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Using a Sata Drive with an IDE cable

I have an older HP system that needs a new hard drive. Even when I format the old done, it won't load. can I put in a SATA drive when the old one was a an IDE? Or do I need a different cable?

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Hi , your old hard disk is a IDE drive and you are also using a sata . Both of the cables are different. if you are using the windows operating system , start menu , run and type chkdsk it show the bad sector on your hard disk . if your hard drive have more bad sector on the disk it won't load any on the specific part of the drive .if there is no bad sectors then change the cable of IDE power cable and bus cable . if the problem presist please inform again.

Posted on Apr 28, 2008

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Depending on how old your system is, even though your current drive is IDE, there might still be SATA support on the motherboard. Look in your manual and find out if it has any SATA connectors. If not, you need to continue using IDE unless you want to purchase a PCI card with SATA connectors on it.

Posted on Apr 28, 2008

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Hi. How to find files/Doc was format in HP Pavilion dv6


This kind of problem sometimes happens if the operating system files to start up on your laptop hard drive get corrupted. See if you can find instructions on youtube to take the hard drive out of your laptop, or see if there is a screw that holds it in your laptop. You will need to purchase a USB to IDE/SATA cable adapter to connect your laptop hard drive to another, working computer. Once the screw is out, and you remove the laptop hard drive, then plug one cable (IDE/SATA) into your hard drive, and the other end (USB) to the second computer that is working. You will also need to connect a power cable from your laptop hard drive to a separate power supply that comes in the USB to IDE/SATA cable kit. When the cables are connected, if your hard drive is usable, you should be able to see all the files from your laptop hard drive on the second computer. Now, you can copy them off before reinstalling your operating system/formatting your original laptop hard drive.

May 07, 2015 | HP Pavilion dv6-7010us Entertainment...

Tip

How to replace a hard disk drive.


Step 1: Back up and scout around
First, back up your critical files (don't forget your Outlook .PST archive) to optical discs, an external drive, or online storage. Then check whether a CD comes with the drive, providing drive-specific information and general upgrade assistance. It may also later help you copy the contents of one drive to another. Install this software first. Then, power down your PC, unplug all cables, and open the case. Next, ground yourself by touching a metal portion of the chassis.
Look inside—your first task is to determine where your new drive will go. Bays for internal drives are usually located below the wider, front-accessible bays that house CD or DVD drives. If you plan to replace your boot drive with the new drive and don't have an empty bay, your upgrade will involve more steps than we can cover here. But if you're replacing your boot drive and you have an empty bay, follow our steps for adding a second drive. After formatting it, use Norton Ghost (or a similar program) to clone your boot drive's contents to the new drive. Then, revisit steps 3 and 4 to direct your PC to boot from the new drive.
We'll be installing a SATA drive, but the process is similar for the other common drive type, IDE. SATA drives use a thin, seven-pin data cable; IDE drives use a 40-pin ribbon cable that's usually gray. If you're unsure which drive type your PC already has, check its documentation or label. Most PCs more than a year or two old employ IDE hard and optical drives, and don't support SATA unless they have a SATA PCI card installed. More-recent desktops may use (or just support) SATA drives but should support IDE, too.
Tip: If you transfer Windows XP from one drive to another, you may have to reauthorize Windows. Step 2: Examine data and power connections
Most hard drive kits include a data cable (SATA or IDE, depending on the drive), a power adapter cable (with some SATA drives), and screws. If yours doesn't include cables, you can purchase them separately.
First, the data connection. If you're installing a SATA drive as secondary storage, follow the data cable from your current drive (assuming it's SATA, too) to the other end. See if an unused SATA port lies nearby on the motherboard or an interface card. If you can't find one, consult your PC's documentation.
If you're adding an IDE drive as a second drive, you may be able to connect it to the same data cable as your primary IDE drive, or along with an IDE optical drive. Look for a third, free connector in the middle of the cable that connects your currently installed IDE drive to the motherboard. Note that some older PCs use 40-conductor IDE cables, not the 80-conductor ones current drives require. (Compare your kit cable to the one installed—the 80-conductor variety has much thinner wires.) 80-conductor cables are backward-compatible (both types use the same 40-pin connector), so you can swap out a 40-conductor cable for your kit's 80 if need be. (The "master" drive goes at the end—see step 3.)
Next, consider the power connection. Our SATA drive has a 15-pin SATA power connector. If you already have a SATA drive installed, follow its power cable (the wider of the two connectors) to see if an unused power-supply lead with the same connector is nearby. If so, earmark that lead for your new drive. If it can't reach the empty bay, see if any bundled adapters help.
Some SATA drives also support familiar legacy Molex four-pin power connectors—you can use a Molex or SATA connector. If so, hunt for a free Molex-style lead. Still no match? Then you'll need an adapter, such as a Molex-to-SATA adapter (some kits bundle one), or a Y-adapter that splits a lead in two.
IDE drives are simpler: They always use Molex connectors. You just need a free Molex-style lead (or a Y-splitter). Step 3: Mount and connect the drive
When installing SATA drives, jumper settings usually aren't an issue. That's not true of IDE, where a jumper indicates whether a drive is a primary ("master") or secondary ("slave") drive. Check its documentation for the proper setting. If your PC has only one IDE hard drive, it's probably set to "master." Assuming you chain another IDE drive off its cable, the new drive should be set to "slave." (You'll later have to change the jumper to "master"—and attach the drive to the cable's end—if you remove the original boot drive and make the new drive the boot drive.) Another option: Set both IDE drives on an 80-conductor cable to the Cable Select (CSEL) jumper setting. The PC will determine master/slave status according to the drives' placement on the cable ("master" at the end, "slave" in the middle).
Next, look at your current hard drive to see if mounting rails are attached to its sides. If so, screw a set onto the new drive (look inside the case for spares), then slide the drive into its bay. Otherwise, screw it directly into the bay. Four screws are sufficient. Usually, the label side points up; mimic the boot drive.
Attach one end of the SATA data cable (which is keyed for correct insertion) to a SATA port on the motherboard or interface card, the other to the drive. IDE data cables, also keyed, usually have a red stripe that lines up with the "pin 1" marking on the drive.
Next, plug the power-supply lead (keyed, too) that you scouted out in step 2 into the drive, including any necessary extender or adapter. Then close the case. Step 4: Configure the BIOS
Next, boot into your PC's BIOS-setup utility to verify that it recognizes the new drive and positions it correctly in the drive hierarchy. (Check your PC's startup screen to determine which key launches the utility.) Once there, also check that "auto-detect" is selected for the drives, if an option. If the utility lets you select the boot order, give your intended boot drive priority over any other hard drive. This information may be under Boot Options, Boot Order, or Boot Sequence.
Save changes and exit the utility. Your PC will reboot.
Tip: Using a SATA PCI interface card? It may have its own BIOS to check. Step 5: Partition and format your hard drive
Our PC runs Windows XP, which lets you partition and format drives within Windows. Older Windows versions, such as 98 and Me, make you do this from DOS.
With XP and 2000, though, use Windows' Disk Management utility. Click Start > Control Panel > Administrative Tools > Computer Management, and choose Disk Management from the tree at left. Your new drive should appear, with a black bar indicating it isn't partitioned. Right-click the bar, and choose New Partition to launch the New Partition wizard.
Click Next, and check that Primary Partition is selected; click Next again, to the Specify Partition Size screen (don't change the partition size in the "Partition size in MB" field); and click Next to advance to another screen, on which "Assign the following drive letter" should be selected. Click Next yet again (to the Format Partition screen), and ensure that "Format this partition with the following settings" is selected and that the "File system" drop-down reads "NTFS." Click Next a final time, hit Finish, and formatting begins.
Formatting could take an hour or more, depending on drive capacity. But don't be surprised if your formatted drive has less capacity than the package claims. A 320GB drive, for instance, formats to about 300GB. Drive manufacturers advertise preformatted size, but a portion of the drive is inaccessible.

on Jul 21, 2010 | Computers & Internet

2 Answers

I have a Dell Dimension E520 running Windows XP. I have a Seagate Barracuda 7200.7 100 gb Ultra ATA hard drive (model number ST3100011A) with IDE connections (taken from an old Emachines). The plan was...


One bad lead can cause a computer to continue on a cycle or to shutdown or fail to detect your hard drive
Test the leads that attach to your ((hard drive from the motherboard)) or replace all the leads that attach to your hard drive including electrical extensions + IDE,SATA and the ones that attach from your ((motherboard to hard drive))
make sure all leads that are attached to your drives dvd\cd 3 1/2 inch floppy have secure connections and are not faulty even the electrical extensions or just replace them they are probably old and faulty a computer needs its connections to have an end so any faulty leads will end up with a computer error


hope this helps

Jan 22, 2011 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

I hook up the sata bridge adaptor and my computer is not reconizing the the hard drive is even there i can hook it up to ide and it works fine just wont work with the bridge


The bridge has a jumper I believe next to where the powerplug is. This jumper must be pulled out and put on the A-B NOT the A-C if youare going to use the IDE ribbon cable. Another trick is do not use the IDEcable (extra) that you may have with or below or above your other harddrivesince bios will always keep trying to go to your SATA drive even when youchange your primary drive with working operating system to slave and changeboot order....will just show on screen something like no boot disc. The easiestway without messing with the bios and drivers and all is this....move jumper toA-C then use one of the IDE cables that you have (you should have 2) of youCD-ROM. If you are using 2 CD-ROM's remove one and plug this IDE cable intoyour SATA bridge. The computer will now find new hardware. Then right clickthat new found drive when you click "My Computer" from"Start" and "Format" it, just to make sure everything is off thedrive even if new it will not hurt. Not sure if you want your SATA to be yourprimary drive but if you do,you now can use Acronis Ghost software or other tomirror your primary drive onto your new SATA. Once done take out or dissconnectyour primary drive and install your SATA into that slot or above or below yourprimary drive if you have available room in your tower then hook that IDE cableto your SATA and hook power. BAM.. your computer will now use the SATA to bootup and all is fine. Remember SATA does not have slave/master jumpers like IDEdrives. Now if anything happens to that SATA you still have you disconnectedprimary drive to fall back on. If your concerned about wanting 2 drives you maybe able to take your original primary drive and change that jumper from Masterto Slave.Since bios will default to your new SATA drive now and use that hasyour master and boot up from that drive. If you do not want to use yourSATA as your primary without installing an operating system or usingghost/mirror software then to make life easier just use the IDE cable from oneof the CD-ROM's or get an extension IDE cable that will reach since your SATAdrive is smaller and most likely will not neatly fit into the CD-ROM slots. Youcan use the extra slot if you have one above or below your primary drive yourusing now, then plug your CD-ROM IDE cable (with extension if needed to reach)into SATA and then you can now use the SATA to send files and anything else youwant to store in that drive. Hope this helps.

Dec 29, 2010 | Kingwin SATA to IDE Bridge Board (ADP06)...

1 Answer

How do i install a new hard drive in my computer sata hard drive dell gx250 system


u first need to check what HDD is in there....if it's SATA or IDE...
remove the old disk and replace it with a new drive, remove the cables that connect the disk, one for data and another for power...
connect them to the new drive.....
before doing this ensure you have removed all the power and power cables from the PC...
reconnect and install new OS, partition the disk as per requirements, format the new disks and each of the partition, load the new OS
for more info visit my site
www.sureshayyar.110mb.com

Sep 25, 2010 | Dell Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Installation of a 2nd hard drive steps & tips


Step 1: Back up and scout around

First, back up your critical files (don't forget your Outlook .PST archive) to optical discs, an external drive, or online storage. Then check whether a CD comes with the drive, providing drive-specific information and general upgrade assistance. It may also later help you copy the contents of one drive to another. Install this software first. Then, power down your PC, unplug all cables, and open the case. Next, ground yourself by touching a metal portion of the chassis.

Look inside—your first task is to determine where your new drive will go. Bays for internal drives are usually located below the wider, front-accessible bays that house CD or DVD drives. If you plan to replace your boot drive with the new drive and don't have an empty bay, your upgrade will involve more steps than we can cover here. But if you're replacing your boot drive and you have an empty bay, follow our steps for adding a second drive. After formatting it, use Norton Ghost (or a similar program) to clone your boot drive's contents to the new drive. Then, revisit steps 3 and 4 to direct your PC to boot from the new drive.

We'll be installing a SATA drive, but the process is similar for the other common drive type, IDE. SATA drives use a thin, seven-pin data cable; IDE drives use a 40-pin ribbon cable that's usually gray. If you're unsure which drive type your PC already has, check its documentation or label. Most PCs more than a year or two old employ IDE hard and optical drives, and don't support SATA unless they have a SATA PCI card installed. More-recent desktops may use (or just support) SATA drives but should support IDE, too.

Tip: If you transfer Windows XP from one drive to another, you may have to reauthorize Windows.

Step 2: Examine data and power connections


Most hard drive kits include a data cable (SATA or IDE, depending on the drive), a power adapter cable (with some SATA drives), and screws. If yours doesn't include cables, you can purchase them separately.

First, the data connection. If you're installing a SATA drive as secondary storage, follow the data cable from your current drive (assuming it's SATA, too) to the other end. See if an unused SATA port lies nearby on the motherboard or an interface card. If you can't find one, consult your PC's documentation.

If you're adding an IDE drive as a second drive, you may be able to connect it to the same data cable as your primary IDE drive, or along with an IDE optical drive. Look for a third, free connector in the middle of the cable that connects your currently installed IDE drive to the motherboard. Note that some older PCs use 40-conductor IDE cables, not the 80-conductor ones current drives require. (Compare your kit cable to the one installed—the 80-conductor variety has much thinner wires.) 80-conductor cables are backward-compatible (both types use the same 40-pin connector), so you can swap out a 40-conductor cable for your kit's 80 if need be. (The "master" drive goes at the end—see step 3.)

Next, consider the power connection. Our SATA drive has a 15-pin SATA power connector. If you already have a SATA drive installed, follow its power cable (the wider of the two connectors) to see if an unused power-supply lead with the same connector is nearby. If so, earmark that lead for your new drive. If it can't reach the empty bay, see if any bundled adapters help.

Some SATA drives also support familiar legacy Molex four-pin power connectors—you can use a Molex or SATA connector. If so, hunt for a free Molex-style lead. Still no match? Then you'll need an adapter, such as a Molex-to-SATA adapter (some kits bundle one), or a Y-adapter that splits a lead in two.

IDE drives are simpler: They always use Molex connectors. You just need a free Molex-style lead (or a Y-splitter).

Step 3: Mount and connect the drive



When installing SATA drives, jumper settings usually aren't an issue. That's not true of IDE, where a jumper indicates whether a drive is a primary ("master") or secondary ("slave") drive. Check its documentation for the proper setting. If your PC has only one IDE hard drive, it's probably set to "master." Assuming you chain another IDE drive off its cable, the new drive should be set to "slave." (You'll later have to change the jumper to "master"—and attach the drive to the cable's end—if you remove the original boot drive and make the new drive the boot drive.) Another option: Set both IDE drives on an 80-conductor cable to the Cable Select (CSEL) jumper setting. The PC will determine master/slave status according to the drives' placement on the cable ("master" at the end, "slave" in the middle).

Next, look at your current hard drive to see if mounting rails are attached to its sides. If so, screw a set onto the new drive (look inside the case for spares), then slide the drive into its bay. Otherwise, screw it directly into the bay. Four screws are sufficient. Usually, the label side points up; mimic the boot drive.

Attach one end of the SATA data cable (which is keyed for correct insertion) to a SATA port on the motherboard or interface card, the other to the drive. IDE data cables, also keyed, usually have a red stripe that lines up with the "pin 1" marking on the drive.

Next, plug the power-supply lead (keyed, too) that you scouted out in step 2 into the drive, including any necessary extender or adapter. Then close the case.

Step 4: Configure the BIOS

Next, boot into your PC's BIOS-setup utility to verify that it recognizes the new drive and positions it correctly in the drive hierarchy. (Check your PC's startup screen to determine which key launches the utility.) Once there, also check that "auto-detect" is selected for the drives, if an option. If the utility lets you select the boot order, give your intended boot drive priority over any other hard drive. This information may be under Boot Options, Boot Order, or Boot Sequence.

Save changes and exit the utility. Your PC will reboot.

Tip: Using a SATA PCI interface card? It may have its own BIOS to check.

Step 5: Partition and format your hard drive


Our PC runs Windows XP, which lets you partition and format drives within Windows. Older Windows versions, such as 98 and Me, make you do this from DOS.

With XP and 2000, though, use Windows' Disk Management utility. Click Start > Control Panel > Administrative Tools > Computer Management, and choose Disk Management from the tree at left. Your new drive should appear, with a black bar indicating it isn't partitioned. Right-click the bar, and choose New Partition to launch the New Partition wizard.



Click Next, and check that Primary Partition is selected; click Next again, to the Specify Partition Size screen (don't change the partition size in the "Partition size in MB" field); and click Next to advance to another screen, on which "Assign the following drive letter" should be selected. Click Next yet again (to the Format Partition screen), and ensure that "Format this partition with the following settings" is selected and that the "File system" drop-down reads "NTFS." Click Next a final time, hit Finish, and formatting begins.

Formatting could take an hour or more, depending on drive capacity. But don't be surprised if your formatted drive has less capacity than the package claims. A 320GB drive, for instance, formats to about 300GB. Drive manufacturers advertise preformatted size, but a portion of the drive is inaccessible.

Dec 27, 2009 | HP Pavilion a1410n (ER890AA) PC Desktop

2 Answers

How do you connect two hard drives to one computer?


You can easily connect two hard drives to one computer.You can add another hard drive to another port in IDE cable where the first hard drive plugged. thats it .one is primary and other is secondary.

Oct 12, 2009 | Maxtor Hard Drive

2 Answers

What is this system ide or ?? looking to purchase a hard drive (500gb) and a new CD & DVD burner.. Just don't want to buy the wrong item.


What mother board is it? you have sata and ide drives.. new technology is sata which is connected with sata cable to *********** board and appropriate pover coard, the older teconlogy is ide, which is connected with ide (master slave) cable frm you motehr board to you drive... just post what mother board and i could be more specific...

Jun 28, 2009 | HP Pavilion a705w PC Desktop

1 Answer

Updat to new sata hard drive from old idie hard drive.wont reconi


Hi, you will need to load the sata raid drivers when installing the OS. Some off the older versions of xp will not have these, when windows is installing it will ask if you need to install a 3rd party raid driver press F6. later on it will ask you to insert the raid driver disk. which you may have to do/make yourself if you haven't already got one.

Mar 01, 2009 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Connecting new hard drive


If the old one is still conected you can connect it the same way if not here is how to::

Well firstly they are 2 types IDE (large connector) and SATA (small connector)

IDE

of an ide cable has 3 jacks 1 for the main board and 2 for IDE drives
2 drive must be set to master and the other to slave
Set the drives by using the jumper on the back the instructions are written on the drives
Connect the Ide Cable and then the power and turn you system on

IF ITS SATA
connect the sata cable to both hard drive and main board
connect the power cable and your done!!

NB:: sata ports are labeled SATA 1 SATA 2 etc

IDE are LABELED IDE 1 IDE 2

Ide is a large grey cable black connector SATA is usually orange or red and small

Oct 26, 2008 | Gateway (M520HD80G) Hard Drive

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