOOM LEN while shooting indoor sports pics


Tlthough there is an automatic sports setting on the left wheel (see the runner icon)...
You can set the ISO speed to 3200 and do not use the flash (set flash to "Manual".
You maigh use the telephoto lens at 80mm, or so.

This works great!

or use the programmed auto for sports (the runner icon)..

Hope this helps!

Sep 15, 2009 | Digital Cameras

1 Answer

Dark pictures using flash


You could try increasing the exposure level (press AV+/- while rotating the selector wheel to the right) but this will increase the time the shutter is open and increase the possibility of picture blur. Only other thing to do when shooting indoors is to change to a high ISO - 1600 for instance. This reduces the time the shutter is open so working together with the first suggestion you may not notice any difference!

If still too dark, you need a faster lens - you can pickup a 50mm f/1.8 lens quite cheap - this is an excellent indoor lens as the low F number means it lets in lots of light. The fixed focal length means you will have to move around to frame the shot, but they are indispensible for indoor work and a lot cheaper than a f2.8 zoom.

Feb 07, 2009 | Canon EOS 400D / Rebel XTi Digital Camera

3 Answers

Outside picture very dark even with flash / inside better


hI ,
pENTAX K100D DIGITAL CAMERA , TRY TO ADJUST LIGHT EXPOSURE FROM INDOOR TO OUTDOOR.

Dec 11, 2007 | Pentax K100D Digital Camera

1 Answer

Optio s - flash problem in low light


Read the photo data (EXIF) and confirm what setting the flash was in. It may have been set to off by mistake. For close indoor shots I usually don't depend on the Auto setting, just manually force the flash on to get proper lighting. If you use the Auto setting take into consideration the white balance and the type of indoor lighting you are using.

Sep 08, 2005 | Pentax Optio S Digital Camera

Not finding what you are looking for?
Pentax K100D Digital Camera Logo

154 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Pentax Digital Cameras Experts

kakima

Level 3 Expert

96576 Answers

Donald DCruz
Donald DCruz

Level 3 Expert

17129 Answers

halotheracer
halotheracer

Level 2 Expert

68 Answers

Are you a Pentax Digital Camera Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...