Question about Pentax K1000 35mm SLR Camera

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How do i know when my battery is dead. Every time my pictures are developed, they come out black. how do i use the exposure meter?

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The K1000 is all mechanical, the battery only powers the light meter. So even if the battery is dead, then you should still be getting images even if very over or under-exposed.

If the images are totally black on the negatives, then your shutter is stuck open and massively over-exposing your images. If the images are black on the prints, then the negatives have been unexposed and will be totally clear. The latter problem means that the film has not been exposed at all and is either due to incorrect film loading, faulty film winding, or a shutter which fails to open.

To eliminate the possibility of a shutter fault, hold the camera up to the light with the camera back open and fire the shutter at each setting. You should see light as the shutter opens and from 1s to 1/30s should be able to see and hear the difference at each speed.

To check film loading and advancing correctly, load a film and wind film on (remember this camera needs the film leader to be manually engaged onto the take-up spool). Use the rewind crank (do not press the rewind button) to take up the loose film and take a few shots. You should see the rewind crank turn each time you advance the film if it is correctly loaded and advancing. If not, open the camera back and visually inspect the film. It should be securely engaged into the take up spool. With the back still open, advance the film and take a few shots: the take-up spool should be advancing and the sprocket wheel (just before the spool, it's the wheel which engages the holes at the edge of the film) should also be turning. If it isn't, then the film rewind mechanism is faulty and the camera is behaving as if the rewind button has been pressed. It's usually easy to remove the bottom of the camera to check that the button isn't sticking.

If all checks so far are OK then check the film pressure plate on the inside of the film door. It should be able to give a little when pressure is applied and holds the film firmly in contact with the advance sprocket, if not then one of the seating pins on the flat metal spring may have become dislodged and it's usually easy to reseat it. Clean the plate after touching it as it must be grease-free and spotless.

If you try all this and still have a problem then please add a follow up comment and I'll try to respond asap, but bear in mind that as I'm in the UK I may be in a different time zone to you.

If I've fixed your problem, then please take a moment to rate my answer.

Posted on Sep 02, 2010

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1 Answer

What should exposure compensation be set on


That depends on what you're taking a picture of. Normally, you'd want it on zero.

Use it if the exposure meter produces an exposure too light or too dark for the subject. The camera's meter is designed to render all scenes as a medium gray. If you take a picture of a white dog playing in the snow, the camera will try to render the scene as a medium gray. In this situation you want to use positive exposure compensation to render the scene brighter.

Conversely, if take a picture of a black cat sunning itself on a black car, the camera will again try to render the scene as a medium gray. In this case you want negative exposure compensation to darken the scene.

Jul 09, 2011 | Kodak EasyShare C143 Digital Camera

1 Answer

CAN YOU PLEASE EXPLAIN TO TO ME WHAT IS EV COMPENSATION AND HOW DOES IT WORK


EV compensation is "Exposure Value compensation". The camera contains an exposure meter which determines how much light is on the scene and sets the exposure appropriately. However, this meter does not know WHAT you're taking a picture of, nor does it know what effect you're going for. The best it can do is to assume you're taking a picture of an "average" scene and want it to be of "average" brightness. It does this by assuming the scene is "middle gray," halfway between black and white. Most of the time this works fine, because most scenes are, well, average.
However, this is not always the case. Suppose you're taking a picture of a white dog playing in the snow. Almost everything in the scene is bright white, but the camera doesn't know that. It tries to make the scene middle gray, and the result is that you get a gray dog playing in gray snow.
On the other hand, suppose you're taking a picture of a black cat sleeping on the hood of a black car. Here everything is black, but the camera doesn't know it. It tries to make an average scene, resulting in a gray cat sleeping on a gray car.
EV compensation allows you to override the camera's exposure setting. In the first example, you'd want to add two or three stops (positive EV compensation) to force the camera to render the dog and snow as white instead of gray. In the second example, you'd want to subtract a stop or two (negative EV compensation) to render the cat black instead of gray.
How much EV compensation is correct? Well, that depends on the scene. With a digital camera, you can look at the picture and see whether the dog looks white or the cat looks black. Film photographers take lots of shot, using various levels of EV compensation, so that one of them would come out right.

Mar 19, 2011 | DXG Technology DXG-505V Digital Camera

1 Answer

Hello, I would like my pictures to have a white background. When I take the picture on a white background the background ends up looking gray. I am taking pictures of baby clothing and I want the clothing...


Exposure meters are designed on the premise that the scene is an average, middle gray, in brightness. If you take a picture of a white dog playing in the snow, the camera will try to make the picture come out middle gray (a gray dog playing in gray snow). If you take a picture of a black cat sitting on black asphalt, the camera will try to make the picture come out middle gray (a gray cat sitting on gray ground).

If the white background is dominating the scene, the camera will reduce exposure to try to make the entire scene come out middle gray. The solution is to meter on something else. Move in close and fill the frame with the subject, press the AE-LOCK button, then move back, compose the picture, and take the shot. For full details, refer to the "Shooting with the exposure locked --- AE-LOCK" section in the manual (page 52 in my copy).

If you're taking a lot of pictures, you might want to switch to Manual mode and set the exposure accordingly.

Dec 29, 2010 | Sony Cyber-Shot DSC-F717 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Exposure Compensation (-2.0EV to +2.0EV in 1/3EV increments) whats best for cybershot p71


That depends on the current situation. The exposure compensation merely subtracts or adds exposure to the "best" setting as determined by the camera's meter. The camera works on the assumption that your subject is composed of "middle gray" tones.

For a backlit subject, for example, you might want to add some exposure to bring out details in the subject at the expense of blowing out the highlights in the background. If you're taking a picture of a black cat sitting on black asphalt, you'd probably want to subtract exposure so you don't get a gray cat on a gray background. If you have a white dog in the snow, you'd want to add exposure so you don't get a gray dog on a gray background.

Again, there is no such thing as a "best" setting. There is only a "best" setting for a particular picture-taking situation, and even then the setting depends on your artistic inclinations.

Dec 17, 2010 | Cameras

1 Answer

Why do my pictures come out black when they are developed


If we assume that the lens cap has been removed for the pictures, then you have other issues. The shutter is not opening. Why?
1. mechanical issue like something broken, bent, jumped out of the track.
solution: repair shop

2. electronic issue like exposure module died, misreading exposure sensor, flash not raising and firing, etc.
solution: repair shop.

Repair shop will also Clean, Lube and Adjust.

Apr 23, 2010 | Canon EOS Rebel X 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Camera worked fine for the first 2 weeks i had it and now all of a sudden when i take pictures it makes the pictures darker than they are, for example ill take a pik in a fully lit room take hte pic and...


There are a lot of possiblities. Here are a few:
Flash is off.
Flash is not getting sufficient time to recharge after firing. Usually caused by low battery.
Camera is set to manual mode and either shutter is too fast or aperature is too small.
Film speed is too slow.
Light metering is not reading proper light levels.
Custom exposure setting is reducing exposure.

If this helps please vote for my solution.

Nov 27, 2009 | Fuji Photography

1 Answer

Picture too dark


Do not confuse dark pictures with black pictures.
1. Flash Range
2. Exposure Compensation
3. Monitor Calibration (low monitor brightness)
4. Obstructed or covered flash
5. Obstructed or covered light sensor (only on certain models)
6. Flash not firing
Visit www.kodak.com/go/stepbystep
.
NOTE:
A normal sunny outdoor scene is a good way to test the exposure metering of the camera.

Nov 16, 2009 | Kodak EasyShare C875 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Exposure needle not working


clean the battery cover and contact with a pencil eraser making sure the cap threads are also clean.
this is a fairly expensive repair if the meter or circuit board needs replacing ( no new parts are available ).
if the meter still does not work, and the K1000 is in good working order buy a inexpensive hand held light meter.

Jun 11, 2009 | Pentax K1000 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Turn off developer led


HII.best way is that u have to replace developer with new one .new developer will reset it automatically.for to reset in this condition
press clear key ,exposure mode key,clear key,exposure mode key,
copier will go dead .press 24 then start 06 start
developer counter will bi reset
do not forget to rate the solution
MIAN AKHLAQ

Mar 17, 2009 | Sharp Office Equipment & Supplies

1 Answer

Nikon EM (1979?) Won't wind film, photos don't come out


Not necessarily. The EM has an M90 setting which will fire the shutter at 1/90th of a second. The meter is inactive on this setting. It was put on the EM so that if the batteries fail, you can shoot at 1/90th and take a guess at the exposure. There is also a small button (blue or chrome, depending on the production run) which lights up a red LED if the batteries are good. The light meter doesn't work until the frame counter is at 1 or higher. Before the #1, the shutter will always fire at 1/2000th of a second to speed up the film loading process. You can tell that the meter is working by observing the meter's scale/needle on the inside of the viewfinder. If it is pointing out of the red zone, it's OK to shoot (proper exposure). If the needle is in the red zone (indicating under or over exposure) the camera will "beep" as an audible warning. Check the battery condition first.

Mar 16, 2009 | Nikon EM 35mm SLR Camera

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