Question about Vivitar (1607225) Telescope

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Looking at the moon with the 50 or 100 magnification on my Vivitar Telescope all I see is a extremely small white dot. I have tried focusing back and forth very slowly to no avail. What is the problem and how do I fix it, I am about ready to throw it in the trash!

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  • 3,186 Answers

Well first thing is you bought a junk telescope. Vivitar, Bushnell, Tasco are all considered toy telescopes.

Sorry-- but it is the truth. Read my TIPS on my profile page. These scopes are NOT suitable for Astronomy. You would have been better buying a pair of 10x50mm binoculars which are almost the same lens size as this scope.

Put the eyepiece with the LOWEST number written on it into the scope. This is your highest magnification. Try the moon again with this eyepiece.

Read this:
http://www.texasastro.org/telescope.php

Posted on Aug 24, 2010

  • 1 more comment 
  • john_32 Aug 25, 2010

    Well I am glad I only paid $10.00 for the piece of junk. I think the trash is the best place for it.

  • Joe Lalumia aka TelescopeMan

    Yes, that's about what it is worth-- $10.00!

    Go and buy these two books --

    Turn Left at Orion, and Nightwatch. Then locate a local Astronomy club and join and attend their meetings and free star parties. You will learn all about telescopes and will even be able to use the member's telescopes. Just Google -- "Astronomy Clubs".

    Clear Skies!

  • Joe Lalumia aka TelescopeMan

    WHY--- did you give me ONE THUMBS UP for a perfectly good answer?

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We cant see anything but black


New telescope users are taken by surprise at the difficulty of just pointing the telescope in the right direction to see anything. The field of view is quite limited, especially if you are using a high power eyepiece. The higher the power of eyepiece on a telescope, the dimmer the image, the more difficult to aim it at any chosen object, and the more difficult to focus. When the scope is not focussed, even if there are stars in the field of view, they will only be faint blurs.

It is best when you are starting out with a telescope to try it with the least powerful eyepiece (the one with the highest number) to begin with, until you become more familiar with how it works. Do NOT use the Barlow lens if one came with the scope.

The finder scope is meant to help you get the main scope lined up on the object you want to view, but it won't be any use in pointing the telescope until you adjust it to precisely line up with the main scope. Telescope manuals recommend that you do this in daylight, by pointing the scope at an object on the horizon and adjusting the finder to match (never point a telescope toward the Sun!). Once you have a tree or mountain peak in the center of the main scope's image, you can then adjust the screws around the finder scope to get the crosshairs (or red dot) centered on the same object. It is very difficult to do this job in the dark, especially as objects in the sky are constantly on the move.

You will find that there is a very wide range of movement in the focus mechanism, because different eyepieces focus at different points, but the actual focus range for any eyepiece will be a small part of the overall range afforded by the focusing mount. It is much easier to familiarise yourself with this in daylight.

At this point you will learn that astronomical telescopes usually show an upside down image. There is a good reason for this- erecting the image needs more bits of glass in the light path, which reduces the amount of light and increases aberrations. Even if this is only slight, astronomers prefer to avoid it, and they don't really care which way up the Moon or Jupiter appear. It is possible to fit an erecting prism or eyepiece to most astronomical telescopes, and some of them come with one, but one wouldn't bother to do this with the small finder scope.

Once you have done the above, you can try the scope at night, on an easy to find bright object like the Moon. Looking at random stars will probably be disappointing, as they don't look different under magnification. You will have to find planets, star clusters or nebula to see anything interesting. You will also find the the object you are looking at swims out of the viewing field, and you must continually move the scope to follow it. This will be more pronounced at higher magnifications. Again, use the least powerful eyepiece. Small scopes are often advertised as having unrealistic powers (300, 500) which can never be practically achieved. You just get dim blurs.

There is an excellent website for beginner telescope users at THIS LINK

Jan 24, 2011 | Vivitar (1607225) Telescope

1 Answer

Just had a konusmotor 500 telescope and have built it to the instructions, but nothing on how to use. only a beginner but how do you increase the size of the object you are looking at,eg the moon looks the...


Are you viewing the moon through the small finder scope on top of the main tube? That is only used for aiming the scope, and has very little magnification. The moon should fill the field of view on even the lowest magnification on the main scope.

A reflector type scope has the eyepiece mount on the side of the main tube, near the top end, pointing into the side of the scope. This mount should have an eyepiece placed in it- use the one with the biggest number to start with (that will have the least magnification). Do NOT use the Barlow lens if one came with the scope. You look into the side of the tube with this type of scope, not along it.

New telescope users are taken by surprise at the difficulty of just pointing the telescope in the right direction to see anything. The field of view is quite limited, especially if you are using a high power eyepiece. The higher the power of eyepiece on a telescope, the dimmer the image, the more difficult to aim it at any chosen object, and the more difficult to focus. When the scope is not focussed, even if there are stars in the field of view, they will only be faint blurs.

The finder scope is meant to help you get the main scope lined up on the object you want to view, but it won't be any use in pointing the telescope until you adjust it to precisely line up with the main scope. Telescope manuals recommend that you do this in daylight, by pointing the scope at an object on the horizon and adjusting the finder to match (never point a telescope toward the Sun!). Once you have a tree or mountain peak in the center of the main scope's image, you can then adjust the screws around the finder scope to get the crosshairs (or red dot) centered on the same object. It is very difficult to do this job in the dark, especially as objects in the sky are constantly on the move.

You will find that there is a very wide range of movement in the focus mechanism, because different eyepieces focus at different points, but the actual focus range for any eyepiece will be a small part of the overall range afforded by the focusing mount. It is much easier to familiarise yourself with this in daylight.

At this point you will learn that astronomical telescopes usually show an upside down image. There is a good reason for this- erecting the image needs more bits of glass in the light path, which reduces the amount of light and increases aberrations. Even if this is only slight, astronomers prefer to avoid it, and they don't really care which way up the Moon or Jupiter appear. It is possible to fit an erecting prism or eyepiece to most astronomical telescopes, and some of them come with one, but one wouldn't bother to do this with the small finder scope.

Once you have done the above, you can try the scope at night, on an easy to find bright object like the Moon. Looking at random stars will probably be disappointing, as they don't look different under magnification. You will have to find planets, star clusters or nebula to see anything interesting. You will also find the the object you are looking at swims out of the viewing field, and you must continually move the scope to follow it. This will be more pronounced at higher magnifications. This scope has a motor to track the scope and keep objects in view, but you will have to get the scope set up for that for it to work correctly. Again, use the least powerful eyepiece to start. Small scopes are often advertised as having unrealistic powers (300, 500) which can never be practically achieved. You just get dim blurs.

There is an excellent website for beginner telescope users at THIS LINK

Jan 22, 2011 | Konusmotor 500 (230 x 114mm) Telescope

1 Answer

I have put my sons telescope together but we cannot see through it at all. what could be the problem?


Looking through a telescope requires some understanding. First, It is an extremely powerful magnifier. So you could be looking next to a star and not see a thing.
So here is the best way to set up the scope for observing.
First, Find the moon as it is the easiest to view.
2nd USE THE SMALL FINDER SCOPE with it's cross hairs (if it has them) to locate the moon. It may have to be adjusted to be accurate itself.
3rd Set up the main section of the telescope with the lowest power magnification possible. Don't use the Barlow lens yet.
4th Make sure there are no lens caps in the wrong places.
After you have set it up so that you can locate the moon with the lowest possible magnification of the main scope. Use it to refine the adjustments on the finder scope (if it's possible).
Happy star finding.
P.S. There are some excellent software programs that help you identify some of the objects in the heavens.
Best,
Mark

Dec 31, 2010 | JCPenney Optics

1 Answer

I have a telescope that does not work at night. It is a 400 power 60mm astronomical refractor telescope and I assumed that you could use it at night. Is this telescope for night & day? thansk


Astronomical telescopes are meant to be used at night, for looking at the sky. Try it first on an easily found object like the Moon, with the lowest magnification eyepiece you have. Finding the focus point is difficult with higher magnifications, and they aren't really practical with a small scope such as this.

Nov 23, 2010 | Cameras

1 Answer

Hi all, I just got my telescope for my bday. I cant see through it ,, to be honest i dont know where to look through. Its too complicated. Can anybody help me with this matter? Thanks


Complicated issues yield to a step-by-step approach.

This kind of telescope uses a curved mirror rather than a lens. The light goes down the tube and is reflected from the magnifying mirror at the bottom, back up the tube and then is deflected to the side by another small mirror. It comes out at a right angle, through an eyepiece near the top of the tube, so you look into that eyepiece as if you were looking at something in the top of the tube.

There is probably a small telescope mounted near the eyepiece at the top of the tube. This is a low power viewer to help you line up the main telescope on an object you want to view, as it is very difficult to find objects at the higher magnification of the main scope. There is probably also a cap over the opening of the tube, to keep out dust and stop small objects falling in. You need to remove this to view, but keep it in place the rest of the time.

It is always best to start with an object that you can find easily, like the moon, or during daylight with a tree on the far horizon. Use your lowest magnification eyepiece at first. Until you find the right focus adjustment, all you will see will be a blur. It is easier to focus with the lower magnification eyepieces.

NEVER point any telescope anywhere near the sun.

I got a telescope like this when I was fourteen, and still remember seeing the moons of Jupiter and rings of Saturn.

Nov 15, 2010 | National Geographic 76AZ (525 x 76mm)...

1 Answer

I have a Meade EXT90. A black dot appears in the middle of every object I view (Jupiter, Mars, etc) with the exception of the moon. Any ideas on waht that might be? Thank you.


The black dot means you are way out of focus.

In an ETX90 Mars will always be a TINY disk, except under extreme magnification.

Jupiter is also a small disk but a little bit bigger.

Next time you try for Jupiter focus on the MOONS until they are tiny points of light like little stars.

Also certain eyepieces have this as an unwanted trait. Try another eyepiece -- start with the one with the largest number written on it which will be your LOWEST magnification.

Sep 08, 2010 | Meade ETX-90EC (325 x 90mm) Telescope

1 Answer

How I know the red dot is working ok, is


This is a 60mm telescope not much bigger than a 10x50mm pair of binoculars. Your maximum magnification will be about 100 power. Yes I know they said 200-300 power on the box. This was a lie.

Do not use the 2x barlow. Probably be just too much magnification. Put the eyepiece with the largest number written on it into the telescope; then try the same eyepiece with the 1.5x barlow. That is probably all the magnification the scope can handle.

Stars are always pinpoint light sources, no matter how large the telescope. They are hundreds or thousands of light years away.

The "red dot" should be pointed at exactly the same spot as what is in the eyepiece. Center a bright star in the eyepiece, then without moving the telescope... center the red dot on the star. Now you can use the red dot to POINT the telescope exactly to a sky object.

This web site may also help you:
http://www.cloudynights.com/item.php?item_id=810

Dec 28, 2009 | Konustart 700 (120 x 60mm) Telescope

1 Answer

Can't see anything through the lens?


Put the diagonal into the telescope-- then put the eyepiece that has the LARGEST number written on it. This is the lowest magnification. DO NOT USE THE BARLOW 2x multiplier !!

Take the scope outside during the day time and practice focusing on a distant object. The moon should be the first night time target you try to see.

Jun 02, 2009 | Bushnell Voyager 78-9440 (440 x 12.5mm)...

1 Answer

I Cant see ANYTHING.


Put the lowest magnification eyepiece in the telescope-- it's the one that has the LARGEST number written on it.

During the daytime, go outside and point the telescope toward a distant object at least 100 yards away and practice focusing the telescope--- turn the focus know very slowly. Do this until you learn how to get a clear view of the distant object.

Once you have it focused wait until dark --- don't turn the focus knob. Your first sky object should be the moon or Venus -- which is the BRIGHT "star" in the west after dark....

Dec 29, 2008 | Vivitar (1607225) Telescope

2 Answers

Need a manual for my daughters vivitar telescope.


If your telescope is like the picture you posted it is a refractor style telescope on an ALT AZ mount-- very simple to operate..... up down--- left right.

Use it during the daytime first--- put in the lowest magnification eyepiece-- that's the one with the LARGEST number on it; and try focusing on a distant object to learn how to do this.

Then align the small finder scope crosshairs with the object in the eyepiece. Your first nighttime object should be the moon.

Aug 13, 2008 | Vivitar (1607225) Telescope

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