Question about Canon Rebel XT / EOS 350D Digital Camera

1 Answer

Dark exposures why do i constantly get dark exposures?

Posted by on

  • LWoo May 28, 2008

    I really believe there IS something wrong with my camera. I know how to set the exposure and speed. I have tried all the settings, from AUTO to AV and tested in all sort of lights. I pay attention to the camera's readings before I shoot a picture and I make sure it reads a proper exposure.

    Yet, I can take a picture outdoors with the bright sun shining on the subject, with the camera set at f1.8 and ISO 100 and when the picture is taken I look in the viewfinder and looks like a great picture, but once I downloaded and view it in the computer it is DARK, and I mean very very underexposed! It makes no sense at all. I am trying to shoot as wide open as possible and trying to purposely overexpose a picture, and it will still be underexposed!

    I do not believe any setting on my camera to be the problem (in case y'all are thinking of the exposure compensation, that is at 0) but maybe I'm missing something.

    Could something in the camera be broken? maybe something in the light meter sensor?

×

1 Answer

  • Level 2:

    An expert who has achieved level 2 by getting 100 points

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    Governor:

    An expert whose answer got voted for 20 times.

    Hot-Shot:

    An expert who has answered 20 questions.

  • Expert
  • 111 Answers

This could be many things. If indoors, use higher iso setting and/or use the flash. Make sure exposure compensation is set to 0, or raise it. Use one of the automatic programs and let camera pick shutter speed and aperture. In manual mode, pay attention to exposure value in viewfinder, and avoid using higher apertures unless outdoors in bright sun (f16, f22, etc) the higher this number the less light is allowed to camera.

Posted on May 15, 2008

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

How do I lighten the pictures?


Check your camera settings:

White balance should be set to auto,
ISO should be set to auto,
flash should be set to auto,
scene should be set to auto,
Exposure Compensation should be set at 0.

If images are still too dark change ISO setting to 200. If that doesn't work change to 400. If that still doesn't work change exposure compensation to +1. If your photos are still too dark your camera is defective.

Nov 10, 2014 | Vivitar ViviCam 7024 Digital Camera

4 Answers

Dark Pictures


try reseting the camera back to default settings, there should be a function for that in the menus or a small reset hole somewhere in the camera.

Jul 23, 2008 | Canon PowerShot A640 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Canon Ixus 95. When taking pictures of people with dark clothes, the face and background (a stone wall in this case) become white and undefined. Is there a solution?


Sounds like your camera is exposing for the dark clothes and over-exposing the face. You could set the "exposure compensation" down a notch or two in this case for a better exposure.

Nov 15, 2010 | Canon PowerShot SD1200 IS / Digital IXUS...

1 Answer

My nikon D60 is taking dark photos.


The only reason the camera will be taking dark photos is when it is under exposing the image taken. This can be due to the exposure compensation set to under expose the metered exposure. Make sure the expsosure compensation is set to '0' or increase it to compensate for the dark photos.

Also inaccurately metering a scene (such as a high contrast scene) can easily fool the meter into under exposing, especially outdoors.

Jan 03, 2010 | Nikon D60 Digital Camera with 18-55mm +...

1 Answer

Picture too dark


Do not confuse dark pictures with black pictures.
1. Flash Range
2. Exposure Compensation
3. Monitor Calibration (low monitor brightness)
4. Obstructed or covered flash
5. Obstructed or covered light sensor (only on certain models)
6. Flash not firing
Visit www.kodak.com/go/stepbystep
.
NOTE:
A normal sunny outdoor scene is a good way to test the exposure metering of the camera.

Nov 16, 2009 | Kodak EasyShare C875 Digital Camera

1 Answer

My son dropped it and the flash no longer works. Pictures still look great outside but all inside pictures are super dark. How easily is the flash replaced and what is an estimated cost so I can plan to...


Contact kodak if you want an estimate for repairs.

If your camera can change the exposure, exposure settings. You could just change it so your camera can absorb more light in dark places.

Sep 09, 2009 | Kodak EasyShare C613 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Camera Flash & Picture


I just got this camera for Christmas the only way that I know of how to fix it is to change the exposure manually. If the picture is to bright you need a negative exposure, if it is to dark you need a positive exposure. I have noticed that the auto exposure does not get the correct setting that you need for the lighting.

Oct 11, 2007 | Polaroid A500 Digital Camera

2 Answers

One of the pictures has a great blue sky but the green tree is very dark and the other one has the green tree and very bright sky?


The two pictures were shot at dramatically different exposures - the "dark" one at 1/1600 shutter speed, f7.3, the "light" one at 1/320 shutter speed, f4.0. This accounts for the great difference, as the exposure conditions for the "light" one allowed much more light into the image during the exposure period. You didn't tell the whole story of how you set this up, I think you were shooting in a "spot" metering mode, where the particular exposure conditions the camera uses would vary considerably whether you were aiming at a dark area (making the picture light) or a light area (making the picture dark). I would make two recommendations: Switch your metering mode to "center weighted" (the mode labeled "[(•)]"), and also change your ISO setting to AUTO, as there would be no reason for shooting these photos at ISO 200 that I can think of.

Sep 04, 2005 | Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ20 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Pictures are underexposed


When you are photographing scenes with mostly light objects (for example, snow, water, and sand), the picture is usually underexposed (darker than it really is). The camera meter registers the brightness of the scene and tries to set the camera lens and aperture for an exposure based on average brightness levels (18% reflectance) causing it to underexpose, as in the following picture. When you are photographing scenes with mostly dark objects (for example, shade, shadow, and overcast skies), and very few light objects, the camera may overexpose the image, causing it to be too light. If you have a flash on your camera, you can compensate by adding "fill flash" for some extra light. If your camera has an exposure compensation adjustment, you can increase or decrease the exposure to correct for these exposure problems. Increase the number to make the image lighter, and decrease the number to make the image darker. You may want to try a series of shots with different exposure compensation adjustments to get a feel for how much difference these adjustments make.

Aug 29, 2005 | Kodak EasyShare CX7530 Digital Camera

Not finding what you are looking for?
Canon Rebel XT / EOS 350D Digital Camera Logo

Related Topics:

111 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Canon Digital Cameras Experts

Doberman

Level 2 Expert

246 Answers

Tony

Level 3 Expert

2598 Answers

halotheracer
halotheracer

Level 2 Expert

68 Answers

Are you a Canon Digital Camera Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...