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Whilst operation, the dc power pack stopped functioning and battery level got depleted until the laptop suddenly switched off. I have replaced the power pack and the laptop is working. The problem I have notice is that the date and time are not moving despite several resets via bios set up. What do i do?

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Upgrade the bios and before, replace the bios battery

Posted on Aug 08, 2010

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Thinkpad not turning on, Flashing Amber light when battery inserted


The problem is most likely in the DC jack in the laptop, "common issue" the laptop must be dismantled down to the motherboard level, chances are the main board must be removed from the bottom chassis and flipped over to expose the solder joints underneath the DC jack and a resolder touch up done.

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My c610 battery i have replaced it 2 times but it still dolesnt charges it stops it stops to charge during charging


Hi nabhanizatio

DELL LATITUDE C610 BATTERY CHARGE FAILURE

The likely cause of the original battery fault is a very common mistake in the way laptops are used. A laptop battery, working at optimum efficiency, whether of the older Nickel Cadmium and Nickel Metal Hydride or newer Lithium Ion types, is meant to charge under power and then discharge under use, if it is to have a long and useful life. This means that it should be used in a similar way to a cellphone's battery - connected to mains electricity and charged up when low or flat and then disconnected from the power and used on battery power alone until the power level means the cycle needs repeating. Many people, however, unwittingly use their laptops like desktop PCs and leave the mains electricity permanently connected to it even after the battery is fully charged. The reason that people cite for doing this is 'convenience'. This, however, is a mistake.

Laptops have more flexibility than cellphones in that, if they are mainly used in one place rather than as mobile devices, then it is possible to charge the battery to full capacity, disconnect from the mains, then remove and keep the battery until the next time the laptop's mobility function is required (periodically recharge the stored battery if not in use for long periods of time because the charge slowly dissipates when not in use), reconnect the mains to the battery-less laptop and use it like that, ad infinitum.

When a laptop battery is fully charged, what it really wants to do is discharge. However, maintaining the mains connection prevents it from doing so. The Power Management
System on the motherboard is designed to cope with long periods of either battery powered or battery-less mains powered use, but not long periods of simultaneous battery + mains powered use. A fully charged battery still connected to mains electricity has no means of discharging and various power sensitive components such as the Power Inverter, Cold Cathode Backlight, LCD Panel, Graphics Chip and Motherboard Power Management Stystem can become damaged by the power bottleneck created.

Using the battery in this wrong way also gradually depletes the charging capacity of the cells, until eventually, the cells can carry no charge, meaning a dead battery. A dead battery, where the cells are depleted, left in the laptop with the mains connected, is even worse for the Power Managent System
because the flow of power to the motherboard via the dead battery cells is inefficient and intermittent, creating battery overheating, low CPU Cooling Fan speed, inferior cooling and consequent internal overheating hazards in addition to potential electrical damage to several components. When damage to the Motherboard Power Management System passes a certain point, even a new battery might not charge - the situation in which you now find yourself.

Loose DC jacks, leading to intermittent power drops and surges, are typically caused by the jack being allowed to take the weight of the heavy transformer box on the laptop's power cable. The solution is to ensure that the laptop is never held, carried or used with the transformer hanging unsupported. If the laptop is in use, the transformer should be disconnected, carried, placed on a desk or table near the laptop (if the cord is short) or laid completely full-weight-flat on the floor (if the cord is long enough). Also, a Surge Suppressor/Surge Protector should always be used between the mains power socket and all computer
equipment, rather than directly to the mains.

If either the Motherboard Power Management System or DC Jack are ever damaged, your laptop would require professional specialist repair by a Component Level Laptop Repair Specialist, providing No Fix No Fee, Warrantied Repairs ( typically 3-6 months Repair Warranty).

I hope this helps.


If this answer does help you, please take the time to rate it. This helps answerers better understand the needs and the point of view of the asker and guides us in exploring the best ways to provide useful, high quality answers. If you need further help, please feel free to post another question or add a comment to this question.


Thanks for using FixYa.

Oct 07, 2011 | Dell Latitude C610 Notebook

2 Answers

My laptop sony vaio will not hold a charge for very long.


battery backup problem replace a battery or purchase a new battery.

Sep 02, 2011 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Precautions to take in replacing deffective laptop battery with brandnew one


Hi

The likely cause of the original battery fault and the key to what to look out for in future with the new battery is a very common mistake in the way laptops are used.

A laptop battery, working at optimum efficiency, whether of the older Nickel Cadmium and Nickel Metal Hydride or newer Lithium Ion types, is meant to charge under power and then discharge under use, if it is to have a long and useful life.

This means that it should be used in a similar way to a cellphone's battery - connected to mains electricity and charged up when low or flat and then disconnected from the power and used on battery power alone until the power level means the cycle needs repeating.

Many people, however, unwittingly use their laptops like desktop PCs and leave the mains electricity connected to it even after the battery is fully charged. The reason that people cite for doing this is 'convenience'.

This, however, is a mistake.

Laptops have more flexibility than cellphones in that, if they are mainly used in one place rather than as mobile devices, then it is possible to charge the battery to full capacity, disconnect from the mains, then remove and keep the battery until the next time the laptop's mobility function is required (periodically recharge the stored battery if not in use for long periods of time because the charge slowly dissipates when not in use), reconnect the mains to the battery-less laptop and use it like that, ad infinitum.

When a laptop battery is fully charged, what it really wants to do is discharge. However, maintaining the mains connection, prevents it from doing so. The
power management system on the motherboard is designed to cope with long periods of either battery powered or battery-less mains powered use, but not long periods of simultaneous battery + mains powered use. A fully charged battery still connected to mains electricity has no means of discharging and various power sensitive components such as the Power Inverter, Cold Cathode Backlight, LCD Panel and Graphics Chip can become damaged by the power bottleneck created.

Using the battery in this wrong way also gradually depletes the charging capacity of the cells, until eventually, the cells can carry no charge, meaning a dead battery. A dead battery, where the cells are depleted, left in the laptop with the mains connected, is even worse for the Power M
anagement System because the flow of power to the motherboard via the dead battery cells is inefficient and intermittent, creating battery overheating, low CPU Cooling Fan speed, inferior cooling and consequent internal overheating hazards in addition to potential electrical damage to several components.

Loose DC jacks, leading to intermittent power drops and surges, are typically caused by the jack being allowed to take the weight of the heavy transformer box on the laptop's power cable. The solution is to ensure that the laptop is never held, carried or used with the transformer hanging unsupported. If the laptop is in use, the transformer should be disconnected, carried, placed on a desk or table near the laptop (if the cord is short) or laid completely full-weight-flat on the floor (if the cord is long enough).

Also, always use a Surge Supressor/Surge Protector between the mains power socket and all Co
mputer equipment, never directly to the mains.

When battery cells are dead, a replacement battery is required and should be bought and installed as soon as possible. In the meantime, the old, dead battery should be removed and the laptop used (battetyless) on mains power alone.

If either the Motherboard Power Management System or DC Jack are ever damaged,
your laptop would require professional specialist repair by a Component Level Laptop Repair Specialist, providing No Fix No Fee, Warrantied Repairs ( typically 3-6 months Repair Warranty). So avoiding battery failure can help avoid great inconvenience and save high repair fees. Manage the new battery and the AC/DC Adapter in the way described above and you should hopefully avoid similar problems in future.

I hope this helps.


If this answer does help you, please take the time to rate it. This helps answerers better understand the needs and the point of view of the asker and guides us in exploring the best ways to provide useful, high quality answers. If you need further help, please feel free to post another question or add a comment to this question.

Thanks for using FixYa

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2 Answers

I bought A sony VAIO VGN-TXN29N when i plug the system battary its blinking and its not charging please advise what can i do regards


The likely cause of this problem is a common mistake in the way laptops are used.

A laptop battery, working at optimum efficiency, whether of the older Nickel Cadmium and Nickel Metal Hydride or newer Lithium Ion types, is meant to charge under power and then discharge under use, if it is to have a long and useful life.

This means that it should be used in a similar way to a cellphone's battery - connected to mains electricity and charged up when low or flat and then disconnected from the power and used on battery power alone until the power level means the cycle needs repeating. Many people, however, unwittingly use their laptops like desktop pcs and leave the mains electricity connected to it even after the battery is fully charged. The reason that people cite for doing this is convenience.

However, laptops have more flexibility than cellphones in that, if they are mainly used in one place rather than as mobile devices, then it is possible to charge the battery to full, disconnect from the mains, then remove and keep the battery until the next time the laptop's mobile function is required (periodically recharge the battery if not in use for long periods of time because the charge slowly dissipates when not in use), reconnect the mains to the battery-less laptop and use it like that, ad infinitum.

When a laptop battery is fully charged, what it really wants to do is discharge but maintaining the mains connection, prevents it from doing so. The power management system on the motherboard is designed to cope with long periods of either battery powered or battery-less mains powered use, but not long periods of simultaneous battery + mains powered use. The battery has no means of discharging and various power sensitive components such as the inverter, backlights, lcd panel and graphics chips can become damaged by the power bottleneck created.

Using the battery in this wrong way also gradually depletes the charging capacity of the cells, until eventually, the cells can carry no charge, meaning a dead battery. A dead battery, where the cells are depleted, left in the laptop with the mains connected, is even worse for the power management system because the flow of power to the motherboard via the dead battery cells battery is inefficient and intermittent, creating battery overheating, low fan speed, inferior cooling, internal overheating hazards to the potential electrical damage to several components.

Loose DC jacks, leading to intermittent power drops and surges, are typically caused by the jack being allowed to take the weight of the heavy transformer box on the laptop's power cable. The solution is to ensure that the laptop is never held, carried or used with the transformer hanging unsupported. If the laptop is in use, the transformer should be disconnected, carried, placed on a desk or table near the laptop (if the cord is short) or lain completely full-weight-flat on the floor (if the cord is long enough).

Also, always use a surge protector for computer equipment, never directly to the mains.

If the battery cells are dead, you require a replacement battery.

If either the Motherboard Power Management System or DC Jack are damaged, your laptop requires professional specialist repair by a Component Level Laptop Repair Specialist, providing No Fix No Fee, Warrantied Repairs ( typically 3-6 months Repair Warranty).

When you get your laptop back after the repair, manage the power in the way described above and you should hopefully avoid similar problems in future.

Also check for any damage to the cable where it joins to the transformer box. Also, obviously check for blown plug fuses.

Hope this helps

Aug 02, 2011 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Gateway kav60 not charging. i have to wiggle the cord and sometimes it refuses to charge.


I guess you've got a broken laptop power dc jack or power cable.


Symptoms of a broken Laptop DC power jack:


- The laptop only operates when you hold the DC power plug in a certain direction (DC jack is broken or loose).
- The laptop only runs on battery power (no power is getting through the DC jack).
- The laptop gets no power at all.
- The laptop will not charge the battery.
- The laptop switches from AC power to battery power intermittently due to a loose or broken power jack.
- The laptop suddenly shuts off.
- The DC jack may feel loose.
- Sparks come out of the back of the laptop when you insert the power plug into the DC jack.

Apr 21, 2011 | Lifetime Gateway KAV60 Replacement Laptop...

1 Answer

Toshiba Laptop L25-s119 will not work under household power.


Is this a new laptop ?

Your battery may need replacement!

Dec 21, 2009 | Toshiba Satellite L25-S119 Notebook

1 Answer

Tech manual for Asus Z96J lap top. need to replace the dc power jack how do I access the power jack?


For all the function and portability laptops provide, there are also some drawbacks. The biggest problem with laptops is with battery life. To get constant battery power, the laptop has to be plugged into a wall outlet. The wall plug then connects to the DC jack in the back of the laptop. The DC jack is no more than a little piece of metal that conducts the electricity for the computer. These DC jacks are known to be fragile and break off easily. If this happens, you can open the laptop and replace the DC jack yourself.
  1. Step 1 Remove the internal battery pack from your laptop. Flip the laptop over and locate the release button for the battery pack. Hold the button in to slide the battery pack free. It is important that you remove the internal battery pack as well as unplug the power cord from the wall outlet to prevent risk of shock while working inside the laptop.
  2. Step 2 Unscrew all of the screws on the underside of your laptop. The number of screws will depend on the model of computer. There should be one at each corner and then one or two screws that hold the hard drivemag-glass_10x10.gif cover in place. Once the screws are removed, take out your computer's hard drive. Newer-model computers will have a hard drive that slides out of the side of the computer.
  3. Step 3 Locate the two screws at the back of the computer that hold the laptop screen's hinges in place. Once these two screws are removed, gently pull up on the screen until you clear the silver pegs from the holes in the laptop's body. Two wires lead from the screen into the computer, so ensure you do not pull so hard that you disconnect them. Carefully set the laptop screen aside so it does not get damaged while you work inside the computer.
  4. Step 4 Separate the two halves of the laptop's body to expose the computer's internal components. Flip the keyboard on its face, making sure not to disconnect the keyboard's connector. Underneath the keyboard will be a metal plate that covers the computer's motherboard. Unscrew the screws that hold this plate in place and set it aside.
  5. Step 5 Locate the DC jack for the laptop. Most all laptop's DC jack outlets are located at the back left corner of the computer. Using your tweezers, remove the old DC jack. Identify the slot in the motherboard that the old DC jack came out of. If the DC jack was loose before you removed it, there will be a small slot at the base of the opening in the back of the computer that the DC jack pops into. Using the tweezers again, slide the new DC jack into this slot until you hear a clicking sound. To hold it in place you can solder the new jack to the motherboard, or simply superglue it in place. Don't use too much superglue or you will risk losing the ability for the jack to conduct electricity.

Nov 14, 2009 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Cassette Jam


The most frequent cause of this type situation is not having a power source attached, or a depleted battery pack. Once the power source is available, some models require manually unlatching and opening the cassette compartment cover. When the cover is fully open, the videocassette will eject automatically. Please try the following procedures. 1. Attach the power source to the camcorder correctly or use a fully-charged battery pack. 2. Fully-open the cassette compartment cover until it stops while sliding and holding the OPEN/EJECT switch. The videocassette will eject automatically after a few seconds.

Sep 04, 2005 | Canon Optura 500 Mini DV Digital Camcorder

1 Answer

Cassette Jam


The most frequent cause of this type situation is not having a power source attached, or a depleted battery pack. Once the power source is available, some models require manually unlatching and opening the cassette compartment cover. When the cover is fully open, the videocassette will eject automatically. Please try the following procedures. 1. Attach the power source to the camcorder correctly or use a fully-charged battery pack. 2. Fully-open the cassette compartment cover until it stops while sliding and holding the OPEN/EJECT switch. The videocassette will eject automatically after a few seconds.

Sep 04, 2005 | Canon GL2 Mini DV Digital Camcorder

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