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Irisnotes receiver cannot see pen Receiver is seen by PC through usb. It is meant to monitor the pen movements and convert them to digital handwriting. However the pen and the receiver do not communicate.

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Recently I bought a Harman Kardon HK 3770 Stereo receiver. My question is " can I use a Bose 901 Series VI speaker with this receiver?, since I plan to buy a 901 S VI speaker.. The receiver has no tape...


From the description of the Harmon Kardon, it sounds like you should be able to use the speakers, but you will not be able to use the active equalizer. The equalizer is designed to be cabled into the tape monitoring loop and allows you to listen to the equalized signal coming back into the receiver. Attach the +/- speaker wires to the right and left channel speaker connectors on your receiver.

Jan 15, 2015 | Bose Audio Players & Recorders

2 Answers

Moniter convert to t v


your monitor not convert to tv, your computer must convert to receiver. you should install a TV card.
TV card is a hardware and can receive TV Signals like antenna

Feb 15, 2014 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

What is a digital note taking pen?


It lets you write notes in your own handwriting on any regular piece of paper, then a receiver 'copies' the notes and when you plug the receiver into a USB you can put your notes on the computer, ipad, etc

Jan 20, 2013 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

I have an RCA HDTV 52" Rear Projection tv.. do


No they do not have digital tuners inside them. They are meant to be monitors to converter boxes, cable boxes, and satellite television receivers.

Jul 19, 2011 | RCA D52W20 52" Rear Projection HDTV-Ready...

1 Answer

Would I be able to connect Yamaha eq 70 equalizer to Yamaha av receiver RX-V1800 Thanks.


Be advised that the engagement of any device in a Tape Monitor loop on a late-model Audio/Video Receiver will effectively tie the receiver down to stereo-only analog sound reproduction. I'll explain.

The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop.

In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).

Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.

The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.

EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically converted to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose some form of STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Monitor as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.

In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? The rest would NOT be processed. That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Monitor is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that's the way it is. Nature of the digital beast.

Apr 16, 2011 | Yamaha RX-V1800

1 Answer

Can connect kenwood equalizer ke-205 to a surround sound receiver


Yes BUT...

The following is some boilerplate I made up that should explain some usage limitations.


Be advised that the engagement of any device in a Tape Monitor loop on a late-model Audio/Video Receiver will effectively tie the receiver down to stereo-only analog sound reproduction. I'll explain.


The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop.


In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).


Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.


The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.


EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically converted to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose a STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Monitor as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.


In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? They would NOT be processed. That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Monitor is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that's the way it is. Nature of the digital beast.


Okay, back to the hook-up:


Receiver Tape Out (Rec) - to the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Rec, Line-In;


Receiver Tape In (Play) - from the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Play , Line-Out.


So, to sum up, you can only use the EQ or any outboard processor for analog stereo sources. If you actually want to use an analog recording deck you could place it within the typical Equalizer

Feb 05, 2011 | Kenwood VR-507 Receiver

1 Answer

HOW DO I CONNECT A RECIEVER CD PLAYER AND A EQULIZER


Be advised that the engagement of any device in a Tape Monitor loop on a late-model Audio/Video Receiver will effectively tie the receiver down to stereo-only analog sound reproduction. I'll explain.


The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop.


In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).


Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.


The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.


EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically converted to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose a STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Monitor as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.


In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? They would NOT be processed. That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Monitor is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that's the way it is. Nature of the digital beast.


Jan 24, 2011 | Spectrum Technical Hifi EQ-B5100...

1 Answer

How to install a audiosouse equalizer (eq 100) onto denon 3805 receiver, without a tape monitor thanks henry


Actually, you have several tape loops: CDR/Tape, VCR1 and VCR2. The bottom right part of Page 7 in the manual shows how to connect a Tape Deck (or any in/out processor).

Be advised that the engagement of any device in a Tape Monitor loop on a late-model Audio/Video Receiver will effectively tie the receiver down to stereo-only analog sound reproduction. I'll explain.

The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop.

In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).

Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.

The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.

EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically converted to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose a STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Monitor as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.

In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? They would NOT be processed. That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Monitor is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that's the way it is. Nature of the digital beast.

Okay, back to the hook-up: Receiver Tape- or VCR Out to the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Amp-, Tape- or Rec-In; Receiver Tape- or VCR In from the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Amp-, Tape- or Rec-Out.

I have a whole array of 2-channel analog processing electronics looped out of one Tape Loop on my AVR - via a dbx 400x Program Route Selector - for making tapes or CD-R Audio recordings and otherwise modifying the analog sound for various purposes.

Aug 12, 2010 | Denon AVR-3805 Receiver

2 Answers

The USB/wireless mouse does not work on my Dell Inspiron 1525


make sure there are no power cables close to the mouse or receiver, I have seen this cause problems many times.

Also try pressing the connect button on the receiver then keep pressing the connect button on the mouse until the receiver light stops flashing

Jan 25, 2009 | HP Pavilion MX70 17" CRT Monitor

1 Answer

Digital optical from DVD player produces no audio


Hi, It sounds like your receiver is still looking for audio on the coaxial connection, rather than the optical.

1. Make sure the optical connection is between your DVD player and the LD/DVD Optical In on the back of your receiver.
2. If you have a monitor connected to the receiver to show the on-screen display, click Setup from the main menu, click Input Mode, then, next to LD/DVD choose Optical. It may be set to coaxial, analog or auto.

Alternatively, choose the input source on the front of your receiver (LD/DVD), then press Input Mode button (bottom right, near the input selector) till it displays Digital Optical.

If all else fails, reset the receiver by:
1. Turn off the receiver
2. Hold down DISPLAY and PANEL UP/DOWN buttons and press power.
3. All Clear should appear on the screen.

Use caution, however, as this will erase all the settings in your receiver.

Nov 28, 2007 | Sony STR-DA90ESG

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