Question about Bushnell Velocity Speed Gun

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I have a bushnell 375 rotary power telescope. The small scope is out of alignment for the larger scope. I've lined up the small one with the moon, but I've tried several times to line up the larger scope to no avail!! I set it on the "Moon" setting and haven't extended the barrel for fine tuning yet. I don't know which of the three lenses to start out with. Can you help me? Thx, Rick

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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SOURCE: Instructions Manual

i BOUGHT THIS BUSHNELL REFLECTING TELESCOPE AT A YARD SALE,,,NO INSTRUCTION MANUAL AND i AM LOST AS TO HOW TO ALIGH IT. THE LOCATOR SCOPE WORKS FINE, BUT WITH AN ERECTING LENS AND A 5MM (THE LOWEST i HAVE) I STILL SEE NOTHING BUT MOTTLED GREY IN THE MAIN SCOPE..PLEASE HELP THANKS, CONFUSED

Posted on Aug 17, 2007

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SOURCE: tasco 45-060525

What eyepieces sizes have you used?
Try using the largest eyepieces you have (20mm, 25mm or higher) for a wide field of view. If your eyepiece is to small (maybe 15mm or below) you will have too much magnification and the moon will be a blur.

Posted on Aug 11, 2008

  • 67 Answers

SOURCE: telescope is only good for viewing moon...help!!!

your scope is 565mm focal length with a 60mm objective which makes it f:9.5. (telescope focal length divided by lens diameter)
all this means that the optics are capable of viewing larger planets. nebula is a bit of a stretch. maybe under exceptionally dark skies with at least 30min. of dark adaptation. brighter objects like m42 or m31 should be visible, bear in mind that only very large telescopes will resolve the slightest hint of color in nebulosity. the rest of us are reserved to gray scale. i would suggest using a 26mm eyepiece plossl if available. next make sure your finding system is aligned to the scope. this is best done during the day at a distant object like a radio tower. center the object in the eyepiece then align the finder.
next get your self a good sky map like stellarium software a freebie and a fav. to ensure your looking at what you think your looking at.

a word on eyepiece selection. magnification is calculated by dividing the focal length of the scope by the focal length of the eyepiece. for instance the scope is 565mm the recommended eyepiece is 26mm so the magnification would be around 22x.
a rule of thumb for optics is about 50x per inch of objective. which means your scope is good for about 100x. so by the math you would use a 5.6mm e.p. to achieve 100x, however as optical powers increase field of view decreases making it difficult to find objects. find your object with a wide field e.p. then switch to a higher power to zoom in. if the image gets fuzzy at high power attempt to refocus, if it doesn't clean up either your asking a bit to much from the scope or seeing conditions in the upper atmosphere may not be ideal. what ever you do don't give up there are some amazing things to see out there.

Posted on Dec 10, 2008

SOURCE: Re: Bushnell Model No. 78-5500 Banner Astro 280

Here is the Bushnell web site-- possibly you can get this item there--

http://www.bushnell.com/general/telescopes.cfm?section=General%20Use

Posted on Jan 03, 2009

SOURCE: Set up a Jason 307 Explorer Telescope?

Jason and Bushnell are the same company. Here is a list of the manuals. Find your telescope-
http://www.opticsplanet.net/bushnell-warranty.html

Look down the web page.

Posted on Aug 30, 2009

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How do i focus the telescope


  1. Get Stellarium or another fine astronomy program
  2. During the day, point the telescope at a part of the landscape about 100 yards away.
  3. Use the lowest power eyepiece (highest number) in the focal tube.
  4. Center the landscape object in the telescope.
  5. Align the finder scope so that it points exactly where the main telescope is.
  6. At night, leave the scope out to reach thermal equilibrium (about an hour for small reflectors and refractors)
  7. If the scope is on a EQ mount, polar align.
  8. Point the finder at the moon. The moon should be in the main scope also.
  9. Practice finding the moon before you start on the planets
  10. Once you are comfortable with the moon and planets, you can go for the deep sky objects

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  1. Get Stellarium or another fine astronomy program
  2. During the day, point the telescope at a part of the landscape about 100 yards away.
  3. Use the lowest power eyepiece (highest number) in the focal tube.
  4. Center the landscape object in the telescope.
  5. Align the finder scope so that it points exactly where the main telescope is.
  6. At night, leave the scope out to reach thermal equilibrium (about an hour for small reflectors and refractors)
  7. If the scope is on a EQ mount, polar align.
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  1. Get Stellarium or another fine astronomy program
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  3. Use the lowest power eyepiece (highest number) in the focal tube.
  4. Center the landscape object in the telescope.
  5. Align the finder scope so that it points exactly where the main telescope is.
  6. At night, leave the scope out to reach thermal equilibrium (about an hour for small reflectors and refractors)
  7. If the scope is on a EQ mount, polar align.
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  9. Practice finding the moon before you start on the planets
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  1. Get Stellarium or another fine astronomy program
  2. During the day, point the telescope at a part of the landscape about 100 yards away.
  3. Use the lowest power eyepiece (highest number) in the focal tube.
  4. Center the landscape object in the telescope.
  5. Align the finder scope so that it points exactly where the main telescope is.
  6. At night, leave the scope out to reach thermal equilibrium (about an hour for small reflectors and refractors)
  7. If the scope is on a EQ mount, polar align.
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  1. Get Stellarium or another fine astronomy program
  2. During the day, point the telescope at a part of the landscape about 100 yards away.
  3. Use the lowest power eyepiece (highest number) in the focal tube.
  4. Center the landscape object in the telescope.
  5. Align the finder scope so that it points exactly where the main telescope is.
  6. At night, leave the scope out to reach thermal equilibrium (about an hour for small reflectors and refractors)
  7. If the scope is on a EQ mount, polar align.
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I cannot see anything thru my telescope


  1. Get Stellarium or another fine astronomy program
  2. During the day, point the telescope at a part of the landscape about 100 yards away.
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  4. Center the landscape object in the telescope.
  5. Align the finder scope so that it points exactly where the main telescope is.
  6. At night, leave the scope out to reach thermal equilibrium (about an hour for small reflectors and refractors)
  7. If the scope is on a EQ mount, polar align.
  8. Point the finder at the moon. The moon should be in the main scope also.
  9. Practice finding the moon before you start on the planets
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Hi ive got a galaxsee tasco telescope but im having trouble seeing anything at night, i've took all the caps off lined up on a star but its just pitch black can you help thanks.


1. During the day, point the scope towards an object and align the finder scope to the telescope.
2. First object at night should be the moon. it will verify your finderscope alignment and you should have a clear view of the moon.
3. Use your lowest power eyepiece (largest number in mm) and point the finderscope to a star. The star should be in the center of the eyepiece.. If not, adjust the finder until it and the scope are centered.
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1 Answer

I can't see anything out of the large scope


Use the 20mm to view an object (building, tree etc.) far away during the daytime. Align the finderscope to the object.
To view the moon, leave the scope out to equalize the temperature for at least 1/2 hour. Use the 20mm and no barlow. Point the scope towards the moon by sighting along the barrel of the scope, then use the finder to zero in on the moon. You may then switch to the 4mm eyepiece. for a more magnified view of the moon. You will have to keep moving the telescope because of the earth's rotation. The higher the magnification, the more you will have to adjust the scope. Because of the cheap finderscope, finding the planets will be difficult. Best to always sight down the length of the scope to get you close. The planets will be small and indistinct.
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Nothing discourages an amateur astronomer more than a toy store telescope. My advise would be to use this scope for nature watching and go buy a good telescope (Meade, Celestron, Orion etc.). Even Those 60mm refractors are superior to this! A descent scope would cost a minimum of $200

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When i look through the high powered eye peice i can never find the object. i can see colours if i look at buildings and such, but if i try to see a star its just black. i am lining it up right on the...


Telescopes have VERY small fields of view, and YOUR telescope will never reach 375 power.

Why? The maximum magnification of any telescope is 50 times aperture. So a 3 inch scope is 150 power.

Do not try to use max power-- I own several scopes in the 10 inch range, many times larger than your scope. Normally we use from 80-150 power to show objects in the night sky. Remember the scope has a field of view smaller than the tip of your finger held at arm's length!

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