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Will not re-boot

Hi

This is what my screen has displayed after the bios check Warning!! some changes in the chipset or clock setting caused boot failure.Defaults for thses setting have been loaded Please help

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Enter the bios setup and put the setting for default, save it by pressing F10 and exit by saying yes to save the changes.
hope so the things will work out if its not the software problem.

Posted on Apr 28, 2008

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Backing up cmos settings


no you do not ..The bios settings will not be erased when you change the battery but will turn to default settings ..This is usually the setting used in this cases..
change the battery (only in case it does not hold settings and file associations or the date and clock ..if does that it needs to be changed )
After changing it ..just reboot ..it will ask for F1 to go to setting and select the date and time ..and save changes with F10 and restart ..if it does not boot and it says it has no hard disk ..or not detected..it means you have a hard disk on sata bus..and you need to make some adjustments in Bios settings ..Open bios by pressing the del button on start or if it is a hap ...press F10 or what is indicated on screen ..and in there select the hard disk in boot sector as first boot device ..than in advanced settings look for it ..and under sata settings ..remove the ahci mode and use sata as ide or ide mode or ide compatible ..cause your system may not have the driver for ahci ..and this can be the only issue ..Let me know if you have any problems ..

Dec 17, 2011 | HP Compaq Business d530 PC Desktop

Tip

10 reasons why PCs crash-You must know tip 3


3 BIOS settings

Every motherboard is supplied with a range of chipset settings that are decided in the factory. A common way to access these settings is to press the F2 or delete button during the first few seconds of a boot-up.

Once inside the BIOS, great care should be taken. It is a good idea to write down on a piece of paper all the settings that appear on the screen. That way, if you change something and the computer becomes more unstable, you will know what settings to revert to.

A common BIOS error concerns the CAS latency. This refers to the Ram. Older EDO (extended data out) Ram has a CAS latency of 3. Newer SDRam has a CAS latency of 2. Setting the wrong figure can cause the Ram to lock up and freeze the computer's display.

Mcft Windows is better at allocating IRQ numbers than any BIOS. If possible set the IRQ numbers to Auto in the BIOS. This will allow Windows to allocate the IRQ numbers (make sure the BIOS setting for Plug and Play OS is switched to 'yes' to allow Windows to do this.).

on Mar 04, 2010 | PC Desktops

1 Answer

How do i reset my computer to an earlier date?


Most computers have a RTC or "real time clock" in the BIOS. BIOS (or "Basic Input Output System") controls how data gets into and out from the processor (via keyboard, disk, etc.). Be careful making changes. The BIOS is normally only accessable when the computer is powered on or reset, and then only while performing the POST (or "Power On Self Test"). At this time your screen may display text describing memory, drives, controllers, etc. Some machine have a "silent boot" enabled which displays a manufacturer's graphic or logo instead of this data. It is during this time the the BIOS may be accessed. Depending on the manufacturer of your computer, a key (Delete, Escape, F1 or some other) or key combination (ALT + F1, ALT + S, or some other) will be needed. It is required to press the key or key combination prior to the Operating System loading message(s). This can be done be repeatedly pressing the key (or key combination) once every second (or two) during the POST. Holding the key(s) down the entire time - or pressing them too often will result in an error, and require starting over again.

Once the BIOS screen is presented, you will have to scroll the entire page(s) to find the clock. Most BIOS brands have more than just a single page of settings. Using the the up, down, left, right, PgUp, PgDn & Enter keys - navigate to the clock hours and minutes and adjust as needed. Make sure that you SAVE changes before exiting the BIOS screen. Upon exit, the computer will reboot with your settings.

Your Operating System may also provide a way for you to change the system time (and date) as well. Try clicking on the time / date to see if it will bring up a dialog box that allows you to make the change.

I hope this helps and good luck! If my answer was helpful, please rate it "4 thumbs up" Thanks!

Jul 27, 2011 | PC Desktops

1 Answer

I need to enable AHCI to my dell optiplex GX280 with the BIOS version A08


Hi Jordan,
You should be able to access your BIOS setting when you first turn on the pc. The first screen you see will tell you (briefly) to push either the Esc button, or F8, F12 to access the BIOS setup. Once your in the BIOS you may have to hunt down the control your looking for but the options are not that many and you should be able find it within a few minutes. Word of warning, by changing settings in the BIOS, you can cause your pc to act much differently or not even boot up correctly. So if you enable the Advanced Host Controller Interface (AHCI) and it does not act like you want it to, you can always change it back.
Hope this helps

Dec 28, 2010 | Dell OptiPlex GX280 PC Desktop

1 Answer

What happens inside the PC between turning the power on and you see the desktop on the screen?


  1. The internal power supply turns on and initializes. The power supply takes some time until it can generate reliable power for the rest of the computer, and having it turn on prematurely could potentially lead to damage. Therefore, the chipset will generate a reset signal to the processor (the same as if you held the reset button down for a while on your case) until it receives the Power Good signal from the power supply.
  2. When the reset button is released, the processor will be ready to start executing. When the processor first starts up, it is suffering from amnesia; there is nothing at all in the memory to execute. Of course processor makers know this will happen, so they pre-program the processor to always look at the same place in the system BIOS ROM for the start of the BIOS boot program. This is normally location FFFF0h, right at the end of the system memory. They put it there so that the size of the ROM can be changed without creating compatibility problems. Since there are only 16 bytes left from there to the end of conventional memory, this location just contains a "jump" instruction telling the processor where to go to find the real BIOS startup program.
  3. The BIOS performs the power-on self test (POST). If there are any fatal errors, the boot process stops. POST beep codes can be found in this area of the Troubleshooting Expert.
  4. The BIOS looks for the video card. In particular, it looks for the video card's built in BIOS program and runs it. This BIOS is normally found at location C000h in memory. The system BIOS executes the video card BIOS, which initializes the video card. Most modern cards will display information on the screen about the video card. (This is why on a modern PC you usually see something on the screen about the video card before you see the messages from the system BIOS itself).
  5. The BIOS then looks for other devices' ROMs to see if any of them have BIOSes. Normally, the IDE/ATA hard disk BIOS will be found at C8000h and executed. If any other device BIOSes are found, they are executed as well.
  6. The BIOS displays its startup screen.
  7. The BIOS does more tests on the system, including the memory count-up test which you see on the screen. The BIOS will generally display a text error message on the screen if it encounters an error at this point; these error messages and their explanations can be found in this part of the Troubleshooting Expert.
  8. The BIOS performs a "system inventory" of sorts, doing more tests to determine what sort of hardware is in the system. Modern BIOSes have many automatic settings and will determine memory timing (for example) based on what kind of memory it finds. Many BIOSes can also dynamically set hard drive parameters and access modes, and will determine these at roughly this time. Some will display a message on the screen for each drive they detect and configure this way. The BIOS will also now search for and label logical devices (COM and LPT ports).
  9. If the BIOS supports the Plug and Play standard, it will detect and configure Plug and Play devices at this time and display a message on the screen for each one it finds. See here for more details on how PnP detects devices and assigns resources.
  10. The BIOS will display a summary screen about your system's configuration. Checking this page of data can be helpful in diagnosing setup problems, although it can be hard to see because sometimes it flashes on the screen very quickly before scrolling off the top.
  11. The BIOS begins the search for a drive to boot from. Most modern BIOSes contain a setting that controls if the system should first try to boot from the floppy disk (A:) or first try the hard disk (C:). Some BIOSes will even let you boot from your CD-ROM drive or other devices, depending on the boot sequence BIOS setting.
  12. Having identified its target boot drive, the BIOS looks for boot information to start the operating system boot process. If it is searching a hard disk, it looks for a master boot record at cylinder 0, head 0, sector 1 (the first sector on the disk); if it is searching a floppy disk, it looks at the same address on the floppy disk for a volume boot sector.
  13. If it finds what it is looking for, the BIOS starts the process of booting the operating system, using the information in the boot sector. At this point, the code in the boot sector takes over from the BIOS. The DOS boot process is described in detail here. If the first device that the system tries (floppy, hard disk, etc.) is not found, the BIOS will then try the next device in the boot sequence, and continue until it finds a bootable device.
  14. If no boot device at all can be found, the system will normally display an error message and then freeze up the system. What the error message is depends entirely on the BIOS, and can be anything from the rather clear "No boot device available" to the very cryptic "NO ROM BASIC - SYSTEM HALTED". This will also happen if you have a bootable hard disk partition but forget to set it active.

Nov 02, 2010 | PC Desktops

1 Answer

After two years of use, no BIOS beep and nothing on screen.


Open cpu cabinet Reattch all connection to harddisk power cable and sata or Ide cable.
Then Pull cmos cell from motherbord chipset for 10 minutes so all bios settings are defaults.then Power up the computer press "del" or F1 or F2 to ente rin bios then check your harddisk is detected or not.
arddisk must detercted in bios for boot.
Also set first boot device as your harddisk.
then save settings and exit.

Aug 15, 2009 | PC Desktops

3 Answers

Green display on boot up Please help


Check to see that there are no machine BIOS settings that could affect the monitor. Normally, the bios controls display until the OS takes over. If your XP screen after bootup looks fine, I don't see how you have a problem with your monitor setup under Windows.

Jul 03, 2009 | PC Desktops

1 Answer

Acer one, set bios to boot from usb. but wont boot display can you help?


Hi there jack......set computer bios to boot from cdrom then harddisc.....this will allow your computer to boot actual data then display on screen...take caution when changing bios settings

Sep 09, 2008 | PC Desktops

1 Answer

Hp pVILLION DV 1000


This error message may appear when the computer BIOS is set to boot from a network and cannot find a bootable operating system on the network or on any of the storage devices included in the notebook PC's boot path.

The following steps are for most HP Pavilion and Compaq Presario Notebook PCs. The boot order can be configured on the Advanced tab in the BIOS settings menu. The steps to modify the boot order may vary depending on the model of your computer. On most HP notebooks the boot order can be configured using the following steps:
  1. Turn on or restart the computer.
  2. While the display is blank, press the F10 key to enter the BIOS settings menu. NOTE: Some notebook PCs use the F2 or F6 key.
  3. Use the right and left arrow keys to select the Advanced tab.
  4. Use the up and down arrow keys to select Boot Order .
  5. Follow the on-screen instructions to change the boot order.
Reset the boot order to the default settings Use the following steps to reset the boot order to the default settings:
  1. Turn on or restart the computer.
  2. While the display is blank, press the F10 key to enter the BIOS settings menu.
  3. Press the F9 key to reset the BIOS to default settings.
  4. Press the F10 to save the changes and exit the BIOS settings menu.

I think it will you to fix your problem.
If still have problem then tell me more about it.

Thanks
Iqbal

Mar 18, 2008 | HP Pavilion Elite M9060N PC Desktop

1 Answer

Booth IBM NetVista FRom CD


to boot from your cd rom, you will have to change your settings in bois to boot from cdrom. You can enter your bios setting when you switch on your pc, You will have a screen displaying your bios posting or you pc manufacturer logo, on this screen there will be a message like " press del to enter setup' or 'press F2 to enter bios setting' look for this message and press the required key. WARNING messing up your bios settings could cause big problems. Once you are in the BIOS setup look for options like booting sequence or boot. You will have messages on the screen on how to navigate thro the setup and change values for different settings. go thro this carefully, Once you are on the booting screen select the option "First Booting Device" as cdrom them dont forget to save the setting before exiting the setup. WARNING BIOS SETTINGS AND SETUP SCREEN DIFFERS FROM BIOS MANUFACTURER TO MANUFACTURER. Check which bios your pc has and go through the manual before doing anything. the manual can be got from the bios manufacturer's web site.Otherwise call the service engineer to do the job.

Jan 01, 2008 | IBM NetVista PC Desktop

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