Question about Canon EOS-AE-1 35mm SLR Camera

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Meter on ae1 not working when aperture setting adjusted

The metering needle in the viewfinder does not move when i change the aperture setting on my ae1. this happens on both lenses i have for this camera and both worked fine previously. battery is brand new and the camera is in manual mode of course. the needle does move when the shutter speed is changed.

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On that camera the needle is not supposed to move when the f-stop ring is turned. It should stay on whatever number it is on and you should set the ring manually to whatever the needle points to.

That camera was really not made to be easy to use in the manual mode. I guess Canon thought everyone would just use it in Auto.

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Posted on Aug 11, 2008

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Bought cheap extention tubes, now camera wont recognize the lens. How do I use them


Set the exposure mode to "M" (Manual). You'll have to set both the aperture and shutter speed yourself.

You'll also get no exposure assistance from the camera's light meter. You can review the picture after taking one and/or use the histogram to tune the exposure.

Sep 30, 2013 | Nikon D5000 Digital Camera

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I have a canon rebel T3 . How do I change the aperture ?


On right hand top of the camera there is a Mode dial. Move the dial to Av (aperture priority) then rotate the wheel in front of this dial to set the F stop. The shutter speed will automatically adjust by the light meter.

Dec 01, 2012 | Canon EOS 1100D / Rebel T3 Digital Camera

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I advise a high school yearbook and we shoot a d100. Today it's too dark to see through the viewfinder (yes the lens cap is removed), and i ger the r06 error. I've reset the camera, removed and...


First, the "r06" message is NOT an error code. It indicates the number of shots remaining in the internal memory buffer, before the camera must prevent additional shutter actuations so that it may transfer those images already in the buffer to the memory card. This "r" number will decrease with each shot taken in rapid succession until it reaches 0. The shutter release will no longer work until the buffer is transferred to the memory card, then shooting may continue again.

As far as not being able to even see through the viewfinder, it sounds like something may be obstructing the light from reaching the meter and viewfinder. The problem is most likely the position of mirror inside the camera body. With the lens off the body, the mirror should be plainly visible at about a 45 degree angle to the opening. A side view drawing of this is below. The solid red line is the mirror in the normal position. The red dashed line is the up position of the mirror when the shutter is released.

steve_con_93.jpg

When the mirror is in the "normal" position, the light from the lens is projected on a screen so that the image is visible in the viewfinder for composing and can be metered. When in the "up" position (when the shutter release is fully depressed), the light from the lens is projected on the camera's sensor for as long as set by the manual settings or program; based on ISO, aperture, etc. At the end of this time, the mirror returns to the "normal" position.

If your D100's mirror is not in the lowered 45 degree angle position, the image seen in the viewfinder is inside the camera - not that which the lens would project. Hence, the dark viewfinder, long exposure times and - I'm guessing - severely overexposed pictures because way too much light is striking the sensor because the meter is only seeing darkness.

If the mirror is ok, with the lens removed from the body, look for the aperture lever as shown in the yellow circle in the picture below:

steve_con_92.jpg

By default, the aperture is at minimum. The camera moves the lever from this position to full open (and anywhere between) as needed. You should gently move the lever to the other end of its travel to open the aperture to maximum. Point the lens away from a light source but preferably at a light colored background. Look through the lens. There should be no obstructions and be clear. Next, look at a dark colored background to find the same results. If you want, you can even allow sunlight to shine through the lens onto a sheet of paper (like a magnifying glass). The result should be a bright circle with no obstructions. Obstructions in the lens will prevent the meter in the camera from getting accurate information about the scene and if significant enough, prevent viewing through the viewfinder.

You may wish to have the camera & lens professionally cleaned and serviced to repair a mirror or lens issue.

If this was helpful, please rate it as such. Good luck!

Oct 04, 2011 | Nikon D100 Digital Camera

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I have a Nikon FM film camera. The viewfinder has three exposure indicators visible within the viewfield: + for overexposure, O for correct exposure and - for underexposure. These indicators have...


If the red light is steady on the minus sign even if you vary shutter and aperture settings and point the camera at different light exposures, then this is a metering problem. If the red light on the minus sign turns off when you have correct or over exposure, then it would mean your indicator lights for o and + are busted. Have your metering checked by a competent camera technician. In any case, since your camera is fully manual, you can use the 'sunny 16' rule and still shoot away.

Feb 26, 2011 | Nikon Photography

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For use on a non-Hasselblad camera, can I use the aperture preview button (which locks) to set aperture?


There is no communications between the camera and lens. When using a set up like this everything becomes manual and you must remember to stop down the aperture to your taking aperture before releasing the shutter. I don't know what camera or format you are going to use this lens with but assuming it is a digital "bridge" (a camera that is between an amateur and a pro) or a professional the sequence would be the same.
To view, focus and compose the lens would be set in this case F2, to select the correct light meter reading the lens is set (stopped) down to the taking aperture. The modes I've used for this have been mostly manual but lately I found that "AV" worked equally well and the camera metered to the proper exposure. Most times the camera was mounted on a tripod and the shutter was released with a electronic shutter release.
Sequence for taking a photo for me anyway was/is (with the camera mounted on a tripod) focus, compose, stop down to taking aperture, check metering and release the shutter if in AV mode or manual mode to set the shutter speed and release the shutter.
You will find that all makes of digital cameras will function differently so what sequence works for one won't work on others. This meaning I have had digital cameras that wouldn't meter through anything other then the lenses meant specifically for them.
Problems that I've had. Forgetting to stop down to taking aperture (like Duh), not fine focusing (manual), not trusting the in focus indicator, forgetting that the viewfinder is/was only 94% of the scene. Once a little time has been spent with a lens set up like this the rewards are far beyond the trivial annoyances. Have fun with it

Jan 12, 2011 | Hasselblad 110mm f/2 FE Zeiss Plannar Lens

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The light meter is not working, in AV mode the shutter speed constantly remain at 30 seconds.


It would be nice to know what camera make and model you have. However in AV mode the photographer inputs the aperture (AV meaning Aperture Priority). If you then have the aperture set at (for example) F11 and dim lighting conditions the shutter speed will be long in an attempt to give the correct exposure. If you have a meter reading you see in the viewfinder the needle will be way to the - side of the scale it may be dim enough that attempting to adjust the Aperture a few stops makes no difference in this reading. My though is, if the meter is working in "P" program and you are getting correct exposure then it's user input error rather then meter malfunction.

Jan 07, 2011 | Canon Cameras

1 Answer

Light meter or not on Maxxum 4


Yes, it has program, aperture priority, shutter priority and manual modes.The aperture and shutter settings should be visible on both the right hand top plate LCD panel, and also in an illuminate LED panel below the image in the viewfinder.

From memory (and I might be wrong) the Dynax 4 (Maxxum 4 in North America, Dynax 3 in Asia Pacific) light meter simply indicated a plus or minus symbol to indicate over or under exposure for the selected combination of shutter and aperture. The viewfinder display would have a steady dot to confirm confirm focus follwed by the chosen shutter speed and aperture setting.

I cannot find a link to anything other than a German manual, but the diagrams and a bit of mental application will go a long way if you don't understand German.

Note that if your camera's electronics have failed then there's nothing you can realistically do other than to replace it. Spares are not available and as a consumer level model it was never really intended to be serviced or repaired.

Feb 24, 2010 | Konica Minolta Maxxum 4 / Dynax 4 QD 35mm...

1 Answer

I am having trouble when my camera is on manual and i need to get the meter to zero and change the aperture number, but the green numbers and meter are blurry when i look into the lens to get the meter...


The diopter adjustment lever is just to the right of the viewfinder. Try adjusting that and see if the viewfinder sharpens up any.

If you don't have a manual for the N80, you can get one at http://www.butkus.org/chinon/nikon.htm

Dec 31, 2009 | Nikon N80 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

How to KNOW the light is right 4 an Olympus OM20 Manual camera?


OM-20 was basically a upgraded OM-10 with the manual adapter built in and a number of other refinements.

The viewfinder has LED's to show the shutter speed recommended by the camera's lightmeter for the ISO and aperture selected. It also has an exposure compensation indicator (the +/- symbol) and an indicator for flash ready which doubles up as a post-exposure flash confirmation. There is also the indicator lamp to show manual mode has been selected. OM-10 lacks the manual mode lamp and the +/- indicator.

Like the OM-10, the OM-20 is primarily an aperture priority automatic camera. In this mode you set the ISO film speed, choose which aperture you wish to use (with the ability to use the lens depth of field preview button) and then the camera selects the correct shutter speed. The +/- exposure compensation control allows the user to tell the camera to modify the recommended shutter speed by up to two stops either way.

In manual mode, there is no manual metering. The light meter behaves exactly as it does in aperture priority mode and the viewfinder shows the recommended shutter speed and not the manually selected one. Correct metering is therefore a case of adjusting the aperture first, and then choosing the correct shutter speed indicated in the viewfinder. If the user then decides to select a different shutter speed, then the aperture ring must be adjusted to maintain the correct exposure. For example the aperture is set to f8 and the camera recommends 1/60th of a second. The user decides that a faster shutter speed is required and chooses 1/250th, but the viewfinder remains showing 1/60th. In order to keep the same exposure value the user must open the aperture by two full stops to f4. The camera's light meter will detect the new aperture setting and providing the light on the object is unchanged the viewfinder shutter speed display should now show 1/250th as well to confirm the correct adjustment. Alternatively, the user can choose the shutter speed first by looking at what has been set on the control ring (or by turning the ring to the end of its travel and then counting the clicks from there as all experienced OM users do) and then turning the aperture ring until the shutter speed shown in the viewfinder matches what's been manually set.

It all sounds clumsy and complex but is done far more quickly than I've taken to type this and becomes second nature.

Aperture priority metering is selected on the camera by choosing AUTO on the mode selecter. In this mode the shutter speed ring has no effect and the viewfinder always displays the automatically selected shutter speed.

May 09, 2009 | Olympus OM-2000 35mm SLR Camera

2 Answers

Canon FTB meter


The battery only powers the meter needle. The aperture match needle is controlled by the lever that is to the right of the mirror box. You can see it with the lens off while looking at the mount. It may be bent or damaged.

Feb 06, 2008 | Photography

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