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Artista 640 embroidery unit

I used the wrong embroidery foot when trying to use my embroidery unit. The foot lodged under the hoop and made horrible sounds. yicks. I put on the correct foot and now it will not follow the design accurately. How do I fix this problem? Is it fixable?

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Try shutting down the machine and then start up again.try it also with another design as well. But actually i think you may have done something to the timing. take to a bernina dealer for their service rep to handle. also take the piece you were working on and show them the problem

Posted on May 06, 2008

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Why doesn't it recognize that an embroidery hoop is attached?


Perhaps this will help:

My Embroidery Haven View topic Bernina 180

Bernina artista hoop not recognized

You can also try contacting the Support group at Bernina.com or your local Bernina dealer

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Feb 24, 2016 | Bernina Artista 180

1 Answer

How can I use my Bernina 640 Artista to applique


Perhaps I'm not understanding your question. When doing applique, I use a very tight zigzag stitch with a satin stitch foot or open-toe embroidery foot (so the thickness of the stitches do not create buildup under the presser foot). Set the tension so the bobbin thread stays mostly under the fabric so the top thread is the only thread that shows on the top (sometimes threading the bobbin pigtail will help).

Fuse the cutout fabric to the backing fabric. Then zigzag so the raw edge of the fabric is covered by the zigzag (helps to use a thicker thread so the coverage is easier).

Some newer machines have the ability to miter corners. On my 930, I set the needle position to the outside of the raw edged. Then when I near the corner, I gently, but consistently, narrow the stitch width to an an outside point, since the needle on the outside edge, turn the fabric and gently, but consistently, widen the stitch to full width. This creates a nice mitered corner.

When making curves, stitch small lengths and then sink the needle on the outside of the curve, and gently turn the fabric to follow the curve and repeat while going around the curve.

https://books.google.com/books?id=MQneD8cQ5KAC&pg=PA13&lpg=PA13&dq=mitered+applique+corner&source=bl&ots=1sHsUrkVAz&sig=1WZ-i2-T3RtvUEW797sHxTKiq4E&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiaoZeiwunKAhVslYMKHewdDFEQ6AEIKzAC#v=onepage&q=mitered%20applique%20corner&f=false


How to Appliqu Like Pro Sew4Home (FWIW, IMHO, the satin stitch on the bird is really a poor example. The stitch is not very even at all--could be the sewing machine.)

How to Make and Apply Appliques (The giraffe is a better example, although choosing a simple design to applique usually yields better results.)

Practice, practice, practice!

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Feb 08, 2016 | Bernina Artista 640E Sewing, Quilting and...

1 Answer

How to stich embroidery


That would depend on if you have a regular home sewing machine or a embroidery machine. I'm going to assume that you have a regular machine.

There is something called free hand embroidery. you lower or disengage the feed dogs, take off the presser foot. Some use a darning foot and others just leave the foot off. Hopefully your design is already marked on the fabric. Place fabric in a regular hand embroidery so they fabric is right side up but the hoop makes it sit down in the rings. (make sense) Fit your hoop on the bed of the sewing machine, under the presser foot/presser foot bar. Lower the presser foot lever. (important for tension) and select stitch style and length. you may need to adjust tensions too.

Begin stitching, take a couple stitches... then reverse a couple... then snip the loose ends. Continue to stitch, guiding the hoop so that the needle follows the design. Start slowly and as you discover how your hand movements effect the length of the stitches... you can speed up and slow down as you need to create your design.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ylMy6QdsZr4

Nov 03, 2012 | Sewing Machines

1 Answer

Bernina artista hoop not recognized


Calibrate the embroidery hoop


Note
The embroidery hoop can only be calibrated with the oval hoop.. You'll find the instructions for each machine in the relevant user manual.

Aug 15, 2012 | Bernina Artista 180

1 Answer

Embroidery foot rest on hoop


Have you calibrated your machine to the hoop? Read that part of your user manual, it sounds as if it needs the hoop calibration.
Rick

Apr 07, 2012 | Bernina Artista 180

1 Answer

I have a Bernina 180 with embroidery module. If I upgrade to a Bernina 640, would it work with my 180 module?


Unfortunately no, I think that the 185 and beyond use the same emb module. The 180 if I remember correctly, has the memory and card reader in the module itself and may have a different plug. I do know for sure that the 180 hoops will definitely not fit on the newer modules. Sorry to disapoint, Allen

Feb 03, 2011 | Bernina Artista 180

1 Answer

Machine says that I don't have an embroidery hoop attached, but I do.


First turn off and disconnect embroidery unit and hoop from the machine. Plug machine back in and connect the embroidery unit only and turn the machine on. Reattach the hoop and test to make sure it's secure. Your hoop might not have been attached snuggly enough or you might need to put on the small hoop.

Dec 22, 2009 | Bernina Artista 180

1 Answer

Do I need the embroidery hoop? does it connect to the thing in the back of the machine and moves areouns?


  1. What do I need to get started at free machine embroidery?
    • A zigzag sewing machine with a drop-feed control. (In other words, you have to be able to lower the feed dogs so they don't try to feed the fabric.) It's nice if you can vary the width of your zigzag stitches too.
    • An embroidery foot or needle with embroidery spring. An embroidery foot helps by holding the fabric down against the throat plate while nevertheless being minimal - it lets you see what you're doing because it has very little surface area. You can alternatively get a needle that has a kind of spring built into it, and the spring holds the fabric in place. These can be nice in that they're even more minimal than an embroidery foot, but they're also relatively expensive and if it breaks you have to replace the whole thing instead of using an ordinary cheap needle with the special embroidery foot. If you use the needle with spring, you don't use a presser foot while you embroider.
    • An embroidery hoop. There are two primary kinds of embroidery hoops on the market. The old-fashioned kind, usually made of wood, has an outer ring and an innter ring. You loosen the outer ring, separate the rings, place the fabric over the inner ring, place the outer ring over the fabric, tighten the outer ring, and pull the fabric tight in the hoop. With the modern type hoop, you squeeze a pair of handles on the inner ring to remove it, place the fabric over the outer ring, place the inner ring (still squeezed) into place and release the handles. The more modern hoop is faster and easier. The old-fashioned hoop provides better tension on the fabric.
    • Stabilizer. This helps prevent puckering and slipping while you're embroidering. There are a variety of types out there. Some are papery and are torn away from the embroidery when you're done. Only use that on the back side of the embroidery, as it's almost impossible to get it all off. Others are also papery and also tear away but are dissolvable in cold water, leaving only a few easy-to-remove fibers in the embroidery. Your authors like this type of stabilizer. There is also a transparent plastic-like stabilizer which dissolves completely in water. Your authors have this but haven't tried it yet, but hear it's very nice. It's expensive though.
    • Fabric... of course. Make sure that your embroidery hoop fits on the piece you're going to embroider on. If the piece is to be small, you may want to embroider before cutting the piece from the fabric.
    • Thread. Contrary to popular belief, you can use ordinary polyester all-purpose thread to embroider, but it can weaken the fabric you're embroidering on. (If you do use polyester, you may want to fuse some interfacing to the back of your embroidery when you're done.) There is plenty of gorgeous 100% rayon embroidery thread available.
    • Thread for the bobbin. This won't be seen on the surface, so you can use anything you want. Trying to find a way to get rid of that day-glo orange thread you can't remember why you bought? Stick it in the bobbin when you embroider. Some embroiderers feel that it's best to use a softer thread (like 100% cotton) in the bobbin so as to reduce the possibility that the bobbin thread will break the embroidery thread, but your authors haven't had a problem with this to date.
  2. How do I prepare the machine and fabric for free machine embroidery? Drop the feed dogs and set the stitch length at zero. (If you can't set the stitch length at zero, don't panic, it's not that important.) Install the fabric in the embroidery hoop (with any stabilizer[s] you intend to use) so that the surface of the fabric is at the *bottom* of the hoop. (Note that if you're used to embroidering or cross stich by hand, this means you're putting the fabric in the hoop backwards.) When you place the hoop on the table such that the fabric surface rests on the table, the right side of the fabric should face up. Install the embroidery foot or special embroidery needle with spring on the sewing machine. If you're using the special needle, remove the presser foot. Place the embroidery hoop in the sewing area. (Some machines can't lift the presser foot enough to admit some hoops - you may have to remove the presser foot temporarily, position the hoop, and then re-install the presser foot if you're using one.) Set the sewing machine for a straight stitch. Reduce the upper tension until stitches interlock below the fabric instead of above or inside it.
  3. How do I lock the thread at the beginning and end of my embroidery so it doesn't begin to unravel? Make several stitches in place to lock the thread.

Nov 13, 2009 | Janome Memory Craft 9000 Computerized...

3 Answers

The carriage of the embroidery unit is not move automatically to the embroidering standby position.


Is the need in upright position ?

or have you fitted the embroidery hoop correctly.
If all else fails switch off and start up again - should then automatically go to correct position.

May 16, 2008 | Singer CE-200 Quantum Futura Computerized...

1 Answer

180E Hoop problem


Joan, there are 3 micrositches on your embroidery unit arm. these switches are depressed when you attach the hoops, it appears from your comments that one switch is not functioning. This could be simple, it is out of alignment or more complex it is broken. Either way you need to take it to a professional for repair.

Dec 21, 2007 | Bernina Artista 180

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