Question about Intermatic T104 24h 208-277v Mechanical Time Switch

1 Answer

How does one wire the T104. Can the T104 be wired via a 120 volt, 20 Amp Breaker Supply

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  • RariRod Aug 25, 2010

    Thank you for the clarification. It explains why I can switch it on but the timer does not run. I suppose the T103 will also control a 120 volt load?? Yes?
    Again, thank you.

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  • Master
  • 565 Answers

No, the Intermatic T104 requires 240 volts for the clock motor.

The T103 has a 120 volt clock motor and will control a 240 volt load, but requires a 3-wire (with ground) supply cable [as opposed to only a required 2-wire (with ground) for the T104].

The T101 uses a 120 volt clock motor and controls 120 volt loads.
This tip may help:
http://www.fixya.com/support/r3734548-wire_intermatic_t103_t104_timers

Posted on Aug 24, 2010

  • Bob
    Bob Aug 25, 2010

    Thanks for the positive feedback and taking the time to vote.

    Yes, that is correct, the T103 can also be used to control a 120 volt load. The incoming 120 volt HOT is connected to terminal #3 and the NEUTRAL to terminal "A". The 120 volt LOAD is then connected to terminal #4 and the load NEUTRAL to terminal "A". Terminals 1 and 2 are not used.

    A possible solution in your case, IF you have a _dedicated_ line (no other outlets) from the MAIN circuit breaker panel to the timer and available space in the panel would be to change the existing 1-pole 120 circuit breaker to a 2-pole 240 volt breaker. This is easily done by removing the 120 volt circuit breaker and replacing it with a 2-pole 240 volt breaker. (you may have to move some other breakers around to make this happen) Then remove the WHITE wire that was being used as a NEUTRAL for that "old" 120 volt circuit from the NEUTRAL busbar and use it as the other HOT for new 2-pole breaker.

    National Electric Code (NEC) permits this method as long as both ends are marked with black tape or similar means to indicate that the WHITE wire is now a HOT wire.

    Remember, be _certain_ that that line is NOT feeding any other 120 volt loads. Also, don't forget to turn OFF the MAIN circuit breaker to the panel so the busbars won't be hot when you change the breaker.

    Another solution in your case, if you are "stuck" with the T104 would be to change out the timer motor with a 120 volt timer motor (use cat # WG1570): http://www.aplussupply.com/intermatic/ti...

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Tip

How to wire Intermatic T103 and T104 timers


VERY IMPORTANT: Understand that in US residential wiring the WHITE wire is _NOT_ ALWAYS_ the neutral wire. Additionally, prior to 1999 the National Electric Code (NEC) did not require that these white wires be re-identified with black tape or similar means when used for purposes other than neutral. The white wire is sometimes used as a hot, especially when wiring Intermatic T103 and T104 timers.

Also understand that the WHITE neutral wire and the bare (or green) equipment grounding wire are connected together ONLY at the main electric power panel and must _never_be connected together _again_. Once those two wires leave the main electric panel, the WHITE neutral wire must _always_ remain insulated from the bare or green equipment grounding wire. This is very important for safety considerations.

If your wiring is very old and does not have a bare equipment grounding conductor, you _must_ protect the circuit with a GFCI (Ground Fault Circuit Interupter). GFCI wiring is not difficult but is beyond the scope of this post.

DETERMINE WHAT CABLE YOU HAVE:
Usually one will find one of the three following scenarios for the incoming supply cables when wiring a T103 or T104 Intermatic timer:

1...A 120 volt cable with 3 wires: black, white, and bare. The black is LINE (hot), white is neutral and bare is equipment grounding. Black to white is 120 volts. This scenario can be used with the T103, but not the T104.

2...A 240 volt cable with 3 wires: black, white, and bare. The black is LINE(hot), the WHITE is LINE (HOT), and the bare is equipment grounding. Black to white is 240 volts. This scenario is used with the T104 ONLY.

3...A 120/240 volt cable with 4 wires: Black, red, white, and bare. The black and red are (LINE) hot, white is neutral and bare is equipment grounding. Black to red is 240 volts. Black to white is 120 volts. Red to white is 120 volts. This scenario can be used with either the T103 or the T104.

The only difference between the T103 and the T104 is the timer motor voltage rating. The T103 uses a 120 volt timer motor and the T104 uses a 240 volt timer motor. The T103 timer motor is connected to terminal "A" and terminal #3 during manufacturing. The T104 timer motor is connected to terminal #1 and terminal 3# at the factory.

Also, when connecting the bare or green wires to the "GR" terminal, it is best to wirenut the wires together with a pigtail, then connect the pigtail to the "GR" (GRound) terminal, WHICH IS THE GREEN SCREW ON THE LOWER PART OF THE CASE.

WIRING THE TIMER:
The wiring diagram for the T103 is here:
http://www.progressive-growth.com/wiring/T103.pdf
___________________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T103 USING AN INCOMING 120/240 VOLT CABLE WITH 4 WIRES (scenario #3):

Incoming (LINE) wires from 240 volt circuit breaker:
Connect the black (LINE)(hot) wire to terminal #1. Connect the red (LINE) (hot) wire to terminal #3. Connect the white (neutral in this case) wire to terminal "A".
Connect the bare equipment grounding wire to the "GR" terminal, which is the green screw on the case.

Outgoing wires to 240 volt load:
Connect one (hot) wire to terminal #2 and the other (hot) wire to terminal #4. The bare or green wire goes to the "GR" terminal.
___________________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T103 USING AN INCOMING _120_ VOLT CABLE WITH 3 WIRES (scenario #1):

Incoming wires from 120 volt breaker or source:
Black (LINE) to terminal #3. White (neutral) to terminal "A". Bare to the "GR" terminal.

Terminals #1 and #2 are NOT used in this case.

Outgoing wires to 120 volt load(s):
Black(hot) to terminal #4. White(neutral) to terminal "A". Bare to the "GR" terminal.

The wiring diagram for the T104 is here:
http://www.progressive-growth.com/wiring/T104.pdf
______________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T104 USING AN INCOMING 240 VOLT CABLE WITH 3 WIRES (scenario #2):

Incoming (LINE) wires from breaker:
Connect the black (LINE) (hot) wire to terminal #1. Connect the white (LINE) (hot in this case) to terminal #3. Connect the bare wire to the "GR" terminal.

The "A" terminal is _NOT_ used.

Outgoing wires to load:
Connect one (hot) wire to terminal #2 and the other (hot) wire to terminal #4. Connect the bare or green wire to terminal "GR".

The "A" terminal is _NOT_ used.
______________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T104 USING AN INCOMING 240 VOLT CABLE WITH 4 WIRES:
Same as above, except the white wire is not used. Just tape or wirenut it off.
Comment by gotgeek2, posted on Jan 08, 2010ckuzkuz, I'm a licensed master electrician in 2 states with 30 years in the trade. I've installed a lot of Intermatic timers over the years. I wrote this tip because I saw that a lot of folks were having problems wiring them.

on Mar 07, 2010 | Garden

Tip

How to wire Intermatic T103 and T104 timers


These instructions are for USA residential wiring only.

VERY IMPORTANT: Understand that in US residential wiring the WHITE wire is _NOT_ ALWAYS_ the neutral wire. Additionally, prior to 1999 the National Electric Code (NEC) did not require that these white wires be re-identified with black tape or similar means when used for purposes other than neutral. The white wire is sometimes used as a hot, especially when wiring Intermatic T103 and T104 timers.

Also understand that the WHITE neutral wire and the bare (or green) equipment grounding wire are connected together ONLY at the main electric power panel and must _never_be connected together _again_. Once those two wires leave the main electric panel, the WHITE neutral wire must _always_ remain insulated from the bare or green equipment grounding wire. This is very important for safety considerations.

If your wiring is very old and does not have a bare equipment grounding conductor, you _must_ protect the circuit with a GFCI (Ground Fault Circuit Interupter). GFCI wiring is not difficult but is beyond the scope of this post.

DETERMINE WHAT CABLE YOU HAVE:
Usually one will find one of the three following scenarios for the incoming supply cables when wiring a T103 or T104 Intermatic timer:

1...A 120 volt cable with 3 wires: black, white, and bare. The black is LINE (hot), white is neutral and bare is equipment grounding. Black to white is 120 volts. This scenario can be used with the T103, but not the T104.

2...A 240 volt cable with 3 wires: black, white, and bare. The black is LINE(hot), the WHITE is LINE (HOT), and the bare is equipment grounding. Black to white is 240 volts. This scenario is used with the T104 ONLY.

3...A 120/240 volt cable with 4 wires: Black, red, white, and bare. The black and red are (LINE) hot, white is neutral and bare is equipment grounding. Black to red is 240 volts. Black to white is 120 volts. Red to white is 120 volts. This scenario can be used with either the T103 or the T104.

The only difference between the T103 and the T104 is the timer motor voltage rating. The T103 uses a 120 volt timer motor and the T104 uses a 240 volt timer motor. The T103 timer motor is connected to terminal "A" and terminal #3 during manufacturing. The T104 timer motor is connected to terminal #1 and terminal 3# at the factory.

Also, when connecting the bare or green wires to the "GR" terminal, it is best to wirenut the wires together with a pigtail, then connect the pigtail to the "GR" (GRound) terminal, WHICH IS THE GREEN SCREW ON THE LOWER PART OF THE CASE.

WIRING THE TIMER:
The wiring diagram for the T103 is here:
http://www.progressive-growth.com/wiring/T103.pdf
___________________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T103 USING AN INCOMING 120/240 VOLT CABLE WITH 4 WIRES (scenario #3):

Incoming (LINE) wires from 240 volt circuit breaker:
Connect the black (LINE)(hot) wire to terminal #1. Connect the red (LINE) (hot) wire to terminal #3. Connect the white (neutral in this case) wire to terminal "A".
Connect the bare equipment grounding wire to the "GR" terminal, which is the green screw on the case.

Outgoing wires to 240 volt load:
Connect one (hot) wire to terminal #2 and the other (hot) wire to terminal #4. The bare or green wire goes to the "GR" terminal.
___________________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T103 USING AN INCOMING _120_ VOLT CABLE WITH 3 WIRES (scenario #1):

Incoming wires from 120 volt breaker or source:
Black (LINE) to terminal #3. White (neutral) to terminal "A". Bare to the "GR" terminal.

Terminals #1 and #2 are NOT used in this case.

Outgoing wires to 120 volt load(s):
Black(hot) to terminal #4. White(neutral) to terminal "A". Bare to the "GR" terminal.

The wiring diagram for the T104 is here:
http://www.progressive-growth.com/wiring/T104.pdf
______________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T104 USING AN INCOMING 240 VOLT CABLE WITH 3 WIRES (scenario #2):

Incoming (LINE) wires from breaker:
Connect the black (LINE) (hot) wire to terminal #1. Connect the white (LINE) (hot in this case) to terminal #3. Connect the bare wire to the "GR" terminal.

The "A" terminal is _NOT_ used.

Outgoing wires to load:
Connect one (hot) wire to terminal #2 and the other (hot) wire to terminal #4. Connect the bare or green wire to terminal "GR".

The "A" terminal is _NOT_ used.
______________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T104 USING AN INCOMING 240 VOLT CABLE WITH 4 WIRES:
Same as above, except the white wire is not used. Just tape or wirenut it off.

on Dec 28, 2009 | Hardware & Accessories

1 Answer

Pool pump breaker tripping


1) Not likely the timer is problem, unless there was fire or overheating in timer box. Use nose and eyes to inspect for signs of high heat.

2) Eliminate timer as suspect:
Move wires on timer to test if timer relays have gone bad.
Move terminal 4 to terminal 3
Move terminal 2 to terminal 1
http://waterheatertimer.org/How-to-wire-T104-Intermatic-timer.html#T104

3) Check watt rating of Hayward pump, and voltage.
1Hp motor at 240Volt draws 8 amp, and can draw 6 to 8 times that amount when starting. Up to 100 feet, should be at least 12 gauge wire and double-pole 20 amp breaker. Over 100 feet, 10 gauge wire and 30 amp double-pole breaker is best.
http://waterheatertimer.org/Color-codewire.html#motor

4) Intermatic T104 240V timer is rated 40 amps
Can safely handle 1 Hp motor without nearing heat-rating capacity of timer

5) Make sure the motor is wired correctly for 240Volts.
If motor is wired for 120, and 240 is applied, then tripped breaker can result.

Apr 14, 2013 | Intermatic 220v T104p Swimming Pool Pump...

1 Answer

How many 100 watt light bulbs can I hook to a 20 amp breaker (120 volts)


A 20 Amp breaker will support 2400 Watts with a 120 Volt line.

120 Volts times 20 Amps (Amperes) = 2400 Watts.

Answer? 24 100Watt light bulbs.

HOWEVER, you should always allow 1 cushion of 100 Watts.
That would be 23 100Watt light bulbs.

(Wait until you add electric motors to the equation. Things start getting a little more complicated)

(I always use 20 amp breakers for lighting. 15 amp breakers for lighting is phased out.

Secondly a 20 amp breaker requires using 12-2 or 12-3 wiring. (12/2, 12/3)
SO does the receptacles.
Therefore 12 gauge wiring is used throughout the house, until you come to the heavier loads )

[ 12/2 = 2 insulated conductors, and one bare copper ground wire.
12/3 = 3 insulated conductors, and one bare copper ground wire.

Remember, with 12/2 the Black wire is ALWAYS the Hot wire. White is Common (Neutral). Bare copper is Ground wire.

12/3 has 3 conducting wires.
One Black, one Red, and one White for the Common. (Neutral) Bare copper is Ground.
Used for 3-way switches ]

For additional questions please post in a Comment.

Regards,
joecoolvette

Oct 30, 2011 | Hammering

1 Answer

T104 double how do i install it on a 220 v hot water heater


Intermatic T104 is 240V timer with 240V clock motor.
Wiring diagrams are shown on links below:
http://waterheatertimer.org/How-to-wire-T104-Intermatic-timer.html

http://waterheatertimer.org/images/T-104-240-Volt-400.jpg

http://waterheatertimer.org/B220C.html
Terminal A is not used unless cable from breaker box has extra neutral wire. Extra neutral wire would connect to terminal A.
T104 has the extra terminal A since same mechanism is used for T103 120V timer that utilizes terminal A.

Add a comment for more free help.
Also take advantage of fixya phone service.
For a price, expert speaks with you over phone while you work on timer or any do-it-yourself project.
Fixya is always less expensive than a service call.

Feb 01, 2011 | Intermatic T103 Indoor 120-Volt 40-amp...

1 Answer

Can a 240 volt outlet be ran off this breaker and can a 240 volt electric baseboard heater be wired to it or should i use double pole breaker?


You need 240 breaker:
Notice that your 240V breaker is twice as wide as regular 120V breaker.
Notice that both switches are tied together on 240V breaker, making this a double-pole breaker.
For more information about breakers and 120-240V circuits:
http://waterheatertimer.org/See-inside-main-breaker-box.html
http://waterheatertimer.org/B220C.html
geno_3245_0.gif

Jan 24, 2011 | Siemens 20 Amp Single Pole Breaker 120/240...

1 Answer

How dou you connect the electical wires I connected them and it throws the breaker


Look at rating plate on motor.
Look for volts, watts, amps.
Figure with Volts x Amps = Watts.
Amps = Watts divided by Volts
1 hp horsepower is 756 Watts.

Lets say you have 120Volt 2hp motor
So 2 horsepower motor draws 1500 Watts
Amps = 1500 Watts divided by 120Volts = 12.5 amps = so you need 120Volt 15 amp breaker with at least 14gauge wire (as long as motor is located within 50 feet of breaker.)
If motor is farther away, then you need 20 amp breaker with 12gauge wire.

Look at circuit breaker rating.
If motor is 240 and breaker is 120, then it will trip breaker.
If motor is 120 and breaker is 240, then it will trip breaker.
If breaker is for 15 amps and motor draws 20 amps then it will trip breaker.

Generally speaking, if motor and breaker are 120V, then black wire goes to black wire; white wire goes to white wire and green wire connects to bare copper wire.
If motor and breaker are 240V, then wire colors can be different. Black-red or Black-white from breaker connect to Black-red or Black-white at motor.

Add a comment. Say the motor rating and color of motor wires. Say the breaker size and color of wires coming from breaker and I will help you wire the device.

Nov 27, 2010 | Northern Industrial Tools Electric Meat...

1 Answer

T103 clock not working


Please read all of this post. You may burn up the 120 volt T103 timer motor is you are not careful.

The statement: "I have 120v board with 120 constant and 240 timed" is not very clear to me as to what you mean.

In US residential wiring, the white wire is not always the "neutral;" The white wire is sometimes used for 240 volt circuits.

We cannot tell you how to wire your timer unless we know _exactly_ what you have.

If your incoming supply cable (from the breaker box) has 3 wires (black, white, and bare), there are two scenarios:

1...If the voltage from black (hot) to white (ALSO hot in this case) is 240 volts, and you have only 3 wires (black, white, and bare), then the T103 is the _wrong_ timer if you are trying to control a 240 volt load. You should use a T104 timer.

The T104 uses a 240 volt timer motor and the T103 uses a 120 volt timer motor.

2...If the voltage between black and white is 120 volts, then you will only be able to control 120 volt loads; then the incoming black supply wire is connected to terminal 3 and the white (neutral) wire is connected to the "A" terminal. The bare equipment grounding wire is then connected to the "GR" terminal.

To show the difference, if you are trying to control a 240 volt load, to use a T103 and wire it _correctly_, you would need to have a incoming supply cable with a total of 4 wires (black, red, white (neutral), and bare) Black to red would be 240 volts. Black to white would be 120 volts. Red to white would be 120 volts.
The connections would be as follows:
White (neutral in this case) to the "A" terminal
Black to terminal 1
Red to terminal 3
The 240 volt load would then connect to terminals 2 and 4
Both the bare equipment grounding wires are connected to the "GR" terminal.

Since you did not mention a red wire, I can only ASSUME that this is not the case.

Sorry, we can't tell you how to wire this timer based upon assumptions.

So, what do you have?


Dec 23, 2009 | Intermatic T103 Indoor 120-Volt 40-amp...

2 Answers

Clock doesn't work


The wiring diagram for that timer is somewhat misleading. The 120 volt clock timer motor is connected internally to the "A" (neutral) terminal and the #3 terminal. The "A" (neutral) terminal is to the immediate left of the #1 terminal.
Here's how to do the wiring for your use, (assuming a 120 volt supply circuit and a 120 volt lighting or other load):
Connect the incoming power (line) black wire to terminal # 3. Connect the incoming (neutral) white wire to terminal "A".
Connect the outgoing (load) black wire to terminal # 4.
Connect the outgoing (neutral) white wire to terminal "A".

Mar 08, 2009 | Intermatic T103 Indoor 120-Volt 40-amp...

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