Question about Lightolier Ivory Galaxy Slide Dimmer Switch 600w X600-i

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In my electrical box, I have one black, one white and one ground wire coming in. There is a single pole switch in the box now. Black goes to one terminal, white to the other terminal, and the ground to the ground terminal. The single pole dimmer switch I have has two black wires and a ground wire. How do I wire this? Everything I have seen online is a 'middle of the run' version with 2 blacks and 2 whites in the box, but I only have one black, one white and a ground.

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  • i_haddow Aug 26, 2010

    This can be tricky.
    First we need to find out how many wires there are in the box holding the fixture because it could be wired "end of line", or it could be sharing wires with another run.
    If there are only one of each at the fixture the circuit is "sharing" wires elsewhere. This is tough to figure out.
    If there are two or more of each it gets easier because the switch is now "end of line".
    If the switch is "end of line" then the white wire at the switch is acting as black (wrap a piece of black electrical tape around it to remind yourself.

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With just two wires other than the ground in the box, both of which were connected to a single pole switch, one must be the incomming power and the other is connected to the load. You can find out which is which either by opening up the fixture box where you will probably find that it is conneted with two white wires or by very carefully positioning the wires so they each are far from touching anything, turning the power on, and testing to see which is hot.
If the dimmer you have does not require you to know the difference between the hot and load wire, then just connect the white and black wires to the dimmer. As the previous poster said, the white wire should have black tape on it.

Posted on Sep 02, 2010

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Switches are not identified.
Single-pole switches are wired differently than 3-way.
Wire colors are not identified. Some boxes have red and black wires that carry power.
Add a comment and fill out details after studying image and reading information.
I am not there, so you can also add a comment and include in-focus photo of your switches that you posted on Flickr.

Following image shows single-pole switches, with typical black and white wires.
No bare copper ground wire is shown. Ground wires connect to green screw.
http://waterheatertimer.org/images/Single-pole-switches-in-4-g.jpg

So your new switch has 2 brass screws. No white wire connects to single-pole switch. One screw will have 1 black wire that goes to light fixture. The other screw will have 1 or 2 black wires that jumper or connect to the other switches as shown in image.

White wires are usually twisted together and covered with wire nut and pushed to back of box.

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EJ500 is battery operated.
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EJ500 can be used for 3-way switching, so it has extra red wire that is capped off in single pole operation. EJ500 blue wire connects to Load (light,fan, motor)

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http://waterheatertimer.org/Woods-timers-and-manuals.html#59028
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3) Connect 59208 black wire where EJ500 black wire was connected.
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The best way to start is to identify exactly which wires came off old switch.
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