Question about Caterpillar Electrical Supplies

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Cat gen set 3306 208/416 volt with a VR3-SE regulator that is blowing the #24 lead fuse. Has a lead # 26 on regulator which is not on connection diagram of se regulators, only on pm regulators.All windings test good ohm and ground wise. can't figure out why fuse blows with no load even on the unit.

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6ya6ya
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SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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SOURCE: saab 9-5 se, heater problem

yes the problem can be solved, costly repair the arm on the control link is broken common problem the whole dash have to come a part I used to work at SAAB as a service writer and just getting a tech on the side was to costly for me and we use to charge customer any where from $1200-$1800, there also could be a lease expensive repair some time there is this part which looks like a toilet paper roll which breaks it could be replace for less money, I'm no mechanic but I'm pretty sure you can find one to take a look at it, and if your economy is any thing like ours it should be no problem finding one and I'm assuming you are not American from the words petrol and wind screen.

Posted on Mar 05, 2009

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SOURCE: VW Polo 2000 1.4 16V Blowing fuse for Central locking / windows

car electrics are a nightmare. the car lights up when a door is open i presume. and by bypassing the central locking. the electric computer says there is a fault. and will not start. that i think is programed in. best thing to do is. go to phone VW dealer ask about diagnostic test without repair. about £35 then fix it yourself. they garentee it right I think. the dealers have come into line better with that kind of thing phone and ask anyway.

Posted on Mar 26, 2009

mydogisk
  • 50 Answers

SOURCE: No 120 or 220 volts out put on portablegenerator motor runs good.

You should find out which wires are you excitation fields and flash them with a 9volt battery. That should make 120 volts

Posted on Apr 10, 2009

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SOURCE: Need a diagram for this overcomplicated machine

Will probably bin it. Long experience shows that the ONLY alternators worth having are the British made Newage-Markon which IMHO are superior to both Sawafuji and Mecc-Alte. Voltage Dependent Resistors (VDRs) also known as Transorbs are essential if long term reliability is desired from small gensets. Haverhill Generators get around the voltage spike problem another way - 8 microfarads across the output but one Haverhill generator that I repaired had vibrated apart its control box wiring and fan. These little machines all leave a lot to be desired unfortunately and seem to give endless trouble.

Posted on Jul 31, 2009

czaa
  • 4536 Answers

SOURCE: Voltage Regulator Problem?

u want to chec alternator as well-ther r test u can do so buy a clymer manual which r very detailed-iv seen hd books in library sec 629

Posted on Aug 19, 2009

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Kawasaki zx12 not charging . I cut out plugs from stator to rectifier and soldered them. after doing this , when I plug in rectifiers other plug to main circuit , it blows main fuse at the battery.


Hi, Wayne the following is a comprehensive charging system test that I found on a Rider Groups website. 1. Battery Test: The battery needs to be a fully charged battery that has been load tested to ensure proper readings. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Most places like Auto Zone, Advance Auto, and Pep Boys will charge and test motorcycle batteries for free. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
2. Charging System Voltage Test: Start motorcycle, Measure DC Volts across the battery terminals (you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts).
3. Check Connections/Wires: Inspect the regulator/stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection/corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolate the Stator & Rotor If AC Output test Fails and Resistance Check, and Stator IB Test Pass then Rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
AC Output Check:
Unplug the regulator plug from the stator
Start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts.
Probe both stator wires with your meter lead
The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. (Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification)
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
Stator Resistance Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. (Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual for specification)
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
Stator IB test or Ground Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
If there is continuity to ground your stator is shorted to ground.
5. Regulator Test: Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
Identifying Wires:
Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).
Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test: This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire.
The reading should be Infinite.
With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires.
The reading should be Infinite.
Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
Ground AC output 1 Voltage
Ground AC output 2 Voltage
AC output 1 Ground ?
AC output 2 Ground ?
Before diagnosing your blown fuse issue check the bottom of your seat if it's metal and comes in close proximity to the positive battery post you need to take the necessary steps to ensure there is no contact (electrical tape, thick rubber insulation, hammer a dent in the seat bottom etc.) also you are going to need a wiring from your service manual a test light, an ohmmeter and plenty of extra fuses. If you turn on your ignition switch and immediately blow a fuse you have a hard/dead short and is usually easy to find. With a test light connected to the hot side of the blown fuse holder start stabbing the wire/s that leads away from the fuse holder and towards the ignition switch, you test light will illuminate validating the short. When the test light fails to illuminate you have passed the short and need to back up until the test light illuminates, then look in the immediate area for the short.
If you driving down the road for 30 minutes or 15 miles and blow a fuse you have soft/flying short and may take some time and patience to find.
If the main fuse/circuit breaker constantly blows/trips while riding you probably have a faulty battery terminal connection. Check battery terminals for damage or corrosion, check battery cables at "BOTH" ends for loose, corroded, or broken connectors, "INSIDE" and outside the cable harness, perform connector wiggle test and check cables with an ohmmeter if necessary. Any other fuses that constantly keep blowing while riding are usually caused by a loose or corroded ground wire in the circuit, which means you have to check, inspect, test each and everyone with and ohm meter set on a low ohm scale 100 ohms or less . Simply touch one lead to the ground source and the other lead to the battery negative terminal, a reading of zero indicates a clean solid ground. Any number reading or infinity indicates a poor ground and needs to be repaired. Poor or weak grounds require excessive additional amperage to complete the circuit which in turn blows the small amperage fuse. For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
http://www.jetav8r.com/Vision/Stator/fault_finding_by_www.electrosport.com.pdf
charging problem 00 12 ZX12R ZONE com
Kawasaki NINJA ZX 12R Service Manual
OEM Parts for Kawasaki
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Feb 10, 2017 | kawasaki Motorcycles

1 Answer

Check voltage regulator 1995 h.d. softail?


Hi Anonymous, perform the following tests:
1. Fill acid type batteries to proper levels.
2. Charge battery overnight at 1-2 amps you need 12.5 volts or better after charging.
3. Hook up battery positive cable, then with your multimeter on the milliamp scale connect one lead to the negative battery post and the other lead to the ground cable. Meter should read 3 milliamps or less, 10 milliamps with a radio, 15 milliamps with radio and CB. If your meter reads higher you need to isolate the circuit by pulling fuses and circuit breakers one at a time and observe meter for drop in aprerage then get out your test light and track down the short in that circuit.
3. Make sure all connections are clean and tight especially the negative cable at both ends.
4. Hook up volt meter to battery and start engine, if meter falls below 9.5 v while cranking replace battery.
5. With engine running at 3600 RPM battery should read 14.3-14.7 volts if not continue tests.
6. Unplug voltage regulator from alternator at crankcase by front of primary cover.
7. To test voltage regulator go to: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F8EjV0IjW9Q
8. With ohm meter, one lead grounded, touch alternator pin meter should read infinity, if not replace stator.
9. With ohm meter, both leads touching alternator pins meter should read 0.1 to 0.2 ohms on 1989 and later models. 0.2 to 0.4 ohms 1988 and earlier models, if not replace stator.
10. With volt meter set on AC scale, both leads touching alternator pins meter should read
16 to 20 volts AC for every 1000 RPM'S 1989 and later and 19 to 26 volts AC for every 1000 RPMS. If not replace rotor.
17. For a free wiring diagram please visit the website below and good luck.
Harley Davidson Wiring Diagrams and Schematics

Sep 18, 2013 | Harley Davidson FLHR-FLHRI Road king...

1 Answer

Voltage regulator stator


Hi Anonymous, perform the following tests:
1. Fill acid type batteries to proper levels.
2. Charge battery overnight at 1-2 amps you need 12.5 volts or better after charging.
3. Hook up battery positive cable, then with your multimeter on the milliamp scale connect one lead to the negative battery post and the other lead to the ground cable. Meter should read 3 milliamps or less, 10 milliamps with a radio, 15 milliamps with radio and CB. If your meter reads higher you need to isolate the circuit by pulling fuses and circuit breakers one at a time and observe meter for drop in aprerage then get out your test light and track down the short in that circuit.
3. Make sure all connections are clean and tight especially the negative cable at both ends.
4. Hook up volt meter to battery and start engine, if meter falls below 9.5 v while cranking replace battery.
5. With engine running at 3600 RPM battery should read 14.3-14.7 volts if not continue tests.
6. Unplug voltage regulator from alternator at crankcase by front of primary cover.
7. To test voltage regulator go to: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F8EjV0IjW9Q
8. With ohm meter, one lead grounded, touch alternator pin meter should read infinity, if not replace stator.
9. With ohm meter, both leads touching alternator pins meter should read 0.1 to 0.2 ohms on 1989 and later models. 0.2 to 0.4 ohms 1988 and earlier models, if not replace stator.
10. With volt meter set on AC scale, both leads touching alternator pins meter should read
16 to 20 volts AC for every 1000 RPM'S 1989 and later and 19 to 26 volts AC for every 1000 RPMS. If not replace rotor.
17. For a free wiring diagram please visit the website below and good luck.
Harley Davidson Wiring Diagrams and Schematics

May 08, 2013 | 2006 Harley Davidson XL 1200 C Sportster...

1 Answer

1985 gl1200 overcharging at idle will climb to16 volts, new battery


Hi, Anonymous before testing any electrical component in the Charging System it is "IMPERATIVE" that you have a fully charged battery of 12.5 volts or more and be able to pass a proper "LOAD" test if necessary, you may have a preliminary reading of 12.5 volts or more but little or zero amperage, the battery is faulty and must be replaced. AGM type batteries fall into this scenario more so than lead acid batteries.
1. Battery Test:
The battery needs to be a fully charged and load tested to ensure proper readings, connections need to be clean and tight. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
2. Charging System Voltage Test:
Start motorcycle, measure DC volts across the battery terminals you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts.
3. Connections and wires:
Inspect the regulator stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolates the Stator & Rotor. If AC output and resistance test fail and stator test passes then the rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
5. AC Output Check:
Unplug the regulator plug from the stator start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts. Probe both stator wires with your meter lead. The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
Stator Resistance Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale. Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. Reading will vary depending on the system, check the service manual for specifications.
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
Stator Ground Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
If there is continuity your stator is shorted to ground and must be replaced.
5. Regulator Test:
Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
Identifying Wires:
Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).
Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test:
This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire. The reading should be Infinite. With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires. The reading should be Infinite.
Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
Ground AC output 1 Voltage
Ground AC output 2 Voltage
AC output 1 Ground ?
AC output 2 Ground ?
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
85 ltd Goldwing is charging at 16 volts
HOW TO CHECK YOUR CHARGING SYSTEM and CHANGING the STATOR and REGULATOR...
Honda GL1200D Shop Manual
http://www.partsfish.com/page/oem-parts-for-honda
Honda GL1200 1986 Owner Manual

Apr 14, 2013 | 1985 Honda GL 1200 Ltd. Ed. - SE-i Gold...

1 Answer

03 wr 250 is blowing light bulbs


Hi, Dean the following is a comprehensive charging system test that I found on a Rider Groups website 1. Battery Test: The battery needs to be a fully charged battery that has been load tested to ensure proper readings. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Most places like Auto Zone, Advance Auto, and Pep Boys will charge and test motorcycle batteries for free. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
2. Charging System Voltage Test: Start motorcycle, Measure DC Volts across the battery terminals (you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts).
3. Check Connections/Wires: Inspect the regulator/stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection/corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolate the stator & Rotor, If AC Output test Fails and Resistance Check, and Stator IB Test Pass then Rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
AC Output Check:
Unplug the regulator plug from the stator
Start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts.
Probe both stator wires with your meter leads.
The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. (Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification)
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
Stator Resistance Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. (Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual for specification)
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
Stator IB test or Ground Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
If there is continuity to ground your stator is shorted to ground.
5. Regulator Test: Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
Identifying Wires:
Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).
Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test: This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire.
The reading should be Infinite.
With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires.
The reading should be Infinite.
Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
Ground AC output 1 Voltage
Ground AC output 2 Voltage
AC output 1 Ground ?
AC output 2 Ground ?
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the links below. Good luck and have a nice day.
2004 wr250f blowing bulbs
03 WR450 lights blowing
YAMAHA WR250F Owner Service Manual
OEM parts for Yamaha
http://mybikemanuals.com/yamaha/yamaha-wr-owners-manuals

Nov 08, 2012 | 2003 Yamaha WR 250 F

1 Answer

1995 Honda GL 1500 SE Gold Wing alternator test


Hi, Anonymous before testing any electrical component in the Charging System it is "IMPERATIVE" that you have a fully charged battery of 12.5 volts or more and be able to pass a proper "LOAD" test if necessary, you may have a preliminary reading of 12.5 volts or more but little or zero amperage, the battery is faulty and must be replaced. AGM type batteries fall into this scenario more so than lead acid batteries.
1. Battery Test:
The battery needs to be a fully charged and load tested to ensure proper readings, connections need to be clean and tight. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
2. Charging System Voltage Test:
Start motorcycle, measure DC volts across the battery terminals you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts.
3. Connections and wires:
Inspect the regulator stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolates the Stator & Rotor. If AC output and resistance test fail and stator test passes then the rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
5. AC Output Check:
Unplug the regulator plug from the stator start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts. Probe both stator wires with your meter lead. The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
Stator Resistance Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale. Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. Reading will vary depending on the system, check the service manual for specifications.
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
Stator Ground Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
If there is continuity your stator is shorted to ground and must be replaced.
5. Regulator Test:
Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
Identifying Wires:
Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).
Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test:
This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire. The reading should be Infinite. With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires. The reading should be Infinite.
Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
Ground AC output 1 Voltage
Ground AC output 2 Voltage
AC output 1 Ground ?
AC output 2 Ground ?
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
GL1500 alternator testing procedure
How to Check Your Motorcycle Charging System
Honda GL1500 Service Manual
http://www.partsfish.com/page/oem-parts-for-honda
Honda Goldwing GL1500 SE Owner Manual

Oct 21, 2012 | 1995 Honda GL 1500 SE Gold Wing

1 Answer

I have an 04 thundercat and the charging voltage at the battery is only about 12.2 vdc what voltage should i have coming out of the stator before regulator


Hi, Kenneth the following is a comprehensive charging system test that is guaranteed to the find issue with your system.
1. Battery Test: The battery needs to be a fully charged and load tested to ensure proper readings, connections need to be clean and tight. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
2. Charging System Voltage Test: Start motorcycle, measure DC volts across the battery terminals you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts.
3. Check Connections/Wires: Inspect the regulator/stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection/corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolates the Stator & Rotor. If AC Output test Fails and Resistance Check, and Stator IB Test Pass then Rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
5. AC Output Check:
Unplug the regulator plug from the stator
Start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts.
Probe both stator wires with your meter lead.
The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
Stator Resistance Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual for specification
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
Stator IB test or Ground Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
If there is continuity to ground your stator is shorted to ground.
5. Regulator Test: Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
Identifying Wires:
Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).
Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test: This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire.
The reading should be Infinite.
With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires.
The reading should be Infinite.
Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
Ground AC output 1 Voltage
Ground AC output 2 Voltage
AC output 1 Ground ?
AC output 2 Ground ?
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
http://www.jetav8r.com/Vision/Stator/fault_finding_by_www.electrosport.com.pdf
HOW TO CHECK YOUR CHARGING SYSTEM and CHANGING the STATOR and REGULATOR...
http://www.thundercat.nl/index.php/download/category/2-manuals
OEM parts for Yamaha
YAMAHA YZF600R Owner Manual
YAMAHA YZF600R Owner Manual

Aug 15, 2012 | 2002 Yamaha YZF 600 R thunder cat

1 Answer

Battery won't hold a charge


Hi Rick, perform the following tests:
1. Fill acid type batteries to proper levels.
2. Charge battery overnight at 1-2 amps you need 12.5 volts or better after charging.
3. Hook up battery positive cable, then with your multimeter on the milliamp scale connect one lead to the negative battery post and the other lead to the ground cable. Meter should read 3 milliamps or less, 10 milliamps with a radio, 15 milliamps with radio and CB. If your meter reads higher you need to isolate the circuit by pulling fuses and circuit breakers one at a time and observe meter for drop in aprerage then get out your test light and track down the short in that circuit.
3. Make sure all connections are clean and tight especially the negative cable at "BOTH" ends.
4. Hook up volt meter to battery and start engine, if meter falls below 9.5 v while cranking replace battery.
5. With engine running at 3600 RPM battery should read 14.3-14.7 volts if not continue tests.
6. Unplug voltage regulator from alternator at crankcase by front of primary cover.
7. To test voltage regulator go to: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F8EjV0IjW9Q
8. With ohm meter, one lead grounded, touch alternator pin meter should read infinity, if not replace stator.
9. With ohm meter, both leads touching alternator pins meter should read 0.1 to 0.2 ohms on 1989 and later models. 0.2 to 0.4 ohms 1988 and earlier models, if not replace stator.
10. With volt meter set on AC scale, both leads touching alternator pins meter should read
16 to 20 volts AC for every 1000 RPM'S 1989 and later and 19 to 26 volts AC for every 1000 RPMS. If not replace rotor.
17. For a free wiring diagram please visit the website below. Good luck and have nice day.
Harley Davidson Wiring Diagrams and Schematics

Apr 14, 2012 | 2007 Harley Davidson FXD Dyna Superglide

1 Answer

2004 hd 883 sporter...... battery died, so i used a battery charger with the boost to crack the motor......the fuse blow replace with new fuse.....now nothing..... i turn on the switch the light come on...


Hi Parmoth_oddo, perform the following tests:
1. Fill acid type batteries to proper levels.
2. Charge battery overnight at 1-2 amps you need 12.5 volts or better after charging.
3. Hook up battery positive cable, then with your multimeter on the milliamp scale connect one lead to the negative battery post and the other lead to the ground cable. Meter should read 3 milliamps or less, 10 milliamps with a radio, 15 milliamps with radio and CB. If your meter reads higher you need to isolate the circuit by pulling fuses and circuit breakers one at a time and observe meter for drop in aprerage then get out your test light and track down the short in that circuit.
3. Make sure all connections are clean and tight especially the negative cable at "BOTH" ends.
4. Hook up volt meter to battery and start engine, if meter falls below 9.5 v while cranking replace battery.
5. With engine running at 3600 RPM battery should read 14.3-14.7 volts if not continue tests.
6. Unplug voltage regulator from alternator at crankcase by front of primary cover.
7. To test voltage regulator go to: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F8EjV0IjW9Q
8. With ohm meter, one lead grounded, touch alternator pin meter should read infinity, if not replace stator.
9. With ohm meter, both leads touching alternator pins meter should read 0.1 to 0.2 ohms on 1989 and later models. 0.2 to 0.4 ohms 1988 and earlier models, if not replace stator.
10. With volt meter set on AC scale, both leads touching alternator pins meter should read
16 to 20 volts AC for every 1000 RPM'S 1989 and later and 19 to 26 volts AC for every 1000 RPMS. If not replace rotor.
17. For a free wiring diagram please visit the website below. Good luck and have nice day. Harley Davidson Wiring Diagrams and Schematics

Dec 25, 2010 | 2004 Harley Davidson XL 883C Sportster...

1 Answer

1998 electra glide keeps blowing fuse for light and headlight wont work and volt gauge shows overcharge when i rev engine.


Hi Flattopmike1, perform the following tests:
1. Fill acid type batteries to proper levels.
2. Charge battery overnight at 1-2 amps you need 12.5 volts or better after charging.
3. Hook up battery positive cable, then with your multimeter on the milliamp scale connect one lead to the negative battery post and the other lead to the ground cable. Meter should read 3 milliamps or less, 10 milliamps with a radio, 15 milliamps with radio and CB. If your meter reads higher you need to isolate the circuit by pulling fuses and circuit breakers one at a time and observe meter for drop in aprerage then get out your test light and track down the short in that circuit.
3. Make sure all connections are clean and tight especially the negative cable at "BOTH" ends.
4. Hook up volt meter to battery and start engine, if meter falls below 9.5 v while cranking replace battery.
5. With engine running at 3600 RPM battery should read 14.3-14.7 volts if not continue tests.
6. Unplug voltage regulator from alternator at crankcase by front of primary cover.
7. To test voltage regulator go to: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F8EjV0IjW9Q
8. With ohm meter, one lead grounded, touch alternator pin meter should read infinity, if not replace stator.
9. With ohm meter, both leads touching alternator pins meter should read 0.1 to 0.2 ohms on 1989 and later models. 0.2 to 0.4 ohms 1988 and earlier models, if not replace stator.
10. With volt meter set on AC scale, both leads touching alternator pins meter should read
16 to 20 volts AC for every 1000 RPM'S 1989 and later and 19 to 26 volts AC for every 1000 RPMS. If not replace rotor.
17. For a free wiring diagram please visit the website below. Good luck and have nice day.
Harley Davidson Wiring Diagrams and Schematics

Sep 14, 2010 | Harley Davidson FLHT Electra Glide...

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