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When i turn it on it tells me to enter pass word after i do that it goes to a phoenix bios set up utility how do i set it up to start normally with out asking for a pass word

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I have the similar problem. i haven't solved it yet but do not change the hard drive. there is nothing wtong with the harddrive

Posted on Dec 28, 2011

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Actually, this sounds a little like you need to replace your bios battery on the motherboard. If the same thing is continually happening, where it asks for a bios password each time the pc starts, then it may be that it's failing to save. The bios battery may be the 'button' type & easy to change, or it might be the type thats soldered in.. Check what motherboard you have & request more help if need be. Rgds,

Posted on May 03, 2008

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Ok
go in bios setup.
enter on enter password option
again enter twoise without type any word.
and save and exit

Posted on May 03, 2008

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Safe mode to normal


Which operating system ?
The BIOS information is typically found at or near the top of the POST screen for a very short time

ALR PC non / PCI =CTRL+ALT+ESC

AMD advanced micro devices=BIOS = DEL

Award BIOS = DEL

Dtk Datatech Enterprises Co. BIOS = ESC

Phoenix BIOS = CTRL+ALT+S

Phoenix BIOS = CTRL+ALT+INS

Restart your computer
during the boot process you will see on the screen to press a certain key usually Delete or F2 to enter setup
this will differ depending on which bios you have

Press and hold that key during the boot up process to enter BIOS
if you have changed any of the BIOS settings by mistake

you can load failsafe or optimised defaultsusing the arrow keys you can after you make any changes in BIOS press Esc then press the F10 button save to cmos to restart

CMOS is an on-board semiconductor chip powered by a CMOS battery inside computers that stores information such as the system time and date and the system hardware settings for your computer..

this will reset your cmos

Feb 25, 2014 | PC Desktops

1 Answer

My tablet is stuck on the start up screen.


The BIOS information is typically found at or near the top of the POST screen for a very short time

ALR PC non / PCI =CTRL+ALT+ESC

AMD advanced micro devices=BIOS = DEL

Award BIOS = DEL

Dtk Datatech Enterprises Co. BIOS = ESC

Phoenix BIOS = CTRL+ALT+S

Phoenix BIOS = CTRL+ALT+INS

Restart your computer
during the boot process you will see on the screen to press a certain key usually Delete or F2 to enter setup
this will differ depending on which bios you have

Press and hold that key during the boot up process to enter BIOS
if you have changed any of the BIOS settings by mistake

you can load failsafe or optimised defaultsusing the arrow keys you can after you make any changes in BIOS press Esc then press the F10 button save to cmos to restart

CMOS is an on-board semiconductor chip powered by a CMOS battery inside computers that stores information such as the system time and date and the system hardware settings for your computer..

this will reset your cmos

Feb 24, 2014 | PC Desktops

1 Answer

BIOS-upgrade not working. Now Bios needs Passw. And a license is gone...


Locate Phoenix BIOS Passwords

The basic input/output system, or BIOS, is a program that acts as a digital liaison, managing communications between peripherals and the operating system.

Because the BIOS is critical to the operation of a PC, some computer manufacturers and workplaces employ a password for security.

If the password is lost or has been reset through electrostatic discharge, it would be impossible to guess without the aid of computer forensics.

Sometimes you can gain access to the BIOS through the keyboard, depending on the computer, but typically the solution is mechanical.

Contact your computer manufacturer.
All computer manufacturers have websites with technical support available.
1
Have your computer model number and serial number ready.
If the manufacturer is unable to help locate a password, standard back-door passwords may help.

2
So-called back-door passwords may help you access the BIOS.
Try using the following back-door passwords to access the BIOS: phoenix, PHOENIX, CMOS, BIOS. BIOS passwords are case sensitive.

3
Contact the motherboard's manufacturer if the back-door passwords failed.
Find the motherboard's website for technical support.
You will need to open the computer case if you do not know the motherboard brand.

4
Electrostatic discharge can reset a BIOS password.
Shutdown and unplug the computer.
Unplug the monitor and all peripherals from the PC, including speakers and USB devices.

Ground yourself by wearing an antistatic wristband clipped to the metal case, or touch something metal before you open the case.
Use the screwdriver to loosen and remove the screws from the case. Look for the motherboard, the largest circuit board inside, attached to one side of the case.

5
Printing on a motherboard can be hard to see without a magnifying glass.
Examine the motherboard for a brand name.

A good place to start searching is near the processor, the large square box on the motherboard. A flashlight and magnifying glass are especially useful for a clear view of the motherboard.
The brand name could be printed anywhere or, sometimes, not at all.

6
The motherboard battery is round and fairly flat.
Locate the CMOS battery while you have the case open.

If contacting the motherboard manufacturer failed, you will have to remove the battery.
The battery is circular, about the size of a dime, but as thick as two to three stacked dimes.

Do not disconnect or remove anything yet.
Removing the CMOS Battery

7
Note the location of any cables that need to be disconnected.
Use the digital camera to take pictures of the motherboard, or sketch the location of cables and connectors.
f any components or cables need to be moved or unplugged to reach the battery, you want to remember their exact location.

8
Leave the battery out for at least 20 minutes.
Remove the CMOS battery carefully so as not to snap or break the clamps.
Leave the battery out for 20 to 25 minutes to allow the capacitors to completely discharge any memory. Avoid touching anything else in the computer.

9
Tighten the case screws when done.
Return the battery to the motherboard, and reconnect any cables that were disconnected in the case. Close the computer case and tighten the screws.

10
Look for the setup message on the monitor.
Turn on the computer and closely watch the monitor for the "Entering Setup" message that appears before Windows starts.

The message will tell you which key to press to enter the BIOS setup.
You may need to reboot a few times to see the message, as it appears on the screen for just a few seconds.

11
Carefully read the settings information on the monitor.
Follow the directions on the monitor for changing the date, boot sequence, and any other settings.

Work slowly and read the screen directions thoroughly.
Be alert and cautious.

Once the settings are saved, the system will start, and the password will have been removed.


http://www.computerhope.com/help/phoenix.htm
Phoenix BIOS help and simulation
Recover Phoenix BIOS
Although most people think the operating system is the core software required for a computer to run, without the computer's BIOS, then the operating system cannot even launch.

When a BIOS installation encounters a problem, it can cause components of the computer not to function correctly or it can cause the computer itself not to function at all.

It is possible to recover the BIOS of a computer, if you know what sort of BIOS the computer's motherboard uses.

The recovery process should take approximately 5 to 10 minutes, during which your computer will seem mostly unresponsive.

Download a crisis recovery program designed specifically to restore damaged or otherwise non-functioning copies of Phoenix BIOS.

Read the instructions for using the recovery program to make sure that no specific changes or configurations need to be done to it before it is used.


Place the Phoenix BIOS recovery program and its files onto a blank disc or a USB drive according to the program's instructions (this usually simply consists of extracting the files from an archive.)
Once the program and its files are in place, insert the disc into the computer's drive or plug the USB drive into an available USB port.

Hold down both the Windows key and the "B" key on your keyboard and press the power button on the computer.

(On some laptop computers, you will need to press the "Fn-B" keys instead.)

Wait for the disc drive light or the USB drive access light to start flickering to show that the computer is accessing the Phoenix BIOS recovery program, and then release the keys.

Wait patiently while the Phoenix BIOS recovery program overwrites the damaged sections of the motherboard's current BIOS installation.

Depending on the computer and the recovery program used, the computer may or may not reboot once BIOS recovery is complete.

If the computer does not reboot on its own, wait at least 10 minutes before manually restarting the computer to make sure that you do not interrupt BIOS recovery.

Eject the disc or remove the USB drive before rebooting to prevent accidentally reloading the recovery program.

Reboot the computer and watch to make sure the Phoenix BIOS screen appears as normal. Once the BIOS loads properly, your operating system should launch as normal.


http://www.theeldergeek.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=21209

http://www.rechner.org/b1800.html

Jan 05, 2014 | PC Desktops

1 Answer

Bios passwords


Locate Phoenix BIOS Passwords

The basic input/output system, or BIOS, is a program that acts as a digital liaison, managing communications between peripherals and the operating system.

Because the BIOS is critical to the operation of a PC, some computer manufacturers and workplaces employ a password for security.

If the password is lost or has been reset through electrostatic discharge, it would be impossible to guess without the aid of computer forensics.

Sometimes you can gain access to the BIOS through the keyboard, depending on the computer, but typically the solution is mechanical.

Contact your computer manufacturer.
All computer manufacturers have websites with technical support available.
1
Have your computer model number and serial number ready.
If the manufacturer is unable to help locate a password, standard back-door passwords may help.

2

So-called back-door passwords may help you access the BIOS. Try using the following back-door passwords to access the BIOS: phoenix, PHOENIX, CMOS, BIOS. BIOS passwords are case sensitive.

3 Contact the motherboard's manufacturer if the back-door passwords failed.
Find the motherboard's website for technical support.
You will need to open the computer case if you do not know the motherboard brand.
4
Electrostatic discharge can reset a BIOS password.
Shutdown and unplug the computer.
Unplug the monitor and all peripherals from the PC, including speakers and USB devices.

Ground yourself by wearing an antistatic wristband clipped to the metal case, or touch something metal before you open the case.
Use the screwdriver to loosen and remove the screws from the case. Look for the motherboard, the largest circuit board inside, attached to one side of the case.
5

Printing on a motherboard can be hard to see without a magnifying glass. Examine the motherboard for a brand name.

A good place to start searching is near the processor, the large square box on the motherboard. A flashlight and magnifying glass are especially useful for a clear view of the motherboard.
The brand name could be printed anywhere or, sometimes, not at all.
6
The motherboard battery is round and fairly flat. Locate the CMOS battery while you have the case open.

If contacting the motherboard manufacturer failed, you will have to remove the battery.
The battery is circular, about the size of a dime, but as thick as two to three stacked dimes.

Do not disconnect or remove anything yet. Removing the CMOS Battery

7
Note the location of any cables that need to be disconnected. Use the digital camera to take pictures of the motherboard, or sketch the location of cables and connectors.
f any components or cables need to be moved or unplugged to reach the battery, you want to remember their exact location.
8
Leave the battery out for at least 20 minutes. Remove the CMOS battery carefully so as not to snap or break the clamps.
Leave the battery out for 20 to 25 minutes to allow the capacitors to completely discharge any memory. Avoid touching anything else in the computer.
9
Tighten the case screws when done. Return the battery to the motherboard, and reconnect any cables that were disconnected in the case. Close the computer case and tighten the screws.
10
Look for the setup message on the monitor. Turn on the computer and closely watch the monitor for the "Entering Setup" message that appears before Windows starts.

The message will tell you which key to press to enter the BIOS setup.
You may need to reboot a few times to see the message, as it appears on the screen for just a few seconds.
11
Carefully read the settings information on the monitor. Follow the directions on the monitor for changing the date, boot sequence, and any other settings.

Work slowly and read the screen directions thoroughly.
Be alert and cautious.

Once the settings are saved, the system will start, and the password will have been removed.
http://www.computerhope.com/help/phoenix.htm
Phoenix BIOS help and simulation


Reset a Phoenix BIOS Password


The Phoenix BIOS (Basic Input/Output System) is a simple program that resides on the CMOS ROM (Read Only Memory) chip on a computer system's motherboard.

There are a couple of major BIOS manufacturers, including Phoenix. Each BIOS contains a set of initial parameters that can be set using a simple text interface.

A security feature is built into the program that allows the computer user to set a password for the BIOS.

When activated, the computer will not complete the booting up process until the password is entered. If the password is unknown, then it must be reset in order to gain access to the computer.
WARNING: Before you start troubleshooting remember that you are dealing with electricity that can KILL.
http://www.kitchentablecomputers.com/static.php - rules

·
Turn off the computer and unplug all cables from the back of the case, labeling each one if it isn't color coded. This must include the power cable, which should also be unplugged from the wall or power strip.
·2

Open the computer case by removing the screws on the back that hold the side panel on the frame.
Some systems will use thumb screws and no tools will be required.
However, most computer systems will require the use of a Phillips head screwdriver.
·3

Locate the CMOS battery.
It will be located near the CMOS chip and looks like a large watch battery (see the link below).
http://www.dewassoc.com/support/bios/bios_password.htm

Check to see if there is a three-pin jumper switch near the CMOS battery as well.

It is only present on some motherboards and will be used in step 4 if it is there.
·4

Remove the CMOS battery.
Leave the battery out for 30 minutes to allow any residual electricity in the CMOS ROM to discharge.

This will effectively reset all settings in the CMOS to default values and clear the password.

If the three-pin jumper is present, leave the CMOS battery in place.
Move the jumper on the pins from the side it is on to the opposite pins.

Then attach the power cord and reboot the system.

It will not boot up but actually clear the CMOS settings.

Remove the power cord and move the jumper back to its original pins. ·5

Re-attach the computer system cover and replace the screws holding it in place.


Re-attach all of the cables to the back of the computer and reboot.
Your Phoenix BIOS password is now reset and you will be able to boot into your operating system.

You may need to re-enter the CMOS settings if it doesn't recognize all of your components such as expanded memory or DVD drives, etc.

Dec 29, 2013 | PC Desktops

1 Answer

Is there a way to change windows xp bios settings after boot up, particularily using the command line?


My knowledge of using the command line is equal to my knowledge about astrophysics. Zero.
You can change BIOS settings in the BIOS Setup utility. After the computer manufacturer's splash screen, (Logo screen), and at the bottom of the screen, are shown the key/s to press to enter BIOS Setup.
Goes by real F-A-S-T. Try to write it down. Let Windows load all the way, then restart the computer.
As SOON as you see the manufacturer's splash screen, start tapping on the key/s to enter BIOS Setup. If you miss this window of opportunity, let Windows load all the way. Turn the computer off normally. (Wait at least 20 seconds) This time as Soon as you press the Power On button, start tapping on the appropriate key/s. (In 2 second intervals) You don't get as far as the splash screen? Then unplug the computer from power. Observe Anti-Static Precautions. Remove the CMOS battery, (CR2032), for 1 minute. Press the Power On button in, and hold it in. Hold it in for a count of 5 seconds. Let go of the Power On button. Do this procedure two more times. Install the CMOS battery. Plug into power. WAIT 1 minute, turn the computer on. This procedure will set the BIOS Settings back to the factory default settings, and clear CMOS Error Codes. Post back as to your findings.

Sep 14, 2011 | PC Desktops

1 Answer

Press delete enter to set up so what can i do nothing is working


Sound you are trying to get into the BIOS, some use key F2,F8, or F10, it will say very fast what the correct key is, it might be very fast.

The first item is the key or key combination. The second is the model of PC or the maker of the BIOS. You'll see some companies listed many times, with different keystrokes. That's normal. (It's not that manufacturers can't make up their minds. It's just that they change suppliers and use different BIOS setups.)
Delete: AMI or Award BIOS.
Esc: Toshiba
F1: Toshiba; Phoenix; some IBM PS/1 models.
F10: Compaq.
F2: NEC.
Insert: IBM PS/2.
Tab: eMachines.
Reset button (press twice): Some old Dells.
Ctrl-Alt-+: Various computers.
Ctrl-Alt-?: Some old IBM PS/2 models.
Ctrl-Alt-Enter: Some Dells, others.
Ctrl-Alt-Esc: AST, Tandon, others.
Ctrl-Alt-Ins: Zenith PCs, Phoenix BIOS.
Ctrl-Alt-S: Phoenix BIOS.
Ctrl-Alt-Shift with Del (on number pad): Olivetti.
Ctrl-Esc: Many PCs.
Ctrl-Ins: Some IBM PS/2s.
Ctrl-S: Phoenix BIOS.
Ctrl-Shift-Esc: Tandon

Dec 02, 2009 | Acer Aspire™ T180 PC Desktop

1 Answer

Unable to Acces BIOS on IBM Netvista 607931u w/ Phoenix ROM BIOS


When the IBM Setup Utility program prompt is displayed, quickly press F1.
The prompt is displayed for only a short time.
if you dont see the prompt, tap F1 repeatedly as the computer starts. If it says "starting windows" you've let it go too far and will have to restart again and repeat the process to get into the bios
REGARDS..

Apr 09, 2009 | IBM NetVista PC Desktop

1 Answer

Floppy drive


You're talking about My PC and device manager and I'm talking about Bios.
The BIOS (stands for Basic Input/Output System) is system software inside your computer that helps the computer start up, even before Windows does. It also contains key settings about what the computer has on board.
In newer computers, it exists on a special chip called CMOS (stands for Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor).

You can go into the BIOS to edit or change the technical information about key components of the computer like disk drives, keyboards, and display settings. It also keeps track of the date and time.
The BIOS can normally be accessed when you start your computer. You may see a reference to "Setup" when you turn your computer on. That’s your opportunity to get into the BIOS. It usually requires the push of a function key, such as F10, to get access to it. That "F" key varies between computers. Sometimes it’s not even one of the Function keys, but the ESC key or DEL key.

If a logo screen—like HP or Dell—is displayed during the start up process instead, then you may want to check with your computer maker for a command to turn off that screen and display the start up information, which is listed when a computer is powered on.
A partial list of BIOS access commands by brand is listed at the end of this article.
The BIOS also contains the boot-up sequence. Normally, computers are configured to boot from a hard drive.


Before you do anything to your BIOS, it’s always a good idea to record the original settings on a sheet of paper that can be kept in a safe place so you can reference it later if you need to reset it.
Here is a list of key sequences for various brand-name computers. If yours is not there, check with your manufacturer or watch for info flashed on-screen when your computer first starts, before Windows begins. It may say

"For setup hit..." That will be how to get into the BIOS on your machine.
Acer: - Ctrl+Alt+Esc
ALR PC: (F2) or Ctrl+Alt+Esc
AMI BIOS: (Del), (F1) or (F2)
AST, Advantage, Award, Tandon: - Ctrl+Alt+Esc
Award BIOS: (Del) or Ctrl+Alt+Esc
Compaq: (F10) (do this when the cursor is in the upper right corner of the screen blinking)
Dell: - F1 or Del.
Dell: - Some require pressing reset twice
Dell: - Ctrl + Alt + Enter
DTK BIOS: (Esc)
Gateway 2000: - F1
Hewlett Packard: - F1
IBM:
Older Models - In order to get into the configuration of the IBM setup screen (CMOS) screen you need to hold down both mouse buttons during boot up.
Aptiva - Press F1
IBM PS/2: Ctrl+Alt+Ins after Ctrl+Alt+Del
IBM PS/2 with reference partition: - Press Ins during boot
Some PS/2s, such as 75 and 90: - Ctrl Alt ?
Some PS/2s when pointer at top right of screen: - Ctrl + Ins
NEC: - F2
Packard Bell: - F1 or F2
Phoenix BIOS: (F1), (F2), or Ctrl+Alt+Esc
Phoenix BIOS: - Ctrl+Alt+S
Phoenix BIOS: - Ctrl+S
Phoenix BIOS: - Ctrl+Alt+Ins
Sharp Laptop 9020: - F2
Sony: (F3) while you are starting the PC, then (F2) or (F1)
Tandon computers: - Hold down the key after turning on power
Tandon: - Ctrl+Shift+Esc
Toshiba Laptops: - Toshiba Utility
Toshiba: - Press Esc during boot
Toshiba, Phoenix, late model PS/1 Value Point and 330s: - Press F1 during boot
Olivetti PC Pro: - Shift+Ctrl+Alt + Num Pad Del
Miscellaneous PC’s: - Ctrl + Esc or Ctrl and Alt and +
Zenith: - Ctrl+Alt+Ins

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Oct 15, 2008 | PC Desktops

1 Answer

Phoenix bios setup utility page,


do one thing go for the othr key board and try if working fine then you key board problem after that is not working then go for the install the new o/s.

May 10, 2008 | Lenovo 3000 N100 0768 - Pentium Dual Core...

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