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With unit set to air conditioning, the controller board will not turn on the blower motor and the cooling coil freezes up. McNutt tells me the controller board is kaput and they want $550 for it. In the meantime they have jumpered over the controller so the blower runs constantly. Was hoping someone might be able to tell me where to get it for less. It is HSCI Furnace Controller For Use With All Gasses 1012-940, model HK42FZ011

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? need more info like make model and serial numbers

Posted on Aug 19, 2010

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3 Answers

My Goodman heat pump doesn't blow air through the vents into the house, but the fan comes on when the thermostat is turn on for the air conditioning


Check first that
  • the air conditioning equipment is turned on,
  • the thermostat is calling for cooling, and that
  • the blower unit or air handler is actually blowing air through the ductwork.
Here are the details of what to check in what order if your air condtioner or heat pump doesn't start at all when you set the room thermostat to call for cooling:
  1. Check the Room Thermostat Temperature Setting: Set the thermostat to at least 5 degrees below room temperature. Our elderly mom has no patience with switches and controls. She regularly calls her air conditioning service company with a service request, sometimes late at night, because she has simply failed to set the temperature on the thermostat lower than the room temperature. Don't drive your A/C like our mother.
  2. Check that the Room Thermostat is set to "Cool" not "Off" or "Heat". If the thermostat is not set to "cool" it is simply turning off your A/C. If the thermostat display is blank then it's not receiving power (for modern digital thermostats). Check that electrical power is on at the air handler and to the the low-voltage transformer that supplies power to the thermostat.

    If the thermostat has power, check that when you set the thermostat temperature down at least 5 degrees below room temperature the thermostat calls for cooling. If it doesn't then check for broken or shorted thermostat wires anywhere between the wall thermostat and the control board at the air handler.

    You can easily eliminate possible thermostat problems as a cause of failure of the air conditioner to start by simply eliminating the thermostat from the picture: disconnect the thermostat wires at the blower unit's control board and instead connect the two thermostat terminals directly together with a jumper wire. If the system starts then the problem is in the thermostat itself or in its wiring.

    If the thermostat is working but the compressor condenser unit won't start, you could skip ahead
    to COMPRESSOR / CONDENSER DIAGNOSTICS but I wish you'd double check the remaining steps in this article first because there are some sneaky snafus listed below that might still be the problem.

  3. Check that electricity is on for the equipment. Check all of the electrical switches and controls that can turn electrical power off at the indoor air handler or at the outdoor compressor/condenser unit. There are more of these switches than you might guess. Here's a list of what to check:

    Electrical power switches and service switches outside by the compressor, inside at the air handler, and fuses or circuit breakers in the electrical panel. Don't forget to check that the access covers to the equipment are properly closed and latched. Otherwise a
    BLOWER DOOR SAFETY SWITCH could be keeping the equipment from running.

    There are several other safety switches and controls, both manual and automatic that can leave an air conditioner or heat pump turned "off" such as a blower compartment door interlock safety switch, an electric motor overload or overheat switches, and a condensate tray spillage detector switch.

    Some hard-to-find electrical switches on an air conditioner or heat pump could be keeping your air conditioner from starting, such as
    a FLOAT SWITCH on Condensate Tray that could
    be
    causing CONDENSATE PAN SWITCH LOCKOUT - condensate spilling into an overflow pan that uses a sensor switch can be enough to shut down your air conditioner.
    or
    a blower MOTOR OVERLOAD RESET SWITCH could be keeping a fan motor from starting.

    A bad or failed starter capacitor could also be leaving your system shut down, failing to start a blower, fan, or compressor motor.
    See CAPACITORS for HARD STARTING MOTORS

    Watch out: See A/C - HEAT PUMP CONTROLS & SWITCHES to be sure you have found and checked everymanual or automatic electrical switch on the system.
  4. Check the electrical supply voltage. Even if electricity is on, if the supply voltage has fallen too far below the operating voltage range of your air conditioner it's likely that the system will not operate, particlarly, you may note that the compressor motor won't start.
    See VOLTS MEASUREMENT METHODS

Aug 22, 2017 | Goodman Heating & Cooling

3 Answers

Have a Rheem central air unit situated outdoors, 20 yrs/old. The condensers are contained within it. I can run it 2 days straight, no problems. As soon as I turn it off, water winds up inside.


If the unit is freezing you will begin to see frost building up on the larger diameter copper. Also if you take the panel off of the evaporator coil (section that the copper is entering) you should be able to dump some water in the pan And make sure it is draining. Slowly pour the water.

Jul 10, 2017 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

Amana PTAC PTH093E Fan runs at single speed only regardless of setting-auto/low/high Hot or cool air is coming out so compressor/heat coil is working. Reset unit and replaced fan motor-no change.


I've replaced many Amanda control boards. They have micro relays attached to the board. These relays are about a half inch by 1 inch in size, and control line voltage to the compressor and blower motor, and give up quite often. Its probably the board if its a digital controlled board. If it has manual, turn to select, type knob, it will be in that fan section knob. Hope this helps!

Mar 13, 2017 | Amana Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

Pro Standard Fan mount


Since the failure of an air conditioner to turn on, loss of air conditioner cooling capacity, reduced air conditioning output temperatures, loss of cool air supply, or even loss of air flow entirely can be due to a variety of problems with one or more components of an air conditioner or air conditioning system, after reviewing the lost air conditioner cooling diagnosis procedures described in this article, be sure to also review the diagnostic procedures at each of the individual air conditioning diagnosis and repair major topics listed just below. To return to our air conditioning and refrigeration home page go to AIR CONDITIONING & HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS.

Electrical problems on HVAC systems: Keep in mind that despite the depth of technical detail you will find here about all components of air conditioners and heat pumps, most service calls for non-working air conditioners or heat pumps turn up an electrical problem. So if your A/C system is just not working at all be sure to check all of our electrical and control setting suggestions first.

Mechanical problems on HVAC systems: tend to fall into these groups: refrigerant leaks, dirty condenser coil or unit, dirty evaporator or cooling coil, or burned out (or hard-starting) compressor motors. We have also seen a number of problems with fans and fan motors in both the compressor/condenser unit and in the air handler/blower fan unit. Some of those fan problems are mechanical - like a loose fan belt or blade. MORE DETAILS

Nov 13, 2012 | Heating & Cooling

2 Answers

Where do the 3 wires from the blower motor connect to on the control board for high speed use in the summer time? Black, Blue, and the Red one? The white is a no brainer. I can go to M1, cool, and heat....


Hello, the black wire is your high sped motor tap and it should be on cool as you have it. Blue is med-hi and red is your low speed motor tap. You have it wired correctly. Now the freezing can be caused by 2 things, low airflow or a low refrigerant charge. Low airflow can be caused by a dirty air filter, dirty evaporator coil, dirty blower wheel or the blower itself is running slow due to a weak capacitor. Anytime the motor is changed out the capacitor should aswell. If the airflow appears to be ok then the unit is low on refrigerant.

Jul 11, 2012 | Heating & Cooling

3 Answers

Coils are freezing in the room air conditioner


Hello my name is Heath it will be my pleasure to assist you. First thing to do is turn the unit off and check the filter then if the filter is okay check to see if the blower comes on when you put the fan switch on the thermostat from auto to on. If the blower isn't coming on then there could be a problem with the blower motor. If the motor is running then turn the system to cool and turn the setting down to where the air should be on. Then check the outside unit and be sure the outside unit is running if the outside unit is not running go to the house panel box and check the breaker to see if any of them are tripped or off. If there off turn them on and check the outside unit again. If all is running and you get no air flow through the vents then the coil could be frozen. If the unit is frozen turn the thermostat to off and leave the indoor blower on by leaving the fan switch in the on position for a couple hours till it thaws. If the unit froze up then there could be a problem with the a/c system most likely low on refrigerant as a result of a leak. I would have it leak tested and repaired if this is the case.

Aug 30, 2011 | Haier Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

Coils freeze up


The first thing to do is see if the indoor (evaporator-air handler) fan and compressor are both running at the same time, then turn the unit off and let all the ice melt.
If the compressor is running and the evaporator fan isn't, you've already found the main cause of your air conditioning freezing problem.
The indoor coil will freeze up if the compressor runs without the evaporator fan running.
Check to see if ice has built up enough to stop the fan.
If it has, (and it's possible with wall mounted ductless mini split units and some window units), the fan may run normally once the ice melts, and the cause of your air conditioning freezing problem could be something else.
If you are the equipment owner trying to take care of this air conditioning freezing problem yourself, and you get to the point that you have to call in a technician, it could save him time, (which saves you money) if you have already verified whether the evaporator fan was or wasn't running with the compressor, and if ice had built up enough to stop the fan.
Once the ice has melted, check the fan or blower blades, and see if they're clean and not obstructed by something like a plastic bag, other debris, or mould growth.
Remove any obstructions, and if necessary, remove the blower and clean it.
Before tearing into the rest of the unit, check the thermostat and make sure it's working right.
Do the cool contacts open when the t-stat is turned up to a higher temp than the room temp?
If not, the thermostat has failed, and never turns the unit off, which can definitely cause an air conditioning freezing problem.
Do the fan contacts open and close when the thermostat setting is turned higher and lower than the room temperature?
If the fan contacts never close but the cool contacts do, the thermostat has failed and caused your air conditioning freezing problem.
If the fan contacts close, but the fan doesn't run, check the fan relay in the air handler.
If the fan relay is not getting control voltage, the circuit is open between the thermostat and the fan relay.
Look for a loose connection, wrong connection, dis-connection, or broken wire.
If it gets control voltage but doesn't energize, it has failed, and must be replaced.
If it energizes but the fan doesn't run, check for line voltage on the load side of the relay.
If there is line voltage on the load side of the relay and the fan doesn't run, you'll have to troubleshoot the load side circuit and the fan motor as detailed further on.
If the thermostat checks out ok, set the thermostat to "fan on" and make sure the blower runs in the correct direction and at the proper RPM, that it is installed in the housing correctly, and is the right size.
If the blower is installed backwards or is running in reverse, the coil can freeze up. (Although I have seen several units that didn't freeze up with reversed blowers.)
You will need to turn the blower around, reverse the rotation of the motor if it is a reversible rotation motor, or install a motor with the correct rotation.
A blower that runs too slow can cause an air conditioning freezing problem.
You'll need to install a motor that runs at the correct speed.
A blower that is too small, or that is installed in the housing incorrectly, can cause an air conditioning freezing problem.
You will need to install the correct size blower, and be sure it is installed correctly in the housing.
This means centered, with volutes installed, and the curve of the vanes matching the outlet of the housing.
If the blower motor is the wrong size, if the bearings are failing, or if it has an open start winding or a failed run capacitor, it could be overheating and stopping intermittently.
A motor that is overheating and stopping intermittently can cause an air conditioning freezing problem.
To check out the evaporator fan motor:
Check the resistance readings of the motor windings.
If you get a readable resistance between all three windings, the motor windings should be ok.
Turn the shaft. If it turns free and easy, the bearings should be ok.
If the shaft is hard to turn, lube the bearings with 20 SAE electric motor oil if there are lube ports.
If that frees the shaft, it should run ok for a while, but the bearings or bushings may be deteriorated to the point that they'll sieze again soon.
If the shaft doesn't free up, replace the motor.
If the shaft turns freely, check the capacitor.
The best way to check the capacitor is to replace it with a new one of the correct rating.
If the motor runs, close the air handler panels, and take an amp draw on the motor.
If it's normal it should run OK, and if the motor was the problem, your air conditioning freezing problem should stop.
Ok, if you've verified that the controls and fan are good, take a break for a diet soda, and then we'll see if the evaporator coil or ducting are the cause of your air conditioning freezing problem.
Take a look at the evaporator coil.
Is it clean? Can you see your flashlight shining through from the other side?
If the coil's dirty, you'll have to do some air conditioning coil cleaning.
If your air conditioner is a window type, our page about how to clean window air conditioners has some pointers you might find useful.
A dirty evaporator coil is a common cause of air conditioning freezing,
And it's one of the problems that can be prevented with regularly scheduled air conditioning maintenance.
If the coil is clean, check the ducting to make sure nothing is blocking air flow.
Blocked ducting will stop air flow through the evaporator coil, and this will cause the coil to freeze up.
If your coil is clean and the ducting is clear, let's run the unit and check the operating pressures and temperatures.
If your discharge and suction pressures are low, with a low compressor amp draw, low subcooling, high superheat, and low temperature splits accross your evaporator and condenser coils, you probably have a leak.
Shut the unit down, find the leak and repair it.
Once the leak is found and/or repaired and you're ready to run the unit, our Charging Air Conditioning Systems page offers some tips that you might find helpful.
If you are totally unable to locate the leak with a bubble solution or electronic detector, you'll have to charge in refrigerant to correct pressures, temperatures, and superheat and subcooling values, and it would be a good idea to add some air conditioning leak detector dye so the leak can be found later on.
You have to use some common sense about leaks.
If the leak is so small that you can't find oil or any other sign; unless the customer agrees to pay you for all the time you spend, it's more cost effective to charge in the small amount of refrigerant it will take to get the unit running correctly, finish the service call, and be on your way.
I can't imagine that there's a service technician out there who hasn't run into the same problem many times.
Use some common sense, be up front with your customer, and if you've done your best not only to find the leak, but to get the unit running right and save your customer unnecessary expense, consider it a job well done.
If your suction pressure is low enough to cause the evaporator to freeze up, but you have high subooling and high superheat, either your metering device is restricted or the wrong size, your drier is restricted, or your liquid line is restricted.
Evaluate all of the system's operating characteristics to isolate the restriction.

Copied from the following web site:
http://www.air-conditioning-and-refrigeration-guide.com/air-conditioning-freezing.html

Jun 30, 2011 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

During air condition mode fan does not run unit freezes up and there is a red flashing light on the circuit control board. The board # is GMP 125-5. The outside compressor work normally.


Dear tomsandi,
Either the fan motor is burnt out or it is not getting the power supply, hence the fan is not working. Since there is no air passing through the evaporator the cooling is not taken off fron the coil so it freezes. The fan motor has to checked up.
Regards,
ramesh22

Jun 25, 2008 | Heating & Cooling

2 Answers

Price to replace cooling coil on WeatherKing 12AJA4801


If the coil was frozen over it tells me there is a different problem. If the coil is frozen over try this. turn the circulating fan to the on position and the sir conditioning to off . Let it run this way for 1-2 hours to melt the ice and re-establish the air circulation. Then turn the a/c back to the cool mode and see how it performs.

Lower temperatures during evening and night conditions can cause coils to freeze over. Running you A/C with the fan in the on position generally takes care of this problem when you are cooling.

Jun 04, 2008 | Weather King 10AJA2501AH Air Conditioner

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