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Is there away of fixing the power supply? It has stopped working and the fan is not working either.

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  • dinks9683 Apr 30, 2008

    I don't! I bought a new one. Thank you

  • john wasson
    john wasson May 11, 2010

    how well do u know electronics?

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You have to buy a new power supply component if it's not working. If you do get the power supply and your fan is not working, DO NOT USE YOUR COMPUTER UNTIL YOU HAVE AN APPROPRIATE FAN WORKING.

Posted on Apr 29, 2008

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Fan on VGC-LA1


The PC has two faand is It depends upon which fan is faulty,
The CPU fan is easily replaced, but the fan in the switch mode power supply is a lot more difficult and I recommend you get a PC service shop to fix this fan or replace the switch mode power supply.

Oct 14, 2012 | Sony VAIO PC Desktops

3 Answers

I cannot start my eMachine ET181003r. Every time I try to start, just hear humming sound for one second and then stop. I am not sure it is the FAN problem or not.


What you are most likely hearing is either one of the fans within the computer case, or a Hard drive. The problem could be many things and would most likely need to be inspected in person. I am sorry I cannot be of more help in this situation. Good luck!

Dec 23, 2010 | eMachines ET181003R PC Desktop

1 Answer

Packard bell imedia 1402 will not boot up power button is flashing amber twice every second also amber led right hand corner on motherboard


Sorry, I stepped out. Otherwise I would have answered right away.

Your power supply changes your household, (Residential),or business electricity, into three main voltages. Also converts it from AC to DC electricity.

1) 3.3 Volts
2) 5 Volts
3) 12 Volts

Each one of these voltages is a voltage power rail.
There's more involved than that, but for ease of explanation, we'll let this suffice.

A) Orange wires are 3.3 Volts. ( 3 and 3/10ths Volts. Sometimes the decimal point is hard to see on here )

B) Red = 5 volts

C) Yellow = 12 Volts

The only power cable you're going to be switching around, in my thoughts, is a 4-pin peripheral power cable.
Has a 4-pin Molex connector on the end.

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#peripheral

Note that there is one Yellow wire, one Red wire, and two Black wires.

If you have a bad 5 volt power rail, or a bad 12 volt power rail, all the peripheral power cables will be effected.

Won't do you any good changing them out.

They all derive their power from the same source.

I understand your reasoning, and it looks logical, huh? But as you can now see, it doesn't affect anything changing peripheral cables around.

The blinking Power On light indicates you have a bad power supply.
I can't find any documentation on Packard Bell's website to give you, to substantiate my statement to you.

Otherwise I would.

To test my claim.
Do you have another power supply of the same style, and has the right amount of power cables? Also should be at least 200 watt.
You're just going to use it for a test, not as a replacement power supply.

No?

You could conduct a voltage test of the power supply, but if the fan doesn't even spin, the power supply is kaput.

Does the power supply's fan spin?
If so we can go on to do a voltage test.

This will require a multimeter.
The multimeter is set to the 0-50 Volts DC scale.

An economical, but decent enough multimeter, can be purchased in a multitude of places.

An auto parts store is one place.
Radio Shack is another.
There are several stores that carry affordable ones.

Average price for a decent enough multimeter for this test is around $10 to $15.

If you do not wish to use a multimeter, there is also the option of using a simple to use power supply tester.

This is one example, and an example of where to purchase it,

http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=1647108&CatId=1107

Again, this is if the fan on the power supply spins. There is the rare occasion that the fan on the power supply will fail, and the power supply will work, but this is not one of those rare occasions.

Also, if the power supply fan spins a few times, then stops, the power supply is shot.

What leads to power supply failure?

A) The power supply was a low quality item installed by the computer manufacturer.
Saved the manufacturer money.

50 cents to a dollar saved, times 50,000 computers, or more of that model, adds up in a hurry.

B) The computer is dirty inside. Computers need to be kept clean on the inside, as well as their power supply's, on a regular basis.

Inside a Power Supply is a Heatsink, or more than one Heatsink.
A Heatsink is typically constructed of a flat metal base, that has tall fins protruding up from the base.

The metal base absorbs heat from whatever object is placed against it, and the heat is radiated up into the fins, where it is dissipated away.

Air flows through the fins, and helps carry the heat away.
(There is a Heatsink on top of the Processor also)

A Power Supply also has a fan.
The fan draws air into the Power Supply through the computer case, then pushes the air out of the back of the computer case.

The air drawn in through the computer case, helps to keep the hardware components inside the computer case cool, as well as the other fans that are implemented. (Computer case fan/s, Processor fan)

It also helps to keep the hardware components inside the Power Supply cool.

When the Heatsink fins are clogged with gunk, and the fan's blades, center hub, and surrounding shroud, are clogged with gunk, the cooling capacity of the Power Supply drops tremendously.

The Power Supply hardware components heat up.

Heat = Wasted Energy
The Power Supply tries to keep up with the demand for power, but with the energy loss due to excessive heat, the Power Supply hardware components eventually fail.

Typical SMPS used in a computer. (Personal Computer)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Switched-mode_power_supply


Mar 05, 2010 | PC Desktops

2 Answers

Problem with Toshiba Equium Laptop which is switching itself off. even when connected to mains supply Is this a problem with the switch or power supply? Hope you can help thanks


If the laptop shuts down and won't boot up straight away, then the problem could be an overheating CPU problem. It could be a faulty fan and/or the fan and heatsink assembly is clogged with dust.
Check the fan and if it has stopped spinning then replace it and if the fan and heatsink is clogged with dust, loosen the dust and remove it.

Sep 28, 2009 | Toshiba Equium 3300M PC Desktop

4 Answers

Dell dimension 4700 power supply fan has gotten very loud


i'm not sure whats wrong with it put it maybe that the bearings in the fan are bad i suggest that you get a new fan:)

Jan 04, 2009 | Dell Dimension 4700 PC Desktop

2 Answers

The power light keeps flashing orange


I had my Optiplex GX520 at work shut down abruptly every time I turned it on it in the morning. This would always happen within the first 30 minutes. I would then get the flashing amber light. After starting the PC again, it would stay on all day (over 8 hours) without shutting down again. I found that the power supply was over-heating.

Two things need to be done. First, in order to get the amber light to stop flashing, un-plug the computer from the wall for 30 seconds then plug it back in. OR hold down the power button for 10 seconds or so. The light should stop flashing. Then press the power button again and the PC should start.

But why did it abruptly shut down in the first place? The power supply has a fan-speed-control circuit in it to keep it running slow and quiet when the power supply is cool. It gives the power supply lower voltage when the power supply is cold and higher voltage as the power supply gets warmer. This circuit either is not working correctly or the fan getting sticky over the years and needing more voltage to get it moving when it is cold. I found that the fan was not starting at all and causing the power supply to over-heat.


To keep the fan moving at full speed, I cut the wire to it and wired it to the +12v output directly. Not the fan goes at full speed all the time. And yes, it is nosier. But at work it doesn’t matter.

The best solution would be to just get another power supply from Dell if possible. Or buy a +12v, 70mm fan from Digi-Key and replace the original.

Jun 27, 2008 | PC Desktops

2 Answers

Fan is continually running


Some are controlled by a thermostat. It could be the thermostat isn't working. It also depends on what the temperature of the room is that you have it in. If the room doesn't have air conditioning, chances are it needs the fan.

One way to try to cut the noise is try to clean the dust out of the fans and power supply by taking and air compressor or using some canned air. You should be very care when using the air compressor to make sure that you don't knock off any components.

Insect your fans and power supply. There are less noiser ones you can find at a computer store for a reasonable price. It could be the bearings are bad on a fan as well. If you replace it, the noise will go away.


Good luck on that.

Jun 10, 2008 | Dell OptiPlex 170L PC Desktop

2 Answers

Comp makes a buzz noise and wont show any start up


Suggest you,

A) Look at the back of the computer at the Power Supply fan, and tell me if it's spinning. (Where the power cord plugs in, is the Power Supply)

B) Open the computer case, look at the Processor fan, and tell me if it is spinning.

Also is the computer dirty inside, as well as inside the Power Supply?

DO NOT touch anything inside the computer until it is unplugged from power, and you have followed Anti-Static precautions.

From there I would diagnose the Power Supply. The Compaq Presario s3310cl desktop computer, came with a generic wimpy 200 Watt power supply.

HP Support > Compaq Presario s3310cl desktop computer > Specifications,

http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?docname=c00003124&tmp_task=prodinfoCategory&lc=en&dlc=en&cc=us&lang=en&product=311347

Back when the Power Supply was made power supply manufacturers were 'fudging' the actual maximum Wattage rating.

True Wattage rating is more like 60 percent of what is stated.
120 Watts.

My belief at this point of the diagnoses due to your brief statement, is that the computer is dirty inside, and the Power Supply has gone to the great power supply graveyard.

(Bad Power Supply)

Even if the Power On LED is lit, fans are spinning, and the Power Supply fan is running, you may have a bad Power Supply.

Weak Voltage power rail.

1) ALL the LED lights use less than 1 Watt of power.

2) EACH fan uses 2 to 3 Watts.

3) A typical Processor can use 51 to 125 Watts.
(General statement. Older CPU's use less power)

The Compaq Presario s3310cl uses an Intel Pentium 4, that fits in a Socket 478 processor socket, and at maximum capability, operates at a 2.53GigaHertz frequency rate.
(2.53GHz)

When operating at the maximum frequency rate it can use up to 61.5 Watts.

1) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Intel_Pentium_4_microprocessors#Northwood_.28130.C2.A0nm.29

(sSpec Number - SL6D8)

2) Socket 478 processor socket,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Socket_478

(In the HP Support Product Specifications, it's listed to the right of the heading - Processor Architecture.
mPGA478 )

No Processor running, No computer.
No computer operating = No Signal on the monitor, or a black monitor screen.

The SMPS in your computer (Switched Mode Power Supply) has two cooling components.

1) The Fan

2) Heatsink's used inside.

Typical construction of a Heatsink, is a plate of metal with tall, thin fins protruding from it.

The plate of metal absorbs heat from whatever object it is placed against.
The tall, thin fins then absorb the heat from the plate of metal, whereby the fins radiate the heat away.

If a fan is used in conjunction with a Heatsink, (Such as a Power Supply, or Processor for example), the air flow from the fan helps to carry heat away from the fins.

Heat = Wasted Energy

The more heat developed inside the Power Supply, the more the Power Supply strains to keep up with the call for power.
Eventually components inside the Power Supply fail, and the Power Supply itself fails.

Doesn't take very much 'Gunk' on the fan, and Heatsink's inside the Power Supply, to make the cooling capacity of these two cooling components, drop tremendously.

SMPS,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Switched-mode_power_supply

Basic typical construction of an SMPS, is shown to the upper right of the page in a photo.
You can left-click on the photo to enlarge. You can enlarge twice.

This is NOT, I repeat NOT, an advertisement to open the Power Supply!

If there are any Electrolytic Capacitors that are still good in that Power Supply, they can release their charge to you!

Electrolytic Capacitors are designed to slowly build up a charge, then release it all at once.

You can compare them, to a large swimming pool being filled up slowly by a garden hose, then one wall of the pool is taken down all at once.

Once power is removed from an Electrolytic Capacitor, (Such as unplugging a Power Supply from power), they can hold a charge for weeks, months, or sometimes over a year.

If your finger/s, touch the terminals on the bottom of a Radial Aluminum Electrolytic Capacitor, the charge could be released to you!

If your finger/s, touch a circuit that one, or more Radial Aluminum Electrolytic Capacitors are in, the charge could be released to you!

The shock can range from Bad to FATAL.

[Anti-Static precautions:

Your body carries Static electricity.
Static WILL fry out (Short Circuit) the hardware components inside a computer.

Work on a table. Computer unplugged from power, computer case open.
TOUCH the metal frame of the open computer case to relieve your body of Static, BEFORE you reach inside. (Not shouting)

If you get up in the middle of working on your computer, and walk away, upon your return be Sure to touch the metal frame again ]

You can reply to me by clicking on Comment.
Believe upper right of your page.

May 15, 2008 | PC Desktops

1 Answer

Hp pavillion dv6262eu=====dv6000 underneath also ,,,, has been away for repairs 3 times now in 12 months cooling fan runs at half speed whist operating at all times is...


Most likely a power supply problem. Your power supply is probably going bad or not powerful enough for your system. Swap it out for a known working power supply with enough power for your system. Also make sure there is not excessive dust and dirt on the fans.

May 09, 2008 | PC Desktops

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